Secure Ratchet Straps Right with the Good-N-Tight®

Get 3x the leverage with Good-N-Tight®

If you or someone you know is looking for a smarter and safer way to secure ratchet straps, the Good-N-Tight® may be just what you need.

This mechanical ratcheting aid makes proper tensioning of 2″, 3″, and 4″ ratchet straps much easier than doing it by hand. With 3x the leverage, the Good-N-Tight® gives just about anybody the ability to tightly secure cargo loads.

Good-N-Safe with the Good-N-Tight®

The Good-N-Tight®  also makes ratchet strap tightening safer. In fact, one chiropractor recommends it as a tool to prevent injuries. The Good-N-Tight® is thought to reduce the stress put on your body (back, shoulders, and elbows) when tightening portable ratchet straps. Unlike winch bars, the Good-N-Tight®  will not slip out and cause injury.

Not only is it safer for your body, it also ensures your cargo loads are fully secure. This leads to safer roadways for everyone.

Even better, the Good-N-Tight® is tax deductible because it’s considered a safety item!

Made of high-strength polycarbonate plastic, the Good-N-Tight®  weighs just 1.5 pounds. But make no mistake, this product is made in the USA and designed to last.

The Many Uses of the Good-N-Tight®

Besides giving you a mechanical advantage when securing ratchet straps, there are numerous other uses of the Good-N-Tight®  that make it a great investment.

1. Check your tire pressure – Tap your tires with the Good-N-Tight®  to quickly ensure they aren’t low on air. Properly inflated tires will make a loud and sharp thud, while poorly inflated tires make a dull thud.

2. Use it as a hammer – You won’t be able to chisel concrete with it, but if you need to drive a nail or tap something flush in a pinch the Good-N-Tight®  is built solid enough to handle it.

3. Personal protection – Hopefully you won’t ever need it for this but, much like a baseball bat, the Good-N-Tight® can serve as a self-defense tool if needed.

5 Tips for Hunting with Your Portable Tree Stand

Whether hunting with a bow or firearm, utilizing a portable tree stand is a popular way to gain an elevated view of approaching game and ensure your scent is not easily detected down below. However, tree stands can result in serious injury without preparation, the appropriate tree stand accessories and proper installation procedures. Add the essential hunting accessories and you’re ready for a good hunt.

Climbing tree stands allow for superior mobility while searching for the optimal spot to blend in and wait. No matter what portable tree stand you choose – even if you make your own – there are safety considerations to remember and best practices to follow. Use these tips the next time you venture out:

  1. Inspect your gear. Before you even leave home, look over all of your equipment and hunting accessories. Check your safety harness and straps for fray or other defects. Make sure the pieces of your stand are in working order. Double check your supply list so you don’t forget to pack any essential tools.
  2. Find the right tree. Locating an ideal tree may take a while unless you’ve previously scouted the area. Trees have to be sturdy enough to support both you and the platform. Live, healthy trees with a sizeable circumference are the goal. Tall and sturdy with no lower branches or loose bark are other preferred features. Some stand manufacturers set restrictions or size specifications. Confirm the area you’re in allows the type of system and accessories you are using. Screw-in styles or steps are frequently not permitted in order to protect trees from permanent damage.
  3. Lock your safety harness to the trunk. Getting your stand set up and safely secured can take a little while. Once you have the top and bottom parts of the stand ready to make the climb, tether your body harness to the trunk with a moveable ratchet strap secured just above the top of the stand. This securement will serve as backup if the stand falls. In addition, a safety strap from your harness to the tree takes some weight and pressure off the stand itself.
  4. Don’t rush the climb. Step onto the bottom part of your stand, which should already be attached to the tree. Once in the stand, you should be able to reposition the tree strap about 12” up the tree and tighten it back onto the tree. Grab the top part of your stand and move it upward, then use your feet to grab the bottom portion of the stand and lift that up, as well. Repeat this process a number of times until you feel you have a good overview of your area that’s out of a target’s line of sight, yet within your desired shooting distance. Descend the tree by simply reversing these instructions. Never carry your firearm or bow while climbing. Keep these items on the ground, perhaps in a bag, tethered to the top of the tree stand with a strap or a rope that you can pull up to you once you’ve secured your tree stand to where you plan to perch during the hunt.
  5. Check the local weather forecast. Know what conditions to expect. Temperature and precipitation affect how readily you can reach your tree stand, and influence the ability to see, hear and track your prey. Also, dress appropriately. Especially in high altitudes, a warm day can turn into a freezing cold night. If necessary, carry a blanket to bunker down with.

Keep these safety tips in mind to help guarantee a successful and injury-free harvest season. US Cargo Control carries a variety of hunting accessories such as camo blankets and camo safety straps with choices of hooks and ratchets for your unique needs. Call us anytime with questions: 888-719-4020.

Customer Photos: Ratchet Straps

We love to feature product photos we get from our customers. We received this one from Elaine on Galveston Island, Texas, after she let us know how pleased she and her husband were with our ratchet straps. Elaine purchased our 2″ x 30′ blue ratchet strap with chain extensions.

 

ratchet strap with chain extension

 

“We have a Bobcat business, Jim Abrams Bobcat Services. We now have two machines that we trailer to our job sites, and we’re VERY pleased with the US Cargo products. In fact, our friends own an equipment rental business and have asked just where we get our tie down ratchet straps. Our equipment DEALER commented that ours were the biggest and best he had EVER seen. They were very impressed, especially with the chain leads.

We recently purchased a new compact tractor and new flatbed trailer.  We already have a large Kubota SVL75 skid steer front end loader.  My husband has been a heavy equipment operator for 40 years and I now have a unit of my own to go out and help him do some specialized work.  (At age 65 I am starting a whole new career!)  

My husband does a lot of research online and no one came close to your ratchet straps–it was EXACTLY what he wanted. 

Elaine Forbes
Jim Abrams Bobcat Services, LLC

How to Use a Ratchet Strap

Some of the most common questions we receive from our customers are about the use of a ratchet strap. Along with questions about break strengths, working load limits, and safety guidelines, are those about how to use these versatile tie down straps:  “How to thread a ratchet strap,” “How to release a ratchet strap,” or something similar. If you’ve never used one of these versatile tie down straps, assembling one for the first time can be confusing.

You can check out this video about ratchet straps and cam straps, which shows how to put together an assembly. We’ve also created the handy photo demonstration below for quick and easy reference.

All of our ratchet straps are DOT-approved and are manufactured with labels attached that include break strength and work load limit information. They also meet several requirements, including:

  • Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA)  guidelines
  • Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations
  • Web Sling & Tie Down Association (WSTDA)
  • California Highway Patrol (CHP)
  • North American Cargo Securement

To see our full line of tie downs, visit our Ratchet Straps & Tie Downs page.

 

infographic for how to use a ratchet strap

 

How to Use an Endless Cam Buckle Strap

Like ratchet straps, cam buckle straps are great for securing a load. But the method of tightening with a cam buckle strap makes it less likely that you’ll over-tighten and damage cargo. Cam buckles are tightened by pulling the strap rather than with a ratcheting action, so the strap can be tensioned only as tight as your strength allows.

Cam straps are ideal for securing cargo on a pallet, trailer, or in a truck, but they’re also a great all-purpose strap for use around the home, shop, garage, farm, etc. An endless cam buckle strap is a one-piece design so it’s easy to use and to store.

The strap featured in the video below is a 1″ x 15″ endless cam buckle strap, but custom sizes and widths are available by calling our sales team at 866-444-9990.

How To Tie Down an ATV Using Ratchet Straps

Ratchet straps are an easy and fast way to secure an ATV for transport, and generally range in size from 1″ to 4″ wide. For best results, be sure to choose a ratchet strap with an adequate working load limit (WLL) to secure the weight of your vehicle.

Once your ATV is on the trailer and the parking break is engaged, begin by taking the long end of the strap and feed it up and through the frame of the ATV. The frame is the most stable part to tie down; do not wrap the strap around the axles or any other moving part that is vulnerable to bending or breaking.

After the ratchet straps are secured to the trailer, it’s important to pull the slack out of the strap before you begin ratcheting. Spooling too much webbing around the shaft which will not allow you to tie it down securely. While holding the strap end tightly, ratchet to tighten. Wrap any excess strapping around the taut strap to keep it from blowing during transit.

Secure your ATV with four tie down points- two in the front and two in the back- to prevent forward, backward, and side-to-side movement.

It’s also a good idea to check your state DOT regulations for any additional rules and regulations for transporting an ATV.

How & when to use ratchet straps and cam buckle straps

This video details the difference types of ratchet strap fittings, how to use a ratchet strap, and how ratchet straps and cam buckle straps are different.

Ratchet straps & cam straps

Ratchet straps and cam buckles are used to secure various types of cargo and come in various sizes from 1″ on up to 4″ widths.

The ratchet strap comes with many fittings: chain extensions, d-rings, e-track fitting, e-track double stud fitting, f-track hook and spring e-fitting, flat hook, flat snap hook, j-hook with d-ring, s-hook, and vinyl coated wire hooks.

Polyester webbing is used for cargo securement because of its low stretch rate. It’s also very abrasion-resistant.

How to thread a ratchet strap

To thread a ratchet strap, first open your ratchet a little bit so you have access to the take up spool. Now you slide the strap through the spool and bring it right back around on itself. At this point, pull on the strap to remove the excess slack. Once all the slack is removed you can start to ratchet to the tension you want, keeping the strap straight. Once you have reached your desired tension, lock the ratchet down in its closed position. To release the strap, open the ratchet all the way so it lays completely flat. Once it is flat, is in the release position. Go ahead and pull your strap out.

In some cases you may not need the strength of a ratchet strap. In those cases you would use a cam buckle.

Cam straps come with various fittings: butterfly fittings, e-track fittings, f-track hook and spring e-fittings, handlebar straps with s-hooks, flat snap hooks and s-hooks.

Cam buckles typically come in 1″ and 2″ sizes.

How to thread a cam buckle

To thread a cam buckle, turn the cam buckle over and feed the strap back through while pressing the thumb release. While pressing the thumb release, pull the strap to your desired tension, then release. To remove the strap, press the thumb button and simply pull the strap. You don’t have to pull the strap all the way out, just enough to get to your cargo.

In choosing between a ratchet strap and a cam buckle, it usually comes down to the working load limit, or how fragile the product is. If it is something light and fragile, choose a cam buckle since you’re not able to over-tension and possibly crush the product. If it’s anything heavier, less fragile, a ratchet strap is generally a better choice.