How to Thread Ratchet Straps and Cam Buckle Straps

While both ratchet straps and cam buckle straps are used to haul various types of cargo and come in sizes ranging from 1″ to 4″ in width, there are some key differences between the two.

Ratchet straps

A ratchet strap is available with many different fittings: chain extension, d-ring, e-track fitting, e-track double stud fitting, f-track hook and spring e-fitting, flat hook, flat snap hook, j-hook with d-ring, s-hook and vinyl coated wire hook.

Polyester webbing is most often used for both ratchet straps and cam buckle straps because it has a low stretch rate and is very resistant to abrasion.

How to thread a ratchet strap

1.) Open the ratchet so you have access to the take-up spool.

2.) Slide strap through the spool and bring it right back on itself.

3.) Pull on the strap to remove the excess slack.

4.) Once the slack is removed, you can start to ratchet the strap to the desired tension, keeping the strap straight.

5.) Once you have reached your desired tension, lock the ratchet down to its closed position.

To release the strap, open the ratchet all the way so it is completely flat and pull the strap out.

In cases where you do not need the strength of a ratchet strap, a cam buckle is an excellent choice. Cam straps are also available with various types of attachment hardware: butterfly fitting, e-track fitting, F-track hook and spring e-fitting, handle bar strap with S-hook, flat snap hook and s-hook.

Cam buckle straps 

Cam buckle straps typically come in 1″ and 2″ sizes. This video highlights the differences between ratchet straps and cam buckles and also shows how to thread a cam buckle.

How to thread a cam buckle strap

1.) Turn the cam buckle over and thread your strap back through  while pressing the thumb release.

2.) While pressing the thumb release, pull the strap to your desired tension and then release.

To release the strap, press the thumb button and simply pull the strap.

In choosing between a ratchet strap and a cam buckle, it generally depends on work load limit or how fragile the product is that you are securing. If the cargo is light and fragile, go with a cam buckle since you cannot run the risk of over-tightening and crushing the product. For items heavier or more sturdy, a ratchet strap is a good choice.

How to Thread a Toothless Cam Buckle

Cam buckles can be confusing to thread webbing onto for the first time. This video explains the proper procedure for feeding webbing onto a 1″ toothless cam buckle. Cam buckles come in all different sizes, so make sure the strength of your buckle is appropriate for the item you are securing. US Cargo Control shows you the right way to thread a strap through the buckle.

Threading a toothless cam buckle involves 4 basic steps:

  1. Open the buckle and feed the webbing between the guides.
  2. Loop the webbing back through the buckle.
  3. Next, feed the webbing through the slot in the mandrel and pull it tight.
  4. Close the buckle, and now the webbing is in place.

For more information or to purchase the items used in this video, click on the links below.

 

View all tie down hardware from US Cargo Control

L-Track Fittings: Small But Mighty

What’s round, measures less than 2″ high, yet has the ability to withstand up to 4,000 lbs. of pressure? A single L-track fitting with round ring.

This simple workhorse is easy to install- just attach the round airline track single base using screws and click the fitting into the recessed area. But more importantly, these little pieces are big on versatility. While longer L-track sections – such as the popular 24 inch aluminum L-track rail – are traditionally used on a trailer to secure motorcycles and ATVs with 2-inch tie down straps, these single L-track fittings can be placed anywhere you need an anchor point. They’re the perfect solution if you’re short on space and a full track length won’t fit, such as behind a wheel well in a trailer, or if placing a full track isn’t an ideal option, such as on the tailgate of a pickup truck.

But don’t limit L-track singles to just a trailer or truck: use them in the garage, shed, utility room, barn- the possibilities are endless. Attach one to the garage wall, add a cinch strap  to the ring and you instantly have a place to hang hoses, rope, cords, wire, etc. The round ring can also accommodate a bungee cord or rubber tarp strap hook for lots of lighter duty applications. And the strength capacity makes them great for securing heavier items as well. In fact, manufacturing shops attach these single anchor points on carts to secure items for transport within the facility, so consider them of use on an ATV, utility tractor, etc.

The L-track name comes from the term “logistic track” and is sometimes also referred to as L track or airline track, because it’s used in the airline industry to secure seating components. The longer track pieces are ideal if you need an adjustable anchor point, as it’s designed with several indentions for the fitting to secure. However, when space is tight and there not enough room for an entire track length, a single l-track fitting is the perfect solution.

Watch this video: How to install a motorcycle tie down system in a pickup truck using logistic track, for more information.