US Cargo Control Webbing Donated to Children’s Library Program

US Cargo Control webbing, used to manufacture ratchet straps and other cargo control equipment, will be re-purposed for a children’s library program in Banks County, Georgia. The leftover materials were donated and will be used to create handles on library bags for children who receive new library cards or visit the library for the first time. The program is designed to get area kiddos excited about visiting the library and reading.

US Cargo Control webbing was donated to a library program in Georgia.
A children’s library program in Georgia received a donation of USCC webbing to be used for library bags.

Clickstop Inc., owns and operates several brands including US Cargo Control. The Banks County Public Library contacted the brand about the possibility of donating extra webbing. Company leaders felt it would have been a missed opportunity not to help.

“The webbing we donated was leftover from the manufacturing process,” Clickstop Chief Culture Officer Jim Mayhew explained. “Why wouldn’t we donate it to a program that is helping children learn to read? Those materials could have easily been wasted.”

Clickstop manufacturing
Members of the company’s manufacturing team cut the webbing to specification for the library bags.

Employees in the company’s manufacturing department custom cut the webbing to the size needed for the bags. The company than shipped enough vibrantly colored pieces to create handles for 50 bags.

The tote bags will be assembled by a church sewing club in Banks County, GA. All materials for the bags are donated, mostly by generous community members. Though over time, program leaders began to worry they may not be able to keep creating the library bags because of the cost of materials, especially the webbing for the handles.

That’s when Banks County Public Library Manager Stacy Krumnow went online and began asking companies to donate scrap materials. Very few responded, until she found US Cargo Control.

“We are so excited and thankful,” Krumnow said. “If it helps one child boosts his or her confidence to love to read then your company has made a difference in the future of that child and our community.”

Just this summer alone the library has distributed 50 reading bags to kids. The library also provides tutoring and lunch programs for children in the community, and works closely with the school district that serves about 2,600 students in the area.