How to Use an Endless Ratchet Strap

image of endless ratchet strapAn endless ratchet strap is designed to bundle or band items together, so it’s great for use on a pallet, moving dolly, etc.  Sometimes called “endless loop ratchet straps” or just an “endless strap,” they’re available in a variety of widths, lengths, and colors.

Because a ratchet can be tensioned tightly, it’s a good idea to add corner protectors if you’re strapping together loads that may have delicate or crushable edges. Another option to consider for more fragile loads is an endless cam buckle strap since a cam buckle cannot be over-tightened the same way a ratchet strap can.

1.) Feed the strap through the bottom of the pallet, keeping the strap going the same direction as the fork truck tines. This will prevent the strap from being damaged by the tines.

2.) Bring the loose end of the strap over the top of the pallet and feed the webbing onto the mandrel take up spool of the ratchet. Pull the extra webbing through so that the slack is out of the strap. Failure to perform this step will result in too much webbing being spooled onto the take-up spool and will cause it to jam before the strap is fully tightened. In severe cases you will damage the ratchet assembly and/or you will have to cut the webbing off.

3.) Place corner protectors as needed over the edges of the cargo. This is especially useful if you have cardboard boxes or fragile cargo that will cave in or break when the strap is tightened. Corner protectors are also good for protecting the strap from abrasive cargo such as bricks to increase their life expectancy.

4.) Once you’ve removed the extra slack from the strap, you can begin to ratchet it down to your desired tension.

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8 Legends In Our Placard Set: What Do They Mean?

Image of truck placard set from US Cargo ControlOur placard set is one of our best-selling items in our vehicle and driver supplies, due in part to its versatility- eight different legends are available with the quick switch of the plates. The hazardous materials placard’s legends cover a wide variety of labels for whatever hazardous materials you find yourself hauling.  These meet the all-important requirements from 49 CFR Part 172.519 of all hazmat codes.  So one question really makes sense: what are the eight legends in the placard set and what does it take to use each?

Dangerous

The “Dangerous” placard needs to be used if the shipment in question has non-bulk packages of two or more of these other placards, meaning multiple signs are required.  This could be if a chemical was flammable and explosive, for example, or chemical and combustible, etc.

Corrosive (Class 8)

To be considered corrosive, the material can be solid or liquid, but its main trait is that if a person comes into contact with it, the “full destruction” of human skin will occur within a certain amount of time after contact.  Also any liquid that can corrode steel or aluminum is also considered corrosive in nature.

Flammable Liquid (Class 3)

A liquid is considered Class 3 flammable when it has a flash point of not more than 60.5°C (141°F), or also for any liquid that has a flash point above 37.8°C (100°F) that is intentionally heated, and is transported at or above flash point in bulk packaging.

Flammable Gas (Class 2)Image of truck placard from US Cargo Control

The Class 2 flammable gas legend is for any gas that is compressed and stored for transportation, and is also flammable when put into contact with an open flame.

Non-Flammable Gas (Class 2)

To use the non-flammable gas legend you’re looking at any gas that is compressed for transportation but is not naturally flammable, according to the HAZMAT Class 2 gas requirements in the United States.

Inhalation Hazard (Class 6)

This designation is for any poisonous material other than a gas that is known to be toxic and possibly fatal to humans.  Toxic gas gets a designation of poisonous gas, so is separate from this one.

Oxidizer (Class 5.1)

You can use the oxidizer legend when hauling any chemical that readily yields oxygen in reactions, which is a fancy way of saying it can cause combustion or enhance any combustion taking place.

Image of semi truck placard from US Cargo ControlPoison (Class 6)

Any material being hauled that is known to be toxic to people and presents a health hazard during transportation (other than gas) is classified as a poison.

You can find more information online at the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) page: Hazmat regulations.