New Product Line Alert: Crosby® Chain Slings

The full line of Crosby® chain slings, including adjustable chain slings with the revolutionary Crosby Eliminator® system, is now available through USCC.

American-made 1-leg, 2-leg, 3-leg, and 4-leg chain slings now available through USCC in standard and adjustable styles.

crosby single leg chain sling
crosby 2-leg chain sling
crosby 3-leg chain slings
crosby 4-leg chain sling

The full line of Crosby® chain slings, including adjustable chain slings with the revolutionary Crosby Eliminator ® system, is now available from US Cargo Control. These premium rigging slings are 100% made in America using high-strength grade 100 chain. As an authorized Crosby® distributor, we’re proud to be one of a small number of distributors to offer these slings.

The Crosby® Difference

There’s a reason US Cargo Control offers a number of different Crosby® rigging and lifting products; they’re extremely innovative and built to last. From forging massive rigging shackles that are strong enough to lift the Statue of Liberty to non-marring lifting clamps that are gentle enough to lift sheets of glass, Crosby® has been a leading manufacturer of rigging and lifting equipment for well over a hundred years. Professionals worldwide look to them to set the standard for quality, training, and technical expertise in their field.

Because Crosby® handles all manufacturing in-house (including forging, assembly, and finishing), they are in complete control of their product and its quality. Check out the video below to learn more about how the Crosby® rigging hardware supply chain works compared to other supply chains with outsourced manufacturers.

source: Crosby®

What’s the Big Deal About the Crosby Eliminator®?

One of the most noticeable ways that the Crosby® line of chain slings stands out is in the new Crosby Eliminator® component found on Crosby® adjustable chain slings. This revolutionary chain sling fitting is designed to save riggers time and money by combining features and functionality of a master link, connecting link, grab hook, and adjuster legs.

crosby eliminator
Crosby® Eliminator with double hook

Like other adjustable chain slings, adjustment of the chain length leg can be accomplished by placing the chain in the connector link. Where the Crosby Eliminator® differs is in the fact that it comes in both single hook and double hook styles. With single and double-leg Crosby® adjustable slings, the top bail Eliminator® serves as the master link, which removes the need for an additional master link. Three and four-leg Crosby® slings need only one master link to connect the two Eliminator® fittings. This results in a simpler and lighter chain sling with strength and durability that rivals any competitor.

source: Crosby®

Crosby® Chain Sling Hook Options

There are several hook options for you to choose from. Give our sales team a call to understand all the options for custom chain slings.

Sling Hook

As the name suggests, sling hooks are commonly used at the ends of slings and wire rope. They have a large throat and are typically self-locking to avoid disconnect.

Foundry Hook

Foundry hooks have a wider opening than most other hooks which allow them to hold a wide range of attachments and help prevent load tipping.

Self-Locking Hook

Self-locking hooks are designed with safety in mind as their latches automatically close and lock under the weight of the load.

Grab Hook

Grab hooks are commonly used as shortening hooks in choke applications. They have a much more narrow opening which makes them ideal for attaching to chain.

hook options for crosby chain slings
From left to right: sling hook, foundry hook, self-locking hook, grab hook

Unsure which type of lifting sling you need? Check out our post on How to Choose a Lifting Sling and learn more about the difference between standard and adjustable chain slings.

When you’re ready to start lifting with these high-quality Crosby® chain slings, head over to the USCC website or give our sales team a call at 800-404-7068.

Chain Grades: Comparing Grade 30, Grade 43, Grade 70, Grade 80, Grade 100, and Grade 120 Chain

We turned one our most popular posts, “What are the Differences Between Grade 70 Chain, Grade 80 Chain, Grade 100 Chain, and Grade 120 Chain?”, into a simple chart for quick and easy chain grade comparison.

We also added information on the Grade 30 chain and Grade 43 chain. While we don’t sell these chain grades on our website, you can always call in to order them.

chain grade information

Typical Chain Uses

Grade 30

General purpose economical chain. Used in a variety of industries and jobs including light construction, agricultural applications, and the marine industry.

Grade 43

Typically used for container securement, logging, farming, towing, marine applications, and as general purpose utility chain.

Grade 70

Made from a higher strength, heat-treated carbon steel that has a load rating approximately 20 percent higher than Grade 43. The gold chromate finish makes it easy for DOT officials to recognize. Typically used by truckers, loggers, and highway crews for load securement and towing.

Grade 80

A high strength, heat treated alloy chain that can be used as a sling component for overhead lifting as well as heavy duty tow chain. The most economical choice that is suitable for overhead lifting.

Grade 100

A high strength, heat treated alloy chain. Primarily used as a sling component for overhead lifting.  Has approximately 25 percent higher strength than Grade 80. Popular in construction, manufacturing, and rigging applications.

Grade 120

An ultra-premium high strength chain designed specifically for the rigorous requirements of overhead lifting applications. The links have a unique square shape and it has approximately 50 percent higher strength compared to Grade 80. There are currently no official standards for Grade 120 chain in the U.S. or Europe, however, it does meet or exceed the standards of Grade 100 chain.

chain working load limits

Safety Standards for Chain

Organizations like ASTM (American Society of Testing & Materials), ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers), and OSHA (Occupational Safety & Health Administration) have released safety standards and regulations for various materials and grades of a chain.  

Essentially, it’s a formal way of recognizing and documenting that not all chain is created equally and therefore, it should not all be used for the same applications. 

ASTM Chain Specification 

What does A413, A391, and A973 all mean? Those are simply how the ASTM categorizes and references their specification standards. Each specification outlines the different manufacturing and testing requirements as well as the appropriate performance standards, grades, and applications.  

Determining Chain Grades

Chain grades are a standard method for showing the ultimate breaking strength (tensile strength) of a chain. Grades help determine what sort of applications are appropriate for a given chain. 

Chain grades are determined by calculating newtons per square millimeter, using the formula “N/mm2”.

Where “mm” is the area of the two cross-sections of a single chain link, and “N” is newtons. A newton is approximately 0.224805 lbs. 

So, to determine a chain grade, manufacturers must find the ultimate breaking strength. Then, divide that number by .224805 to determine ultimate breaking strength in newtons. Next, take that number and divide by the total area of two cross-sections of a single link. That number is the chain grade. 

You could reverse this formula to determine ultimate breaking strength if all you know if the chain grade.  

Note: chain grades advertised by manufacturers are one-tenth of the actual mathematical grades. So grade 80 is really 800, and grade 120 is 1,200. 

Determining Chain Working Load Limits

Working load limit (WLL) of a chain is another designated safety measure. WLL is a weight significantly less than the weight that would cause a chain to fail (tensile strength).

WLL = MBL / SF. Where MBL is minimum breaking load and SF is the safety factor.  

A safety factor is the ratio between allowable stress and actual stress. In other words, it’s the ratio between the chain strength and the expected maximum stress.

In lifting and rigging applications, factors such as gravity and the additional force caused by angles must be considered.  

Always adhere to the WLL to ensure a chain does not break or wear quicker than it should.  

Working Load Limits of Chain

Grade 70 transport chain from US Cargo ControlWhether you transport machinery, use tow chains, or are in the logging industry, it’s important to know the working load limits of chain you are using. Chains have a working load limit- or WLL- of approximately one third of their break strengths (the amount of force the chains can withstand before they break).

How to determine a chain’s working load limit

The WLL of a chain is determined by both the grade and the diameter. Chain is embossed with both the grade and size so you can determine its WLL using this chart.

new chart

 

Types of chain

Grade 30 Chain

Grade 30 is a multipurpose, economical chain. Also known as Grade 30 Proof Coil Chain, it’s used in a variety of industries and jobs, including light construction, barrier chains, and in the marine industry. It is not safe for overhead lifting. Grade 30 chain is embossed using a 3, 30, or 300.

Grade 43 Chain

Also called Grade 43 High Test Chain  or Grade 43 Tow Chain, this is common in the towing and logging industries. It is not rated safe for overhead lifting. Grade 43 chain is embossed using a 43 or a G4.shutterstock_2337463

Grade 70 Chain

Grade 70 Transport Chain is also called Grade 70 Truckers Chain as it’s common in securing loads for over-the-road hauling. It is not rated safe for overhead lifting. Grade 70 chain is embossed using a 7, 70, or 700.

Grade 80 Chain

Grade 80 Alloy Chain is heat-treated making it safe and rated for overhead lifting. It’s also commonly used as a heavy duty tow chain. Grade 80 chain is embossed using an 8, 80, or 800.

Grade 100 Chain

Considered premium quality chain, it offers about a 25% higher work load limit over Grade 80 chain. It is safe for overhead lifting. Grade 100 chains are embossed with a 10 or 100.

Grade 120 Chain

A newer product in the market, Grade 120 chain is up to 50% stronger than Grade 80 chain and 20% stronger than Grade 100 chain. It’s also more resistant to abrasion than both Grade 80 and Grade 100 chains. It’s safe  for overhead lifts.

LEARN MORE: 

Learn more about the differences between grades 70, 80 and 100 here: What are the Differences Between Grade 70 Chain, Grade 80 Chain, and Grade 100 Chain?

SHOP NOW: 

What are the Differences Between Grade 70 Chain, Grade 80 Chain, Grade 100 Chain, and Grade 120 Chain?

A common question our sales team hears from customers is “What are the differences between grade 70 chain, grade 80 chain, grade 100 chain, and grade 120 chain?”

Note: to view a complete chain grade comparison chart and WLL chart, see our recent chain grade overview post.

Grade 70 chain

image of grade 70 transport chain / truckers chain from US Cargo Control

Grade 70 chain is transport chain manufactured in heat-treated carbon steel. As the name suggests, it’s used as tie downs on over-the-road trailers so it’s also known as truckers chain. It’s never to be used for overhead lifting. Grade 70 chain generally features a gold chromate finish so it’s easy to recognize and to meet California Highway Patrol and DOT requirements. In addition to transport uses, it’s also commonly used in towing, logging, oil rigs, and safety chain applications.

Grade 70 chain is embossed with 7, 70, or 700.

 

Grade 80 chain

Grade 80 chain is a heat-treated steel chain with a high strength to weight ratio. Its strength makes it safe for overhead lifting and lifting slings. It’s also excellent for uses such as recovery, safety, and towing chains. Grade 80 chain is also becoming more common in the flatbed trucking industry to secure heavy duty industrial loads. Because these types of chains are generally equipped with a specific type of clevis grab hook, Grade 80 tie down chain assemblies are not approved for overhead lifting.

Grade 80 alloy chain is embossed with 8, 80, or 800.

 

Grade 100 chain

Grade 100 chain is a newer product and is becoming increasingly popular as a replacement for grade 80 chain. Considered premium quality by chain manufacturers, it provides about 25% higher work load limits than grade 80 chain and is approved for overhead lifting applications. Due to the added strength of grade 100 chain over grade 80 chain, it’s becoming more widely used to secure flatbed loads since a smaller-sized chain can be used without sacrificing working load limit capacities. However, because these chains are generally equipped with a specific type of clevis grab hook, Grade 100 tie down chain assemblies are not approved for overhead lifting.

Grade 100 alloy chain is embossed with 10, 100, or 1000.

 

Grade 120 chain

Grade 120 chainimage of grade 120 chain from US Cargo Control is also a newer category of high performance chain, offering the highest strength in the industry. The square link style creates increased contact between the bearing surfaces on the links, which reduces pressure on the chain. This translates to work load limits that are 50% higher than grade 80 chain, and 20% higher than grade 100 chain. Chain grade 120 is approved for overhead lifting. It’s important to note that as with Grade 80 tie down chain assemblies and Grade 100 tie down chain assemblies, Grade 120 tie down chain assemblies are also not safe for overhead lifting due to the type of hooks used.

Grade 120 chains have a bright blue finish to make them easily recognizable.

 

 

 

Regardless of the type of chain, all must adhere to standards set by the National Association of Chain Manufacturers (NACM), which include:

• Chain lifted loads should never to be transported or suspended over people.

• All chains should be periodically inspected for cracks, gouges, wear, elongation, nicks, and suitability.

• Excessive temperatures or exposure to chemically active environments such as acids or corrosive liquids or fumes can reduce a chain’s performance.

• If chains are to be used outside the recommended temperature range ( -40 °F to 400 °F), the user should first consult the chain’s manufacturer.

• If the thickness at any location on the link is less than the listed minimum value, all chain should be removed from service.

• When mixing chain or component types, all should be rated at the working load limit of the lowest rated component or chain.

US Cargo Control offers a full line of grade 70 transport chain, grade 80 chain, grade 100 chain, grade 120 chain, as well as chain slings.

 

Questions? Give our sales team a call at  866-444-9990. They will be happy to help or place an order for you.