National Farmer’s Day

National Manufacturing Day is a day to celebrate farmers across the nation for all their hard work to provide food for everybody.

Without Farmers and Agriculture, there would be no food in grocery stores or on our tables.

National Farmer’s Day was on October 12th. Originally known as Old Farmer’s Day, it is a day to pay tribute to the men, women, and families who put food in our grocery stores and onto our tables every day.

Since the beginning of agriculture, the impact of farmers hasn’t just been their integrity and their continued ability to provide our nation with the food we eat. They contribute to our economy in several ways. Farmers supply a stream of jobs, keep small and large communities together, and provide numerous products and needs that keep other businesses running. Other products and industries that are relied on by agriculture include restaurants, transportation, apparel, railroads, and more.

Source: Leverage

National Farmer’s Day was set on October 12th because it is after the traditional harvest time of many crops. This way, farmers would be able to join in on the festivities because they are done with the harvesting.

One of the things US Cargo Control is able to help farmers with is providing them with the right tools for their farm equipment. In fact, we recently hosted an Iowa Corn Growers event at US Cargo Control headquarters. The event included important training and discussion on how to safely extract a vehicle with the proper equipment, as well as giving additional information on the products we carry and how they help ensure safety when transferring cargo both on and off public roadways.

USCC team member, Tim Sanders, talking to the crowd of Iowa Corn Grower Members.

Some of the equipment discussed in this lecture included shackles, recovery straps, and tow straps. We carry galvanized shackles and stainless steel shackles, but they have different applications. Stainless steel shackles are used for marine applications, while galvanized shackles are more for industrial applications.

Along with shackles, it is important to know which strap to use. Recovery straps are the better choice to use to extract a stuck vehicle because of the nylon fabrication. Tow straps are not recommended for extracting stuck vehicles but are better for moving a free-moving vehicle behind your vehicle.

To learn more about how to use these products, read about the types of shackles we carry as well as the difference between recovery straps and tow straps.

To all the farmers who work hard every day, thank you for all that you do. Being headquarted in Central Iowa, we understand how important agriculture is and your presence is much appreciated!

Source: Leverage

If you have any questions, give our team of experts a call at 800-404-7068.

Snap Shackles: What Can I Use a Quick Release Shackle for?

A snap shackle has unique features, like a captive pin, which makes it great for certain applications.

What is a Snap Shackle, how are they used, and what are their similarities and differences?

We carry many different types of shackles, but a snap shackle is not like an anchor shackle, d shackle, bow shackle, etc. While these other shackles are more heavy-duty and powerful, a snap shackle has unique features, like a captive pin, which makes it great for certain applications. The captive pin on these stainless steel shackles allows you to use them without worrying of dropping or losing the pin. This makes them great for many rigging and lifting applications, especially those near water or marine-like environments.

The Similarities Among Snap Shackles

First, it is important to know that all snap shackles we carry have certain similarities. They each contain a spring-loaded captive pin, which stays locked and cannot be removed from the body. In order to open this pin, you must pull to engage the opening.

These shackles are made of Stainless Steel Type 316, also known as Marine Grade Stainless Steel. Obviously, this also makes them great for marine use and nautical applications. Type 316 contains an element called molybdenum, which helps prevent against corrosive damage from saltwater. Another distinctive characteristic is you can use these shackles quickly with one hand, which is excellent for jobs where speed is important.

So, What Are the Differences?

The Eye Swivel has a circular shape, or eye shape, on one end. Note that this end has no opening. In order to use this swivel shackle, you can simply clip something to it. The Jaw Swivel has a screw pin on the end, instead of an eye-shaped opening. The pin is kept in place by a “keyring” that must be removed before the pin can actually remove from the body.

Both swivel snap shackles have a swivel on one end that can rotate 360 degrees. This helps prevent tangling, which makes it ideal to use with high-movement items. These shackles come in the following sizes: 2-3/4″, 3-1/2″, and 5″.

stainless steel eye swivel snap shackle
Eye Swivel Snap Shackle

quick release jaw swivel snap shackle
Jaw Swivel Snap Shackle

Fixed Snap Shackle and Rope Sheet Snap Shackle

The end of a Fixed Snap Shackle has an identical circular shape like the eye swivel, but it functions differently. The end is non-twisting, so the fixed snap shackle is not recommended for applications that require twisting and spinning movement. The Rope Sheet Snap Shackle has an end that is “rope friendly” for your marine and sailing applications.

The fixed snap shackle comes in sizes 2″, 2-3/4″, and 4″, and the rope sheet snap shackle comes in sizes 2″, 2-1/2″, and 3-3/4″.

stainless steel fixed snap shackle
Fixed Snap Shackle

rope shackle
Rope Sheet Snap Shackle

What Can I Use Snap Shackles For?

You can use a snap shackle in several ways. You can apply these quick release shackles for your lifting and rigging needs, or marine applications. Or, you can even use them for personal use, such as using it as a dog leash clip, for halyards (line of rope used to hoist a ladder, sail, or flag), or even on a gate.

The key to remember is that the swivel shackles are used for frequent spinning movements, while the fixed snap shackle and rope sheet snap shackles are suitable for more straight-line applications.

Keep in mind that it’s extremely important to check the working load limit (WLL) of the clip or hook to ensure it will work for your intended use. These snap shackles are designed to be quickly and easily opened, so we recommend that you consider these shackles to meet your application’s workload before purchasing them. Also, we advise that you do not use these to lift heavy loads, so be cautious.

Learn More About Shackles in this Video

In this short video, Lacy talks about other types of shackles and brands we have available.

source: US Cargo Control

If you would like to know more about these snap shackles or the other shackles, check out the complete shackles section of the USCC website, or call our team of experts at 800-404-7068.

What are the Differences Between Types of Shackles?

Shackles are manufactured  in a wide variety of types, styles, sizes, and fabrications, and with so many different options available, choosing the right shackle for the job can be confusing.

We’ve outlined some of the basic differences between the most common types of shackles. If you have any questions, contact one of our rigging product specialists on our sales team at 800-660-3585.


Anchor shackle/bow shackle vs.chain shackle/D-shackle

Anchor shackle
Anchor shackle

Bow shackles and anchor shackles are terms that are often used interchangeably, as both names refer to a shackle with a larger, rounded “O” shape look. However, a bow shackle typically has a larger, more defined bow area than an anchor shackle. The rounded design of anchor shackles and bow shackles allow them to take loads from many directions without developing significant side load. The larger loop shape of an anchor shackle or bow shackle does reduce its overall strength, but it is also able to handle a larger strap.

 

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Chain shackle

Chain shackles are also known as D-shackles. Both refer to the “D” shape design. A d-shackle is narrower than a bow or anchor shackle and generally have a threaded pin or pin close. The smaller loop is designed to take high loads primarily in line. Side and racking loads may twist or bend a D or chain shackle.

Both types of shackles are generally always available in galvanized  metal and stainless steel, and all come with different pin options as well.

 

Stainless steel vs. galvanized 

Both stainless steel and galvanized metal offer excellent protection from rust and corrosion, making either a good choice.

In general, galvanized shackles are ideal for industrial applications where moisture is not a major issue. Galvanized steel has a thin coating of zinc oxide to protect the steel from elements that lead to corrosion and oxidation. Galvanized is also a great value as it tends to be less expensive than stainless steel, but still maintains the shackle’s strength and durability.

Stainless steel shackles are more corrosive-resistant and, are therefore ideal for marine applications. Our stainless steel shackles are made of type 316 stainless steel, which is considered “marine grade.” Type 316 marine grade stainless steel contains molybdenum, which makes it resistant to ocean water mist or spray, so it’s especially useful in extreme conditions or moisture or in a high chloride environment. Type 316 stainless D shackle equipment is ideal for sailing and yacht rigging uses.

 

Snap shackles

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Swivel Eye Snap Shackle

A snap shackle is designed with a spring-activated mechanism so it can be used quickly and with one hand. These are excellent for jobs where speed is important, or when it needs to be repeated connected/disconnected. Because they generally  have lower working load limits than comparable bolt type or pin type shackles, snap shackles are not recommended for heavy-duty applications. We offer four main types, all in Type 316 stainless steel: Swivel Eye, Swivel Jaw, Fixed Snap, and Rope Snap.

 

Pin options

The pin that locks a shackle can be a deciding factor on which will work best for your job. Pin styles range include loose pins, captive pins, round pins, screw pins, and bolt type pins. Screw pin shackles are popular because they offer a pin that is easy to connect and disconnect. Captive pin shackles offer a pin that cannot be removed from the bow of the shackle which is essential in various marine applications. Captive pins are also particularly  popular for marine uses because they can’t be accidentally dropped in the water. Bolt type shackles secure with a bolt/nut/cotter pin combination and are popular for more heavy duty securement.

Shop our full selection from our website:

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Customer Photos: Stainless Steel Shackles for Fishing

shark4These latest photos we’ve received were a little surprising. While we know stainless steel shackles are used in a wide variety of the industries we serve, fishing is not one that immediately comes to mind- especially when you’re used to hearing from customers in the rigging and lifting field.shark1

Dalton from Texas sent us these great photos of a 5’8″ bull shark he caught in Matagorda, Texas. He says he used one of our stainless steel shackles: the 3/16″ stainless steel bolt type anchor shackle to connect the hook drops to the rest of the shark leader.  shackle

This particular type of shackle is a great choice for an application like this since it offers an excellent combination of strength and protection against corrosion due to the Type 316 marine-grade stainless steel. The bolt pin design also allows for added securement since a nut is screwed on the end and a pre-drilled hole allows for a cotter pin to keep the bolt form loosening with extended use.

Dalton mentioned that this is just one of the many sharks he has caught with our shackles. We’re just hoping he keeps sending us pictures!

If you have pictures of our products in use- send them our way! Send us an e-mail at CustomerService@USCargoControl.com or post them to our US Cargo Control Facebook page.

New to Boating? Don’t Forget the Shackles

If you’re the proud new owner of a boat, you should become familiar with common rigging equipment like shackles.

Shackles are an extremely strong U-shaped piece of equipment that connects items together, securing with a pin, spring, or bolt. While most commonly thought of for industrial uses, shackles come in a variety of shapes and sizes and are used in boating to secure an anchor, hold lines in place, etc.

Anchor/Bow shackle
Anchor shackles are also known as bow shackles. Both names refer to a shackle with a larger “O” shape look. This design can take loads from many directions without developing significant side load. The larger loop shape reduces its overall strength, but it’s also able to handle a larger strap.

Chain/D-shackle
Chain shackles are also known as D-shackles. Both names refer to a shackle with a “D” shape design. A d-shackle is narrower than an anchor/bow and generally has a threaded pin or pin close. The smaller loop is designed to take high loads primarily in line. Side and racking loads can bend or twist a Chain/D-shackle.

Twisted shackle
A twist design allows you to hook it up from the same direction the pin is facing, so it’s great for situations where hook up can be limited.

Pin types
Both anchor/bow and chain/d-shackles come with different pin options. Keep in mind that the pin that locks a shackle can be a deciding factor on which type will work best for the job. A few options include screw pins, captive pins, bolt pins, and round pins.

Screw Pin Shackles are popular because they have a simple pin that’s easy to disconnect and connect.

Captive pin shackles have a pin that cannot be removed from the bow so it can’t accidentally fall out and into the water.

Bolt pin shackles have an oversized bolt pin with a pre-drilled hole for a cotter pin to slide through to keep the bolt tight.

Round pin shackles are similar to bolt pins that use a cotter pin, but with a round design rather than a bolt.

Snap shackle
Another variation of the D-shackle is a snap shackle, however it’s an all-inclusive design with  a spring-activated mechanism so it can be used quickly and with one hand. These are handy for jobs where speed is important, or when an item needs to be hooked and unhooked often. However, snap shackles are not recommended to secure heavy-duty loads.

There are natural advantages and disadvantages of all the shackle options, so you might want to experiment with a few different types to get a feel for what will work best for your specific needs.

A few other items to consider adding to your boating supplies:

A boat winch strap is designed specifically to launch and retrieve the boat to and from a trailer.

Buckle boat straps ensure safe transport.

Marine tape is a white, flexible waterproof tape that’s designed for heavy duty marine use, but also works great for recreational supplies, like attaching to life jackets and vests, ring buoys, inflatable rafts, etc.