How To Tie Down an ATV Using Ratchet Straps

Ratchet straps are an easy and fast way to secure an ATV for transport, and generally range in size from 1″ to 4″ wide. For best results, be sure to choose a ratchet strap with an adequate working load limit (WLL) to secure the weight of your vehicle.

Once your ATV is on the trailer and the parking break is engaged, begin by taking the long end of the strap and feed it up and through the frame of the ATV. The frame is the most stable part to tie down; do not wrap the strap around the axles or any other moving part that is vulnerable to bending or breaking.

After the ratchet straps are secured to the trailer, it’s important to pull the slack out of the strap before you begin ratcheting. Spooling too much webbing around the shaft which will not allow you to tie it down securely. While holding the strap end tightly, ratchet to tighten. Wrap any excess strapping around the taut strap to keep it from blowing during transit.

Secure your ATV with four tie down points- two in the front and two in the back- to prevent forward, backward, and side-to-side movement.

It’s also a good idea to check your state DOT regulations for any additional rules and regulations for transporting an ATV.

What’s New at US Cargo Control

We’ve been busy adding lots of new products to our US Cargo Control website. We’ve listed some of the latest by category below. For more information on each product, click on the link to take you to USCargoControl.com.

If there’s a product or a group of new items you’d like to see us add to our website, please be sure to let us know- either by a comment below or contacting us at 866-444-9990.

Rigging supplies & hardware
Our rigging supplies category is a varied one- including everything from small connecting links to heavy duty anchor shackles. This category is also unique because it has products that can be used for professional rigging jobs, as well as simple uses around the job site, farm, and even home.

-Cable railing systems

image of cable railing system railsOne example of a product with various uses is our
cable railing systems. Although it’s technically considered
wire rope, its lightweight design is great for stair railings,
deck railings, garage doors and more. We offer a 7×19 construction, which is comprised of 7 strands of 19 wires.
This allows it to have a slim profile without sacrificing
strength. Other profiles and styles are available by request, just contact our sales team at 800-660-3585.

 

-Rope
We’ve also added a huge selection of rope, including everything from natural manila rope for decorative use, to California Truck Rope for dependable tie-down uses for professional truckers.

Image of 3/16" twisted manila rope

Image of 1/4" California truck rope

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ratchet straps and tie downs
Ratchet straps and tie downs is another group of products with various uses- from flatbed trucks to simple motorcycle trailers.

-Replacement tie down straps
image of 3" ratchet replacement strap with flat hookOur tough polyester replacement straps
are a great way to add extra working life to straps you already own, since you only
buy the replacement strap that you need. They’re also an easy way to convert your winch straps into ratchet straps.

 

image of 2" replacement ratchet strap with chain extension

 

 

Our tie down replacement straps come in
1″, 2″, 3″and 4″ widths, in an extremely strong best to find the products you’re looking for.

 

-Bungee cords

image of 10 pack 1/2"x48" bungee cordsYou can never have too many handy bungee cords around the house, in the garage, on the farm, or at the jobsite.

While they’re great for securing cargo, boxes and other items for hauling, they’re also perfect for bundling items to make them easier to carry or store away, keeping lids closed on coolers, tool boxes, animal crates, garbage cans, etc.

-Soft tie straps with plush covers
We have several motorcycle tie down straps to choose from, but these motorcycle straps with soft tie plush covers will protect your bike from scratches and dings during transport. They’re designed like a typical handle bar strap, but the soft chamois covers provide and extra layer of protection.

image of plush cover motorcycle straps

-Roller idler

image of e-track roller idler fitting

Simply snap the roller idler fitting assembly into E-track installed on your trailer floor and you can instantly secure a vehicle by either the frame or the tires. The roller design moves toward the direction of the tension which keeps the strap close to the track.

 

How to Thread Ratchet Straps and Cam Buckle Straps

While both ratchet straps and cam buckle straps are used to haul various types of cargo and come in sizes ranging from 1″ to 4″ in width, there are some key differences between the two.

Ratchet straps

A ratchet strap is available with many different fittings: chain extension, d-ring, e-track fitting, e-track double stud fitting, f-track hook and spring e-fitting, flat hook, flat snap hook, j-hook with d-ring, s-hook, and vinyl coated wire hook.

Polyester webbing is most often used for both ratchet straps and cam buckle straps because it has a low stretch rate and is very resistant to abrasion.

How to thread a ratchet strap

1.) Open the ratchet so you have access to the take-up spool.

2.) Slide the strap through the spool and bring it right back on itself.

3.) Pull on the strap to remove the excess slack.

4.) Once the slack is removed, you can start to ratchet the strap to the desired tension, keeping the strap straight.

5.) Once you have reached your desired tension, lock the ratchet down to its closed position.

To release the strap, open the ratchet all the way so it is completely flat and pull the strap out.

In cases where you do not need the strength of a ratchet strap, a cam buckle is an excellent choice. Cam straps are also available with various types of attachment hardware: butterfly fitting, e-track fitting, F-track hook and spring e-fitting, handle bar strap with S-hook, flat snap hook and s-hook.

Cam buckle straps

Cam buckle straps typically come in 1″ and 2″ sizes. This video highlights the differences between ratchet straps and cam buckles and also shows how to thread a cam buckle.

How to thread a cam buckle strap

1.) Turn the cam buckle over and thread your strap back through while pressing the thumb release.

2.) While pressing the thumb release, pull the strap to your desired tension and then release.

To release the strap, press the thumb button and simply pull the strap.

Choosing between a ratchet strap and a cam buckle generally depends on workload limit or how fragile the product is that you are securing. If the cargo is light and fragile, go with a cam buckle since you cannot run the risk of over-tightening and crushing the product. For items heavier or more sturdy, a ratchet strap is a good choice.

E-Track Fittings for Ratchet & Cam Straps

This video shows the proper procedure of inserting and removing an E-track ratchet strap & cam buckle fitting onto E track and A track rails. The 2″ Spring E-Fitting is the hardware found on the ends of E-Track and A-Track ratchet straps and cam buckle straps. The end of the fitting has a “spring trigger” for easy application and release. Designed for use with Series E and Series A track, this versatile fitting is ready for immediate shipment.

For more information or to purchase the items used in this video, click on the links below.

US Cargo Control Goes Camping

The trees are turning green, mowers are humming… summer is almost here. And if you’re a camping enthusiast, that means it’s time to start getting your gear ready. To make things easier, we’ve put together a list of essentials you might not have considered, and you can find them all at uscargocontrol.com. Camping with US Cargo Control picture

1) Tie down straps
Although they’re just a few inches wide, tie down straps are big on versatility. By allowing you to secure gear outside your vehicle, you can free up extra space inside. Use these workhorses for securing tents, hiking gear, bikes, fishing tackle and other necessities to a rooftop rack, a back bike rack, the top of a camper, or inside a boat. Choose either a ratchet strap or cam buckle strap based on what you’re securing. A cam buckle pinches the webbing between the teeth and the buckle, but can only be as tight as your strength will allow; it’s great for securing more fragile items since you can’t over tighten it.  If you need something stronger, a ratchet is the way to go.  The webbing is secured around the ratchet mandrel and tightening is done with a ratcheting action using leverage to pull the strap very tight.

2) Tent stakes
If you have a camper, you may think you don’t need tent stakes, but these handy items can be a real life saver should rough weather move in. Pack a tarp and some metal tent stakes and you’ll have the perfect solution for keeping wood, chairs, etc., dry.

3) Moving blanket
If you’re sleeping in a tent but don’t have an air mattress or cot, a moving blanket makes a great layer for the hard ground.  Our Supreme moving blanket is heavy duty and thick, so laying one or two on the tent floor is an easy way to create some cushion. Even if you do use an air mattress or cot, consider adding a few of these blankets to your camping supplies…. you can’t exactly drape an air mattress or cot over you like you can a blanket when you’re sitting around the campfire! And they’re machine-washable so you can simply toss in the washing machine when you get home.

4) Bungee cords
Bungee cords are great for tying down things during transit, but don’t just toss them aside once you’ve set up camp:

  • Bundle firewood and kindling together so they’re easier to carry.
  • Wind up extra slack in hoses or cords to keep them neat and tidy and less prone to tripping over.
  • Use with tent stakes to hold tent flaps, awnings or camper doors open or closed.
  • Create a closthesline to hang wet clothing.
  • Secure tackle boxes and supplies in a boat or canoe.
  • Use it as a shoulder strap for carrying items during a hike.
  • Secure rolled up sleeping bags or moving blankets to save space.
  • Attach around coolers and boxes of food to the critters out.

Pick up these items and more at USCargoControl.com. Got a great camping or outdoor summer tip? Let us know!

How & when to use ratchet straps and cam buckle straps

This video details the difference types of ratchet strap fittings, how to use a ratchet strap, and how ratchet straps and cam buckle straps are different.

Ratchet straps & cam straps

Ratchet straps and cam buckles are used to secure various types of cargo and come in various sizes from 1″ on up to 4″ widths.

The ratchet strap comes with many fittings: chain extensions, d-rings, e-track fitting, e-track double stud fitting, f-track hook and spring e-fitting, flat hook, flat snap hook, j-hook with d-ring, s-hook, and vinyl coated wire hooks.

Polyester webbing is used for cargo securement because of its low stretch rate. It’s also very abrasion-resistant.

How to thread a ratchet strap

To thread a ratchet strap, first open your ratchet a little bit so you have access to the take up spool. Now you slide the strap through the spool and bring it right back around on itself. At this point, pull on the strap to remove the excess slack. Once all the slack is removed you can start to ratchet to the tension you want, keeping the strap straight. Once you have reached your desired tension, lock the ratchet down in its closed position. To release the strap, open the ratchet all the way so it lays completely flat. Once it is flat, is in the release position. Go ahead and pull your strap out.

In some cases you may not need the strength of a ratchet strap. In those cases you would use a cam buckle.

Cam straps come with various fittings: butterfly fittings, e-track fittings, f-track hook and spring e-fittings, handlebar straps with s-hooks, flat snap hooks and s-hooks.

Cam buckles typically come in 1″ and 2″ sizes.

How to thread a cam buckle

To thread a cam buckle, turn the cam buckle over and feed the strap back through while pressing the thumb release. While pressing the thumb release, pull the strap to your desired tension, then release. To remove the strap, press the thumb button and simply pull the strap. You don’t have to pull the strap all the way out, just enough to get to your cargo.

In choosing between a ratchet strap and a cam buckle, it usually comes down to the working load limit, or how fragile the product is. If it is something light and fragile, choose a cam buckle since you’re not able to over-tension and possibly crush the product. If it’s anything heavier, less fragile, a ratchet strap is generally a better choice.