WSTDA COVID-19 Guidance For Synthetic Slings and Tie Downs

WSTDA releases guidance for COVID-19.

The Web Sling and Tie Down Association (WSTDA) recently released guidance on disinfecting synthetic slings and tie-downs to prevent the transmission of COVID-19.

In general, it is not recommended that web slings and tie-downs be washed or disinfected as it can lead to a loss of strength. Many chemicals and cleaners commonly used to disinfect other inanimate household objects could have adverse effects on synthetic slings and tie-downs.

We understand there are a lot of questions and unknowns when it comes to the Coronavirus pandemic and encourage our customers to read the full release from the WSTDA on their website.

At US Cargo Control, we care about our customers and getting them what they want, when they need it. If you have any questions about our products, give our team a call at 866-444-9990.

Stay safe everyone!

New Products Alert: Recoil-less Cam Action Lever Binder and Ratchet Chain Binder

The Recoil-less Cam Action Lever Binder and Heavy Duty Ratchet Chain Binder are now available at US Cargo Control

The Recoil-less Cam Action Lever Binder and Heavy-Duty Ratchet Chain Binder are now available on the USCC website!

You can now purchase the Recoil-Less Cam Action Lever Binder in a single quantity or 5-pack, and the Heavy-Duty Ratchet Chain Binder in a single quantity or 4-pack from US Cargo Control. And get this, we are offering a 10% discount for these products from now until January 19th!

The price will be automatically discounted at checkout, so no promotion code is required. Get yours now!

What is a Chain Binder?

A chain binder is a tool used to tighten chain to secure cargo to a trailer for transport. When shopping for chain binders, there are commonly two styles: the ratchet binder and the lever binder.

Recoil-less Cam Action Lever Binder 5/16″ – 3/8″

Lever chain binder
Lever binder lock

This is the first recoil-less cam action lever binder we offer, and this binder is one of the safest lever binders on the market today. Known as a recoil-less safety lever binder, it features a center cam that can rotate freely of the end hooks and its unique design eliminates the whiplash that occurs when the chain tension is released. This allows the lever binder to use leverage to tighten the chain and secure cargo.

The other standard lever-type binders present a safety concern because when you release the binder, it often kicks back and makes it dangerous for your cargo and you. Unlike this recoil-less lever binder, the 360-degree swivel motion handle is super quick, easy to operate, and requires no tools.

Lever type load binder
Load binder

Our lever load binder has a working load limit of 6,600 pounds, compared to standard lever binders’ working load limit of 5,400 pounds. When using this, use our transport chains:

5/16″ Grade 70 Transport Chain

3/8″ Grade 70 Transport Chain

5/16″ Grade 80 Transport Chain

Heavy Duty Ratchet Chain Binder

Heavy duty chain binder
load binder chain

Our Heavy Duty Ratchet Chain Binder is built for durability and maximum strength. These chain binders utilize a ratcheting mechanism to create tension in the chain and secure its load. The forged steel handle offers maximum leverage, while the cam and pawl design allows for easier and faster securement.

It features a ratchet handle and two tension hooks on each end. The ratchet chain binder comes in sizes 5/16″ and 3/8″ and a working load limit of 6,600 pounds. When looking for chains, use the heavy-duty ratchet chain binder with 5/16″ Grade 70 Transport Chain or 3/8″ Grade 70 Transport Chain.

What is the Difference between Grades of Chains?

Source: US Cargo Control

When you’re ready to secure your cargo load with chain binders, go to US Cargo Control or give our sales team a call at 800-969-6543.

Working Load Limit, Breaking Strength & Safety Factor: What Do They Mean?

Ever saw random numbers on your load-bearing equipment and didn’t know what they mean? Read to learn what working load limit, break strength, and safety factor mean.

Have you picked up a ratchet strap and saw numbers labeled on the strap, and wonder what they mean? Chances are you’re reading the working load limit or break strength. Every piece of load-bearing equipment states these requirements to let you know how much weight that piece of rigging is capable of securing.

When it comes to securing fragile or heavy loads, it is crucial that the product can secure the load without breaking. Although these terms are normally stated, there is confusion about what these terms mean. Read on below to learn what working load limit, break strength, and safety factor mean.

What Does Working Load Limit Mean?

shackle displaying the wll
Displaying a Shackle with the Working Load Limit

Many people ask about the working load limit, and this is a term to not mix up with breaking strength. Abbreviated as WLL, it is the rating that should never be exceeded when using a product like a ratchet strap. Before using a piece of load-bearing equipment, always make sure to look at the working load limit before use as it is the maximum allowable loading force.

Something to keep in mind is the working load limit is always 1/3 of the breaking strength. So if a ratchet strap has a breaking strength of 15,000 pounds, then the strap will have a working load limit of 5,000 pounds.

To learn how to secure your cargo, read how to use tie downs to secure cargo loads safely and legally.

If the Working Load Limit is Included, is the Break Strength Important?

breaking strength meaning displayed on our tag
Displaying a custom strap with the Break Strength and Working Load Limit

The break strength is equally as important as the working load limit. The break strength refers to the point at which your load-bearing equipment will fail. It is expressed in pounds and/or kilograms, and will actually fail if you go over the required amount.

When a ratchet strap is made with webbing, end fittings, and a ratchet all with a 10,000-pound breaking strength, then the break strength of the overall product will stay 10,000 pounds. However, if the same strap has a ratchet with an 8,000-pound break strength, then that would reduce the product’s strength to 8,000.

What is the Correlation with Safety Factor?

factor of safety, what is factor of safety?
Multiple tie downs securing cargo loads

Safety factor, also known as Design Factor, determines the ratio between the working load limit and break strength. The working load limit’s rating should never exceed when using a sling or tiedown, and this safety factor provides an allowance for shock loading, G force, and other unforeseen factors.

How Do I Know my Load-Bearing Equipment is Failing?

To make sure your lifting equipment is performing its best, perform an inspection. If you see any damage to the product, dispose of it. To give you an insight into what kind of damage you can potentially see, read these examples:

  • Holes, tears, cuts, snags, or embedded particles
  • Broken or worn stitching
  • Abrasive wear
  • Bending
  • Melting, charring, or weld spatter
  • Acid or alkali burns
  • Any other visible damage which causes doubt to the strength of the equipment

When selecting a ratchet strap, lifting sling, shackle, or any other product, select the product that has suitable characteristics for the type of load, environment, and attachment to the vehicle.

At US Cargo Control, we want you to be safe when securing heavy loads. If you have any questions about the safety requirements, give our team a call at 800-404-7068.

3 Accessories Every Enclosed Trailer Hauler Should Have

Make sure you have these three items to secure and protect your cargo load for the long haul.

Whether you’re hauling items in an enclosed trailer or van, here’s what you need to ensure your cargo arrives intact.

When driving an enclosed trailer, it might seem that there is little to worry about. Unless you forget to close a door, your cargo won’t be flying out of the trailer or exposed to outside elements anytime soon. So why even bother to secure your cargo, right?

Although enclosed trailers offer inherent protection that flatbed trailers can’t, there is still a strong chance you will experience damaged cargo at some point, and securing your cargo with the proper equipment is the quickest and smartest way to prevent this.

Make sure you have these three items to secure and protect your cargo load for the long haul.

1. Moving Blankets

Moving blankets, also known as moving pads or packing blankets, provide a thick covering that helps prevent damage to your cargo or valuables. Moving blankets can prevent dents, scratches, or abrasions that can occur while you are driving and your cargo is potentially shifting. For even better results, consider using ratchet straps, moving straps, or another type of tie-down to secure the load better.

These blankets come in quantities of a single pack, 4-pack, or 12-pack, and they are very durable and machine washable. What is also unique about our selection of moving blankets is that you can choose from various fabrics, weights, and binding materials. This choice allows you to select the moving blanket that is best for your needs.

2. E-Track Straps

E-Track straps are common straps to use for cargo securement in enclosed trailers. You can use these straps in trailers, cargo vans, moving vans, enclosed semi-trailers, and other applications. These are different from an L-Track strap as L-Track has a lower profile and are typically used in a pick-up truck. E-Track is more heavy-duty and overall stronger. This makes it a great installment to use to keep your valuable cargo, equipment, and even vehicles tied down during transport.

We carry E-Track Ratchet Straps and E-Track Cam Buckle Straps, in 2′, 5’, 8′ and 10’ sections. They come in colors yellow, blue, and grey.

Learn more about the differences between L Track Straps and E Track Straps

3. Cargo Nets

Besides straps and moving blankets, we also carry cargo nets that will keep cargo from moving during transport. Also known as a bungee net, they can be easily attached to nearly any section of your enclosed trailer. We carry heavy-duty cargo nets used for enclosed trailers and light-duty cargo nets that are used for pick-up trucks. The other difference between these nets is that the heavy-duty cargo net is made of 2″ black polyester webbing with a break strength of 10,000 lbs and the light-duty cargo net is either made of a high-quality bungee material or a tough, 2” wide polyester webbing.

If you cannot find a cargo net that meets your needs, we can create a custom net for your specific needs! To learn more about the cargo nets we carry and create, watch the video below.

Source: US Cargo Control

We also carry load bars and cargo bars, D- rings, and L-Track systems. Learn more about all the Enclosed Trailer Accessories we carry on our website.

Or, call our team of experts at 800-404-7068 if you have any questions or need more information.

5 Tips for Staying Awake While You Are on the Road

Whether you are a new driver or an experienced driver, check out these tips that can help you power through the long haul.

We get it, driving during the long haul can be tedious

Staying awake during long drives can be incredibly boring and exhausting. You sit still for long periods of time, you don’t have anyone to keep you company, and you never know if there will even be any scenic views.

Although it can be dull at times, there are ways to fight that fatigue. Whether you are a new driver or an experienced driver, check out these tips that can help you power through the long haul.

1. Cat Nap

truck driver taking a nap
Photo Courtesy of Adobe Stock

Do not try to fight fatigue just to save time. It might seem better to get there faster, but you will likely put others or yourself in danger. Instead, take a power nap before the drive or pull over while en route. Resting for at least 20 minutes can give you a big boost of energy, and will make you alert for a lot longer. Not only will you feel refreshed, but this can also help fight off sleepiness down the road.

2. Crank up the AC

turning down the AC
Photo Courtesy of Adobe Stock

When we go to sleep, we like it best when we are warm and comfortable. But did you know warmer temperatures can make you drowsy? A warm truck makes it easier for your body to relax and drift off to sleep, so dial down on the heat. Keep your truck cold, but just enough to make it slightly uncomfortable. The colder temperatures will make it harder to sleep and will keep you more alert.

Another tip: open your windows and smell the fresh air. Doing this can give you a little jolt to keep you awake.

3. Eat Something Healthy and Stay Hydrated

water bottle pack to stay hydrated
Photo Courtesy of Adobe Stock

We all do it – binging on candy, fast food, energy drinks, etc. Although it is nice to treat yourself every once in a while, this won’t help you stay awake while driving in the long haul. You may even start to feel sluggish and sick if you continue to eat unhealthy food. Make sure to eat meals that have protein and fiber, and you will have long-lasting stamina. Your body will thank you!

Getting that cup of coffee or some sort of caffeine can give you a nice boost every once in a while, but don’t forget to keep drinking water. It is another way to fight off fatigue and keep your body in check. Have a water bottle nearby, and if you need a snack, try eating fruits and vegetables as they are full of water and natural sugars that can keep you awake.

4. Turn on the Radio

using radio to listen
Photo Courtesy of Adobe Stock

Pick something interesting and different to listen to every once in a while! Listening to different music stations and talk shows can help combat boredom and keep you entertained along the way. You can use the radio to catch up with current news and trends, or if you have a smartphone, use it to play podcasts and learn about anything that gets your attention.

5. Take Breaks or Get Some Exercise

close up of a person walking
Photo Courtesy of Adobe Stock

Even if it is a five-minute walk, exercise will help to get your blood pumping after sitting. Sitting too long can create health concerns and decrease productivity, and will also make it harder to sleep at night. Some simple exercises to try daily are push-ups, sit-ups, jogging or running, jump rope, or simply taking a walk. Whatever it is, make sure to take those breaks and move around.

Thank you, truck drivers, for all your hard work

Although it can be difficult fighting that drowsiness, we thank you for all your hard work and dedication to delivering the goods we all depend on. We recognize that it is not an easy job, but we appreciate all that you do. Check out our previous blog post that covers a popular annual event celebrating truck drivers.

Watch USCC’s video below that was shared last week for Truck Driver Appreciation Week!

Source: US Cargo Control

5 Pieces of Flatbed Trailer Equipment Every Driver Should Have

We carry quality products to keep you and your flatbed trailer moving forward. Check out the five most popular pieces of equipment made for flatbed owners.

From corner protectors to tire chains, we have the flatbed equipment for your trailer to keep you running smoothly

Being a flatbed trailer owner, you know there is not much your trailer cannot hold. Your load is exposed, and you need the equipment to hold it down tight while protecting it from abrasions or damage. Whether you’re a new flatbed truck driver or an experienced one, we carry supplies that can help you deliver your cargo load safely and on time.

Tire Chains

These tire chains, also known as snow tire chains, are designed to help transport you and your cargo to your destination through snowy or icy conditions. These snow chains provide added control behind the wheel when you’re stuck in the snow, and allow better traction as well.

We carry light-duty tire chains and heavy-duty tire chains. The difference is in how you plan on using these types of chains. If you think you will rarely use a tire chain during the cold months, consider the light-duty chain. If you know you will be using chains frequently, then you might want to invest in a heavy-duty chain.

Keep in mind that even if you don’t travel regularly in winter conditions, some states do have DOT regulations requiring drivers to carry or use tire chains during the winter season. So make sure to carry tire chains in your vehicle during the chilly months.

Tarps

Tarps are one of the best ways to protect your cargo load. We carry heavy- duty tarps that fight against elements such as rain and snow. Not only can they combat certain weather situations, but these tarp covers can also prevent scratches and marks on your precious cargo. These truck tarps contain two or three rows of d-rings across the length of the tarp, so the tarp can be tied down firmly to the truck bed. Some of the different types of tarps we carry are lumber tarps, steel tarps, machinery tarps, smoke and nose tarps, and more.

We even create custom flatbed tarps at our facility in Urbana, IA. In this video, Adam explains how our team creates long-lasting custom tarps at your convenience.

Corner Protectors & Vee Boards

Corner protectors are an inexpensive way to protect your cargo. Not only can they protect your cargo from being smashed or damaged, but these guards can also protect your straps, chains, and tarps. They are designed to protect the tarp material from any ripping or abrasions caused by sharp corners. The purpose behind these wall corner guards is providing a layer between the cargo and the strap or chain, and having this extra layer can decrease the pressure on the load from the strap/chain.

Learn more about which corner protector to use for your cargo.

Fun fact: the plastic corner protectors can extend the life of your ratchet straps by reducing rubbing.

Winch Straps & Ratchet Straps

Both ratchet straps and winch straps work well for heavy tie down applications for the trucking industry. The only differences are in how to tighten the straps, and what type of lock the two straps carry.

When using the ratchet strap, you slide the strap to the spool, bring it back over on itself, and pull the strap. After this, you can start to ratchet and repeatedly crank the lever until the load is tightened. Both tie-down types are available with a flat hook, wire hook, chain extension, or grab hook.

We carry many colors like red, green, blue, and yellow so you can recognize what strap you are using, as well as matching your company or vehicle’s colors.

D-rings

A D-ring is a piece of hardware shaped like the letter D, that can connect to the strap or be mounted directly to your flatbed trailer to secure your cargo. D-rings and straps are a flexible way to supply a trailer with many tie-down points to secure the cargo load. We carry many different styles of d-rings, and we have d-ring parts and accessories that allow you to customize your trailer configuration.

We also carry transport chains and binders, rubber/bungee tarp straps, safety supplies, winch bars, and more. Learn more about the flatbed trailer equipment we carry on our USCC website.

Call our team of experts at 800-404-7068 if you have any questions or need more information.

Extracting a Stuck Vehicle

When extracting a stuck vehicle, many factors can affect the actual pulling force needed. Read on to learn what they are.

How to Calculate Minimum Winching Effort & Minimum Working Load Limit

extracting a stuck vehicle calculation formula

When extracting a stuck vehicle, many factors can affect the actual pulling force needed, as well as selecting recovery equipment with high enough load ratings.

During a recent Iowa Corn Growers Event hosted at US Cargo Control headquarters, Tim Sanders, a Trucking and Transporation expert, and USCC business development specialist, gave an informative overview of what goes into effectively extracting a vehicle that’s stuck in the mud, sand, gravel, snow, etc.

When work needs to get done, it may seem tempting to just grab a strap or chain and pull until something happens. However, if you take a few minutes to do some simple calculations, you’ll likely save time in the long run and more importantly, help ensure the safety of those around the extraction scene.

The formula for calculating the required minimum recovery capacity

Total vehicle weight (W), additional rolling resistance (ARR), and additional gradient resistance (AGR). Once you have these calculations, you can quickly determine the recovery equipment strength you will need:

  1. What does the stuck vehicle weight, including all cargo, attachments, trailers, etc.?

    This is the “W” part of the formula.
  2. What factors will add to the pulling effort and safe working load limits required to pull the total weight of the vehicle?

    When we say “additional factors” we’re mainly talking about two things: additional rolling resistance (ARR) and additional gradient resistance (AGR)

Minimum Capacity Required = W + ARR + AGR

tim sander USCC sales and trucking gear expert
USCC Business Development Specialist, Tim Sanders, shares how to determine the minimum recovery equipment capacity required for extracting a vehicle to a crowd of Iowa Corn Grower Members

Calculating additional rolling resistance

Additional rolling resistance (ARR) is essentially the surface in which the vehicle is stuck or will need to get over in order to become free. Different surface types have different multipliers that, when multiplied by the total vehicle weight, give you the “ARR.”

Keep in mind that these calculations assume the wheels are level with each other.

how to calculate additional rolling resistance by surface type
This chart shows the multipliers for different surface types. Multiply the total weight of the stuck vehicle by the appropriate multiplier to get total “ARR.”

Calculating gradient resistance

Gradient resistance (AGR) is simply the degree of slope that the extraction may take place on. The greater the slope, the higher the multiplier. Again, you will take the total weight of the stuck vehicle and multiply by the appropriate multiplier.

chart for calculating gradient resistance when extracting a stuck vehicle
This chart shows the multipliers for different degrees of slope. Multiply the total weight of the stuck vehicle by the appropriate multiplier to get total “AGR.”

Example Calculation

Let’s say the total weight of the stuck vehicle is 42,000 lbs., and it’s stuck in the snow with a 15-degree slope. Can you figure out the minimum capacity required? Remember the formula is:

Minimum Capacity Required = W + ARR + AGR

See below for the answer.

example calculation of minimum capacity required
Assuming all the factors on the left side of this chart, here is how to calculate the minimum capacity required for extracting a vehicle

Selecting the right recovery straps

Make sure the working load limit of the recovery equipment is greater than the minimum capacity required. Additional resistance could be encountered when the stuck vehicle is deeply submerged, or there is damage to the vehicle that prevents it from moving. When in doubt contact a vehicle recovery expert.

More Vehicle Recovery Resources

If you’re needing to pull an automobile out of snow that’s close to a public roadway, there are specific steps to take to ensure safety beyond just recovery capacity. Click the link above to learn what they are.

We also have resources that cover the common questions our team gets like how to choose a recovery strap and auto-recovery straps vs. tow straps.

If you have further questions on recovery straps and safe vehicle extraction, give Tim or anyone on our team a call at 800-969-6543.

NOTE: This article contains important safety information about the use of synthetic web slings. However, it does not contain all the information you need to know about handling, lifting, and manipulating materials and loads safely. Sling use is only one part of a lifting system and it is your responsibility to consider all risk factors prior to using any rigging device or product. Failure to do this may result in severe injury or death due to sling failure and/or loss of load

New Product Line Alert: Crosby® Chain Slings

The full line of Crosby® chain slings, including adjustable chain slings with the revolutionary Crosby Eliminator® system, is now available through USCC.

American-made 1-leg, 2-leg, 3-leg, and 4-leg chain slings now available through USCC in standard and adjustable styles.

crosby single leg chain sling
crosby 2-leg chain sling
crosby 3-leg chain slings
crosby 4-leg chain sling

The full line of Crosby® chain slings, including adjustable chain slings with the revolutionary Crosby Eliminator ® system, is now available from US Cargo Control. These premium rigging slings are 100% made in America using high-strength grade 100 chain. As an authorized Crosby® distributor, we’re proud to be one of a small number of distributors to offer these slings.

The Crosby® Difference

There’s a reason US Cargo Control offers a number of different Crosby® rigging and lifting products; they’re extremely innovative and built to last. From forging massive rigging shackles that are strong enough to lift the Statue of Liberty to non-marring lifting clamps that are gentle enough to lift sheets of glass, Crosby® has been a leading manufacturer of rigging and lifting equipment for well over a hundred years. Professionals worldwide look to them to set the standard for quality, training, and technical expertise in their field.

Because Crosby® handles all manufacturing in-house (including forging, assembly, and finishing), they are in complete control of their product and its quality. Check out the video below to learn more about how the Crosby® rigging hardware supply chain works compared to other supply chains with outsourced manufacturers.

source: Crosby®

What’s the Big Deal About the Crosby Eliminator®?

One of the most noticeable ways that the Crosby® line of chain slings stands out is in the new Crosby Eliminator® component found on Crosby® adjustable chain slings. This revolutionary chain sling fitting is designed to save riggers time and money by combining features and functionality of a master link, connecting link, grab hook, and adjuster legs.

crosby eliminator
Crosby® Eliminator with double hook

Like other adjustable chain slings, adjustment of the chain length leg can be accomplished by placing the chain in the connector link. Where the Crosby Eliminator® differs is in the fact that it comes in both single hook and double hook styles. With single and double-leg Crosby® adjustable slings, the top bail Eliminator® serves as the master link, which removes the need for an additional master link. Three and four-leg Crosby® slings need only one master link to connect the two Eliminator® fittings. This results in a simpler and lighter chain sling with strength and durability that rivals any competitor.

source: Crosby®

Crosby® Chain Sling Hook Options

There are several hook options for you to choose from. Give our sales team a call to understand all the options for custom chain slings.

Sling Hook

As the name suggests, sling hooks are commonly used at the ends of slings and wire rope. They have a large throat and are typically self-locking to avoid disconnect.

Foundry Hook

Foundry hooks have a wider opening than most other hooks which allow them to hold a wide range of attachments and help prevent load tipping.

Self-Locking Hook

Self-locking hooks are designed with safety in mind as their latches automatically close and lock under the weight of the load.

Grab Hook

Grab hooks are commonly used as shortening hooks in choke applications. They have a much more narrow opening which makes them ideal for attaching to chain.

hook options for crosby chain slings
From left to right: sling hook, foundry hook, self-locking hook, grab hook

Unsure which type of lifting sling you need? Check out our post on How to Choose a Lifting Sling and learn more about the difference between standard and adjustable chain slings.

When you’re ready to start lifting with these high-quality Crosby® chain slings, head over to the USCC website or give our sales team a call at 800-404-7068.

CVSA Roadcheck 2019 is Right Around the Corner

If you haven’t already, here’s how to prepare yourself and your commercial vehicle for a North American Standard Level I Inspection.

Steering and suspension systems will be top of mind for inspectors

If you haven’t already, now is the time to prepare yourself and your commercial vehicle for a North American Standard Level I Inspection.

From Tuesday, June 4th through Thursday, June 6th the 2019 Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s (CVSA) International Roadcheck will take place throughout North America. Over that 72-hour period, CVSA inspectors will be out in droves to verify your operating requirements and examine your vehicle’s mechanical fitness.

CVSA inspection officer directing traffic to side of road

Why focus on steering and suspension?

Just like how the 2018 International Roadcheck focused on hours-of-service compliance, this year’s emphasis will be on checking steering components and suspension systems which are vital to maintaining a safe roadway.

In a recent American Trucker magazine article, CVSA president and Arkansas Highway Police Chief, Jay Thompson, stated “Not only do they [steering and suspension] support heavy loads carried by trucks and buses, but they also help maintain stability and control under acceleration and braking, keeping the vehicle safely on the road. Furthermore, they keep tires in alignment, reducing chances of uneven tire wear and possible tire failure, and they maximize the contact between the tires and the road to provide steering stability and good handling.”

But steering and suspension checks are just one aspect of the 37-step procedure you can expect from inspectors during the 2019 Roadcheck.

truck driver operating requirements for 2019 roadcheck

Driver operating requirements for 2019 CVSA Roadcheck

Here’s what you as a commercial driver need to ensure you have ready when it comes to the 2019 CVSA Roadcheck:

  • Driver’s license (showing operating credentials)
  • Medical Examiner’s Certificate and Skill Performance Evaluation Certificate (if applicable)
  • Your record of duty status and vehicle inspection reports (if applicable)

Inspectors will also be checking you for:

  • Seat belt usage
  • Sickness or fatigue
  • Apparent alcohol or drug impairment
cargo securement on flatbed truck for 2019 CVSA roadcheck

Vehicle inspection checklist for 2019 CVSA Roadcheck

Other than the obvious check on the state of your steering and suspension systems, inspectors will be examining the following parts of your rig:

  • Brake systems
  • Cargo securement
  • Coupling device
  • Driveline/driveshaft
  • Driver’s seat
  • Exhaust system
  • Frame
  • Fuel System
  • Lighting Devices (headlights, taillights, stop lights, turn signals, and lights/flags for oversize loads)
  • Steering mechanism
  • Tires
  • Van and flatbed trailer bodies
  • Wheels, rims, and hubs
  • Windshield wipers

CVSA stickers

If there are no critical violations found, you’ll get a CVSA decal that shows you successfully passed the 2019 Roadcheck (for whichever inspection level was performed). This sticker will keep you from having to go through that same level inspection during the June 4th to June 6th, 2019 time period.

Stay safe out there!

Inside NATE’s Advanced Rigging Principles Training Hosted at USCC

In all, about 55 industry professionals attended the day-long event.

(and where to find free upcoming training sessions)

A few weeks ago, a large section of the USCC headquarters in Urbana, Iowa transformed from cafeteria to classroom in order to hold an important rigging principles training event for professionals in the communication tower industry.

In all, about 55 members of the industry attended the day-long event, all with the goal of advancing their knowledge of key rigging principles including using synthetic rope, rope inspection, rigging forces and lift systems, plus communication and execution of hoisting operations per the ANSE/ASSE 10.48 Standard.

rigging principles attendees at US Cargo Control headquarters
Attendees of the Advanced Rigging Principles training got together for a picture at the end

How it Happened

The free training was provided by The National Association of Tower Erectors (NATE), a non-profit organization that USCC is proud to be an active member of. They’re experts in the wireless and broadcast infrastructure industries and are always looking for ways to spread information and education. In the past, we’ve shared info about the NATE UNITE conference and trade show in Nashville, which some of our rigging product sales specialists attend annually and always learn a lot from.

A NATE representative was recently visiting USCC headquarters and after seeing our facility, suggested to the NATE office that they use our space. There were 12 locations picked all across the country, with the next closest ones taking place in St. Louis and Milwaukee.

Sections of the Advanced Rigging Principles Training

The Advanced Rigging Principles curriculum is organized into six sections:

• Section 1: Introduction to NATE and OSHA
• Section 2: State of the Industry
• Section 3: Primary Regulations, Codes, Standards, and Policies
• Section 4: Synthetic Rope
• Section 5: Rigging Forces and Lift Systems
• Section 6: Communication and Execution of Hoisting Operations

advanced fundamentals of rigging principles class hosted at USCC
During a break in the training, attendees chatted and ate lunch catered by USCC

Interested in Attending?

There are still a handful of opportunities to attend this free class at other locations across the United States. See the chart below for dates, locations, and how to register now.

Thursday, June 13, 20199:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. CDT
Hilton New Orleans Airport
901 Airline Drive
Kenner, Louisiana 70062
Register Now
Monday, July 15, 20199:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. PDT
Hyatt House Seattle/Bellevue
3244 139th Ave SE
Bellevue, Washington 98005
Register Now
Thursday, August 8, 20199:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. CDT
Hyatt Regency St. Louis at the Arch
315 Chestnut St
St Louis, Missouri 63102
Register Now
Friday, August 23, 20199:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. CDT
ENSA Access & Rescue 
727 East Veterans Way
Mukwonago, Wisconsin 53149
Register Now
Monday, September 16, 20199:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. EDT
Sheraton Needham Hotel
100 Cabot Street
Needham, Massachusetts 02494
Register Now

Class not for you, but still need rigging gear? USCC has you covered. Browse our selection of lifting and rigging gear today, and reach out to one of our sales specialists if you have any questions.

The Most Important Part of US Cargo Control Isn’t a Product

How trade show season helps us help you better

How trade show season helps us help you better

Although the weather in many places doesn’t tell us so, trade show season is upon us. If you haven’t already, many of you will soon find yourself at an industry trade show, safety meeting, or annual meeting in the coming months. And because USCC serves the trucking & transportation, rigging & lifting, and moving industries, many members of our team have been on the road, in booths, and at industry events across the country.

Professional truck drivers enjoy the Iowa 80 Jamboree at The World’s Largest Truck Stop.

No matter what industry you’re a part of, trade shows are a way to discover businesses and resources in your industry and learn about the products or services they offer. It’s a chance to compare similar resources apples-to-apples and decide which provides the best value for your individual needs. And while part of this is likely product selection, price, freight time, and other logistical calculations don’t make the mistake of overlooking the most important and valuable aspect of trade shows and of good business—the people.

It’s About the People

In an age where just about every business has a website address, list of social media accounts, and handful of other digital tools to communicate and serve their customers with, it’s easy to get sucked into the screen and miss the big picture.

Don’t get me wrong, websites that make online ordering easy are a great thing. In general, technology gives us all a way to get information quickly, weight our options, and get jobs done more efficiently. Just don’t allow it to make you lose sight of the reason for the work that you do.

Volunteers use wire rope clips from USCC to construct a 100+ foot suspended footbridge over the Hockanum River in Vernon, Connecticut.

At the end of the day, the most important part of our business, and your business, is people. It’s about making people’s lives safer, easier, and more productive. We give people the tools to start their own business, continually grow one that’s been around for decades, or simply get a job done right.

Whether it’s hauling the White House Christmas tree across the country so thousands can enjoy its beauty or delivering fuel to a gas pump so people can drive to work. Constructing a high-rise apartment building so hundreds of people have a home, or building a suspended footbridge so a few people can escape to nature. Moving a family of six across the country for new opportunity, or moving your neighbor’s couch down some stairs to enjoy just for the big game. Your job, no matter what it entails on the surface, is about helping people.

Our job is about making it safe and easy for you to help. Because, when we do that, everyone benefits.

What’s important to you?

Trade shows allow us to catch up face-to-face with the people we regularly talk to over the phone or through email. They allow us to meet customers old and new, shake their hand, look them in their eyes, and listen to their individual wants and needs. Some have questions on shipping rates, some love our custom products, and others want us to explain differences between similar products. No computer could understand those individual needs as clearly as a human conversation can.

White Glove Movers rolling a heavy tool chest into their moving truck.

It’s easy to overlook real human connection in this digital age, but its importance will never change no matter what industry you’re in.

It’s why our founder, Tim, started and sticks by his promise of getting you “What you want, when you need it.” We understand the importance of building relationships with the people who keep these important industries moving forward. Every business and every person is unique. Without taking the time to truly understand your unique situation, we would be selling ourselves short.

It’s more than just doing business, it’s helping people be more and achieve more. It’s working with you individually to ensure your needs are met and your business can be successful. If we do that, you’re able to pass the same level of dedication on to your customers and the people you help every day by doing your job well.

USCC made in america
Production Manager, Jamie Farmer, gives direction to fellow USCC employees.

Tradeshows in March

Throughout March, our USCC team will be busy meeting people like you to better understand what they want and when they need it. We hope to see you and learn from you at one of these upcoming events.

Machinery Haulers Association Annual Meeting
March 8th – 9th | Las Vegas, NV

Minnesota Trucking Association Safety Meeting
March 19 | St. Paul, MN

American Moving & Storage Association Conference
March 24th – 26th | Houston, TX

2 Important Association Events Happening this February

They say everything is bigger in Texas, and two upcoming industry events are positioned to prove just that. Gear up with USCC as we visit NATE UNITE & SC&RA Symposium 2019

Information on NATE UNITE and SC&RA Symposium 2019 (plus how to get live updates)

They say everything is bigger in Texas, and two upcoming industry events are positioned to prove just that.

Gear up with USCC team members Lacy, Josh, and Alex as they visit the Lone Star State for the already in progress NATE UNITE Conference and Tim, Adam, Alex, and Ben as they get ready for the upcoming Specialized Transportation Symposium in Houston.

NATE UNITE 2019: February 4th – 7th

NATE UNITE 2019 details and information

NATE UNITE is one of the biggest and best conferences/trade shows in the wireless and broadcast infrastructure industries. On top of the massive exhibit hall with over a hundred exhibitors, there will networking opportunities, educational sessions, and speakers.

Anyone that’s a fan of the show Duck Commander will be excited to know that the keynote speaker is none other than Willie Robertson. Willie will be talking about his passion for the outdoors and his experiences in leading and growing his various companies.

Other notable topics covered in some of the 21 different educational sessions include:

Determining Rigging Forces

State of Wireless Industry from the Wall Street View

Dropped Loads – A Serious Epidemic

Challenges Faced by Industry Veterans

Women: Powering the Tower Industry

What to Expect When OSHA Shows Up

Check out the event links below for a complete list of sessions and more details on NATE UNITE 2019.

Keep up with USCC

 NATE UNITE 2019 team
Lacy, Alex, & Josh

Our rigging and lifting equipment experts will be at booth 727. Stop by, say hi, and enter to win Omaha Steaks, a Home Depot Gift Card, or an Amazon Fire Tablet!

Follow USCC on Facebook to keep up with our giveaway and to get our inside look at NATE UNITE 2019.

Helpful Event Links

Pre Show Planner

Schedule

Exhibit Hall Map

Specialized Transporation Symposium 2019:

February 19th – 22nd

2019 Specialized Transportation Symposium details and information

The 2019 Specialized Transportation Symposium will bring together top managers in operations, safety directors, pilot car professionals, permitting officials, law enforcement, and many others who deal with the professional transportation of oversize/overweight cargo.

The main goal is to ensure that permitting runs smoothly, safety concerns are addressed, and the most pressing topics in specialized transportation are discussed. The SC&RA is also planning on unveiling its groundbreaking proposal for 100 percent uniform permit weight analysis and allowance.

In addition to an exhibit center with a record-high 60 booths, there will be education sessions and expert speakers from within the industry.

Former Navy SEAL and Co-Star of American Sniper, Kevin “Dauber” Lacz will kick off the 2019 symposium by speaking on “the pitfalls of becoming too comfortable in any situation and the characteristics of the most successful individuals.”

Keep up with USCC

Our very own, Adam Shouse, was just selected to serve on the SC&RA Symposium Leadership Forum, an honor that just 15 people in the world were given. The SC&RA selects the most outstanding up-and-coming leaders in the Transportation and Rigging Industries to serve on this forum.

Ben Rechkemmer

Adam, Tim, Ben, and Alex will all be at the US Cargo Control exhibit booth in Houston. Stop by and say hello!

Follow USCC on Facebook to keep up with our booth giveaway and to get our inside look at the Specialized Transportation Symposium.

Helpful Event Links

Why You Should Attend (and how to convince your boss)

Schedule

Exhibit Hall Map

Official Event App

Don’t forget to stay connected with USCC on social media. We have many more exciting association events and trade shows coming in 2019. Stay tuned!

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USCC linkedin
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