What is Wire Rope, and How is it Different from Cable Rope?

Read what is wire rope, what are important specifications to look for, and how it’s different from cable rope.

Did you know wire ropes were used as far back as the 1830s for mining hoist applications? Nowadays, we can use steel ropes for many different applications such as lifting and hoisting in elevators and cranes, and for mechanical power transmission. US Cargo Control’s wire rope slings are an excellent choice for heavy-duty jobs as their fabrication offers excellent abrasion resistance and heat resistance for extreme conditions.

Although these slings are beneficial for the lifting and rigging industry, there are a few specifications to know before purchasing them. Continue reading what is wire rope, what are important specifications to look for, and how it’s different from cable rope.

What is Wire Rope?

Up close shot of wire rope sling on shackle
Photo Courtesy: Adobe Stock

These slings carry different properties that can determine their performance. Wire rope is constructed where a strand consists of two or more wires arranged and twisted in a specific arrangement. The individual strands are then laid in a helical pattern around the core of the rope. Once the wires are formed, they all come together to create greater strength and flexibility.

These slings work well for lifting, hoisting, towing, or anchoring loads. They’re manufactured in a variety of configurations, with 6×19 and 6×36 being the most common. When you see 6×19 or 6×36 from our website, these numbers represent the number of wires making up the strand and the number of strands wrapped around the core.

For example, a 6×19 indicates that there are 19 wires making up a strand, and 6 strands wrapping around the core. To learn more about our 6×19 wire ropes, look into our bestselling 1/2″ Galvanized Wire Rope EIPS IWRC, 1/2″ Stainless Steel Wire Rope IWRC T304, and 1/2″ Bright Wire Rope EIPS FC.

The configurations will offer different benefits for certain applications. In general, a smaller number of large outer wires offers better wear and corrosion resistance, while a larger number of small wires provides a better level of flexibility and fatigue resistance. Continue reading to learn which wire rope fits your job.

Terms that Define Construction and Properties of Wire Rope

Before immediately purchasing a wire sling, there are 7 properties that you should know about:

  1. Different Types of Wire Rope Slings
  2. Length
  3. Size
  4. Direction and Type of Lay
  5. Finish of Wires
  6. Grade of Rop
  7. Type of Core

1. Different Types of Wire Rope Slings

There are different versions of wire rope slings, ranging from single leg to 4 legs, as well as braided wire rope and domestic wire rope slings (manufactured in the U.S. with Crosby® hardware). When looking at the types of slings we offer at US Cargo Control, be sure to consider how much versatility and capability you need.

For example, a braided wire rope has increased flexibility and friction to grip loads over a regular wire rope. Adding an additional leg to the sling can add additional versatility and strength.

2. Length

the length of the wire rope sling

This is the total number of feet that are cut to size when wrapped around.

3. Size

the size and strand pattern of a wire rope

This is the measurement of the rope’s diameter and can be displayed in inches or millimeters. These sizes commonly display different strand patterns where the number of layers, wires per layer, and size of the wires per layer all affect the strand pattern. Wire rope can be constructed using one of the following patterns below or using two or more patterns.

  • Single Layer – a common example is a 7 wire strand. This has a single-wire center with six wires of the same diameter around it.
  • Filler Wire – this has two layers of uniform-size wire around a center with the inner layer having half the number of wires as the outer layer.
  • Seale – has two layers of wires around a center with the same number of wires in each layer. All wires in each layer are the same diameter.
  • Warrington – this construction has two layers of wires around a center with one diamter of wire in the inner layer, and two diameteres of wire alternating large and small in the outer layer.
  • Combination – when a strand is formed in a single operation using two or more of the above constructions, it’s referred as a “combined pattern.”

4. Direction and Type of Lay

The type of lay refers to the way the wires are laid to form a strand. They’re how the strands are laid around the core which can be regular lay, long lay, or alternate lay.

Regular Lay

The wires line up with the axis of the rope. This is where the wires are twisting in one direction, and the strands in the opposite direction create the rope. Regular lay is less likely to untwist and less likely to crush.

LAng Lay

This is the opposite of regular lay where the wires form an angle with the axis of the rope. The wires and strands spiral in the same direction and run at a diagonal to the centerline of the rope. Lang lay is more flexible and resistant to abrasion than regular lay wire ropes. The only con is this type of lay will be more likely to twist and crush than the regular lay.

Alternate Lay

Sometimes known as reverse lay, this type of lay consists of alternating regular lay and long lay strands. This unites the best features of both types, and it’s using relatively large outer wires to provide an increase of abrasion resistance.

5. Finish of Wires

steel wire rope sling in heavy industrial
Photo Courtesy: Adobe Stock

This refers to the protective coating that’s applied to the wire rope. There are three types of finishes which are galvanized (zinc-coated), stainless steel, and bright (unfinished steel).

Note that the galvanized material will provide extra corrosion resistance, and stainless steel is highly resistant to corrosion.

6. Grade of Rope

The grade of the rope means the grade of steel being used. The plow steel strength calculates the strengths of most steel wire ropes. Some classifications include Improved Plow Steel (IPS), Extra Improved Plow Steel (EIPS), Extra Extra Improved Plow Steel (EEIPS), Galvanized Improved Plowed Steel (GIPS), and Drawn Galvanized Imrpoved Plow Steel (DGEIP).

EIPS is 15% stronger than IPS, and EEIPS is 10% stronger than EIPS. Along with that, GIPS and DGEIP wires can add corrosion resistance to your application, but DGEIP wires have a higher break load than GIPS.

7. Type of Core

The type of core is what makes up the center of the wire rope. There are three types of core: Fiber Core (FC), Independent Wire Rope Core (IWRC), and Wire Strand Core (WSC).

A fiber core can be made of synthetic polypropylene fibers. The fiber cores offer greater elasticity than a steel core, but are more susceptible to crushing. This isn’t recommended for high heat environments.

A steel core can either be an independent wire rope or individual strand. The steel cores can provide adequate support, or in an operating environment where temperatures can exceed very high heat.

What’s the Difference between Wire Rope and Cable Rope?

A wire rope sling being used to lift a heavy load
Photo Courtesy: Adobe Stock

Wire and cable ropes are terms that are often interchangeable but do have one varying difference. Wire rope refers to the diameters that are larger than 3/8 inch. Sizes smaller than this are classified as cable rope or even cords. Regardless of the size difference, cable and wire rope are still classified as a “machine.” Even a group of strands laid around a core would still be called a cable or wire rope.

Tackle the Toughest Lifting Jobs with High-Quality Rigging Hardware

We know the importance of quality when it comes to lifting supplies. We carry a variety of rigging hardware, as well as lifting beams and spreader bars that are designed to lift heavy loads safely and efficiently. If you’re interested in other lifting slings, check the other types of slings we carry like nylon slings and chain slings.

Need a custom lifting sling? We can do that. We’ll work with you and customize a lifting sling to meet your specific needs.

Read more information about wire rope slings below!

How to Safely Apply Wire Rope Clips to Wire Rope Assemblies

How to Use Wire Rope Clips

What is Sling Protection, What are the Different Types of Slings, & How to Protect Them

Contact our sales team at US Cargo Control today at 866-444-9990. Our team of product experts is here to answer any questions about rigging hardware, lifting slings, and more.

What is Sling Protection, What are the Different Types of Slings, & How to Protect Them

Sling protection products can protect slings, the load, and even the load’s surroundings. Read to learn how to improve the durability of your slings and create safety and cost saving solutions in the workplace.

Are you constantly having to buy new lifting slings, or finding that your slings keep getting damaged? Are you noticing that improper use of the load or load damage is often caused by the sling itself? These issues are related to one of the most common lifting problems – lack of proper sling protection.

Luckily, we have a few tips on how to improve the endurance and longevity of your slings. In this blog, we’ll explain what is sling protection, when slings require protection, and the best sling protection products.

What is Sling Protection?

Use Corner Guards to Protect Lifting Slings

Sling protection is a common term in the lifting and rigging industry. Just like adding a screen protector to your phone, there are sling protection products that can protect your slings from sharp corners and edges.

We need to ensure the lifting sling is not cut or abraded during the lift, and the load is secured. We’re able to achieve that through products that support the durability of the lifting slings.

When researching sling protection products, it’s important to understand that some products are good for preventing abrasions while others are good for resistance to cutting. It’s also critical to know that the most common sling protection materials are polyester or nylon webbing, Kevlar, rubber, leather, and wood. While learning about your slings or the slings you wish to get, make sure to know what application you are using the sling for as well as the physical properties of the load and sling protection products.

We’re emphasizing the importance of sling protection producs because it’s typically less expensive to replace sling protection products multiple times than to replace the lifting sling.

When do Slings Require Protection?

Rigging wire rope and shackle

All types of lifting slings like nylon, polyester, wire rope, and chain must be protected from edges, corners, and protrusions. You can use products like corner guards, sleeves, reinforced eyes, and wear pads to help your slings. We also carry a line of Straightpoint Load Monitoring Loadcells to precisely measure and safely monitor the tension of loads involving wire rope, guy wire, synthetic rope, shackles, and more.

While all types of lifting slings require protection from sharp corners and edges, it’s common to use sling protection products to a synthetic sling like round slings and web slings. This is because the nylon and polyester fibers of a synthetic sling are more susceptible to cuts, tears, and abrasion than stronger sling materials like wire rope or chain. In fact, the cutting of synthetic slings during use is the number one cause of sling accidents.

The sling can make contact with the load or hardware:

  • Around any lift points like load edges, hoist rings, and eye bolts
  • Around the crane hook, shackle, and master link.
  • On load edges that could be above the hookup points

What Happens When I Don’t Protect My Slings?

How to Protect your lifting slings from sharp edges

There are several ways slings could be destroyed if you don’t use sling protection products. Without the usage of sling protection products, there is potential for:

  • Injury or loss of life
  • Higher turnover of slings, especially synthetic ones
  • Major damage to the sling, load, and around the load’s surroundings if the sling is cut, and the load is dropped
  • Damage caused to the load itself from lack of protection, especially when using wire rope and chain slings which can exert crushing forces on a load

As explained above, when you’re not using the proper sling protection, it can result in a dropped load or scratching and damaging it. This can be dangerous as this could result in injury, dismemberment, or loss of life.

In addition to that, if you’re not protecting your slings, you’re creating a higher turnover in slings and this will result in higher equipment costs. To learn more about what lifting slings you should use for the right job, read 3 Factors to Consider When Choosing Lifting Slings.

How Do Sharp Edges or Corners Damage Slings?

What is sling protection, how to protect any lifting sling

Edges can damage different types of slings in several different ways.

If you’re using chain slings, the edges can cause nicks and gouges, crushed links, and bent or twisted links. When using wire rope, the corners could damage broken wires, kinks, or doglegs. Lastly, nylon and polyester slings can be cut or abraded easily.

If your sling isn’t protected and it gets damaged, it’s more expensive to replace the sling than the sling protection product. It is much more cost-effective to replace the sling protection rather than replacing the sling itself.

Nylon and polyester slings can be easily confusing as they have a few similarities. To understand which web sling you should get, read Polyester Slings vs Nylon Slings: Which Web Sling Type is Better?

Tackle the Toughest Lifting Jobs with High-Quality Rigging Hardware

We know the importance of quality when it comes to lifting supplies. We carry a variety of rigging hardware, as well as lifting beams and spreader bars that are designed to lift heavy loads safely and efficiently. 

Need a custom lifting sling? We can do that. We’ll customize a lifting sling to meet your specific needs.

Curious about Straightpoint products and how they work? Read more information about them below!

Do You Know How Much That Weighs? Straightpoint Load Cells Do

Compression Type Load Cells: Wireless vs. Wired

How to Select a Load Cell

Contact our sales team at US Cargo Control today at 866-444-9990. Our team of product experts is here to answer any questions about rigging hardware, lifting slings, and more.

Key Factors to Having a Test Bed, and What This Means for You

Learn what this machine means for our business and for you for the long run.

US Cargo Control just got a brand new toy in the house, and it’s a horizontal test bed! For the past few months, we’ve been experimenting with this equipment that will help us run more efficiently and grow as a company, create time and cost-saving solutions, and provide customers what they want, when they need it.

What is the Purpose Behind the Test Bed?

Also known as a proof test machine, the test bed has several different purposes that meet all of our needs. It can help us add new and potential capabilities, ensure our current product verifications are being met, and give us confidence we’re giving customers products that have been successfully tested for quality and accuracy.

The most important reason we have our own test bed in-house is it’ll make sure that the products we’re supplying meet the needed Working Load Limits (WLL) and Break Strengths (BS). If you’d like to learn more about the WLL and BS, read what the numbers on your load-bearing equipment mean.

This machine serves our mission to get the customer the quality products that they deserve. We sat down with one of our experts, Wendi Kafer, to learn the key factors to having this machine.

What is the Test Bed?

US Cargo Control using Chant Engineering's test bed for cargo products

It is a horizontal test bed from Chant Engineering which has the capacity to conduct tension or proof test up to 150K LB on our lifting slings and tiedown straps. The products are placed in the testbed and pulled to their WLL or beyond, depending on what pull test you are wanting to conduct.

Although its intended use is for the lifting industry, we can also test load-bearing equipment for the trucking and moving industries.

Why Did US Cargo Control Get a Test Bed?

We initially purchased the test bed to determine the design and verification of our current products and new capabilities. Not only that, it creates better time and cost-saving solutions, which is a win in our books.

If we test our nylon and recovery straps through our 3rd party lab, the costs would have been around $68,000. Because we have our own testing equipment, we can create our own products in-house and this avoids creating continous huge costs.

What Results Have We Seen?

Using the test bed for a nylon lifting sling

The test bed has given us the ability to test and determine the design and verification for most of our recovery and nylon straps to achieve the results we seek. Along with that, we’ll be able to make new and current capabilities in-house instead of drop shipping them!

We also conducted testing on our tiedowns to confirm their tack strengths. For example, we changed the tack pattern on our 3″ and 4″ tiedowns to significantly reduce the time it takes to produce an assembly. We tested the new tack pattern (according to the WSTDA standards) on our test bed, and we saved 30 seconds per fixed ends and loose ends while still maintaining their strength ratings!

Lastly, we’ve been able to confirm the Working Load Limit and Break Strength on our custom tiedown straps. As we continue to test our tiedowns with hardware like shackles and chains, we will also work to find the safest and most cost-efficient way to test our full assemblies.

What Does the Test Bed Mean for Our Customers?

Currently, this machine will give us the opportunity to conduct proof load testing that a customer may request on a lifting sling. A proof load test is a type of test that proves the fitness and working load limit of the lifting equipment that it’s designed to withstand. This will ensure the lifting equipment works correctly and safely through its operational cycle.

What Products Are We Using Currently with the Test Bed?

US Cargo Control creating tiedown straps in house

We are currently test recovery straps, lifting slings, tiedowns with loops, and potentially some tiedowns with hardware.

Tiedowns with hardware require special hookups to the pins of the machine in order to be pulled. We have the possibility to use shackles, round slings, chains, and more that we have in-house. The straps with hardware will need to be reviewed and be determined if we can currently test at this time.

What’s the Process of Testing the Products on the Machine?

using the test bed to test break strength and working load limit on a strap

The most critical and first step we take is safety. We alert everyone in the area that we will be testing the products and ear protection is available. We place the product in the test bed before closing it, and plug in information in the machine’s computer such as the type of test being conducted and the desired Break Strength we would like the product to be pulled to.

After the setup is complete, we will start testing. We can determine if the product fails or passes the test when it reaches the WLL and BS. If it fails, we examine why it has failed and collect the data so we can improve our products for the next test.

We upload the test into our database to file and record on our master testing sheet. We use this data to make improvements if the product fails and if a customer would like the information of the product that passed the testing for their records.

Getting You What You Want, When You Need It

Having the test bed in-house creates excitement at US Cargo Control because we’ll be able to confirm verifications ourselves before sending any new products to our website or shipping them to our customers. We enjoy finding new opportunities to continue growing our business, and with our new machine, we’ll be able to identify new possibilities so we can continue to be your source for equipment for hauling, rigging, moving, towing, and lifting all kinds of cargo.

We’re all ecstatic about this brand new machine and can’t wait to get your orders out of the door and into your hands!

Our team looks forward to getting you the quality products you deserve. If you wish to learn more about our products, head over to US Cargo Control or give our team a call at 866-444-9990.

How to Select a Load Cell

Ask these 4 simple questions to pinpoint the exact load cell you need

You don’t have to be an expert in load cell technology to select the one you need and feel confident that it will get the job done right.

The technology found in many modern load cells can seem overwhelming at first, but in industries where precision is a must, choosing and properly using an appropriate load cell could mean the difference between another successful day at work and an expensive or potentially dangerous miscalculation.

Luckily, we’re in 2021. Once you select the load cell that’s right for your application, you can enjoy enhanced safety, accuracy, and efficiency through the use of simple software and load cell readouts that fit in the palm of your hand, function from nearly a mile away, and provide +/- 0.1% accuracy.

Despite the many brands and types of load cells available on the market today, choosing the exact right one for your needs is fairly simple when you break it all down. Let’s walk through the 4 simple questions that will guide you in selecting the right load cell.

selecting load cells
Tension load cells from Straightpoint can handle tension reading capacities ranging from 1-ton up to 500-tons.

1. What is your application environment?

First, it’s important to consider the general environment in which you’ll be using the load cell. In terms of durability, there’s a wide spectrum ranging from low-capacity, unsealed load cells to weatherproof multi-ton options.

If you’re needing load cells for industrial applications involving cranes or heavy loads, you’ll want to select a trusted load cell brand that’s been rigorously tested and proven to have high manufacturing standards. If the load cell could be exposed to water you’ll want one rated for common environmental protections like IP67 or NEMA6.

2. What are you needing to measure?

Next, what is the specific goal you’re trying to accomplish with a load cell? Tug testing? Structural weighing? Laying cable, or maybe something else? “Load cell” is a broad term that encompasses many different electronic measurement tools including tensiometers, dynamometers, load shackles, and even common crane scales. Of course, you’ll want to get a load cell that’s designed to safely measure whatever it is you’re working with. Still, keep in mind that there is some crossover in what these load cell types can do. Below is a list of common load cell types found in the rigging and lifting industry, plus their common application.

Compression Load Cells – structural weighing and the confirmation of mass or center of gravity


Tension Load Cells – measures tension levels, commonly used for overhead weighing and heavy lift applications


Crane Scales – weighs pretty much anything that can be fasted to its hanging hook, crane optional


Shackle Load Cells – common in industrial crane applications, especially limited headroom or super heavy lift projects

Towcells – monitors tensile towing forces, engineered for emergency/rescue services, salvage, 4X4 events, and other vehicle load monitoring applications


Running Line Dynamometers – measures tension, line speed, and distance for wire rope, electrical cables, and synthetic rope


Clamp On Line Tensiometers – measuring guy wire and wire rope tension

wire rope tension load cell from straightpoint
The Straightpoint COLT clamp on line tensionmeter is a fast and accurate tool for measuring guy wire and wire rope tension up to 11,000 pounds with up to 1-inch diameters.

3. How do you want to transmit and check load cell readouts?

If you have a smartphone in your pocket, you know just how far wireless technology has come over the past few years. Load cells are no exception. In fact, many modern load cells such as industry-leading Straightpoint load monitoring load cells, are compatible with your cell phone or smart device via Bluetooth or by simply downloading a free load cell monitoring app. These advanced wireless load cells work from long distances for increased safety and can also sync with a larger computer or a special wireless handheld reader to remotely read and adjust load cell setups. Of course, wired load cell options still exist, but it’s important to understand there are many more options in the field these days that could bring you added benefits.

4. What weight capacity and dimension requirements do you have?

Finally, once you know the level of durability you need, the type of load cell that measures your workload, and whether you want wired or wireless transmission, you’re almost finished. The final step in how to select a load cell is to ensure you get one that can handle your application’s weight capacity and physical dimensions. Whether it’s in pounds, kilograms, tons, inches, or centimeters – check the spec sheets carefully to ensure the load capacity and physical dimensions of the load cell itself align with your application. You shouldn’t have any doubt in your mind that what you order can handle your load safely and effectively.

Summary

Whether you have old load monitoring load cells that need to be replaced or are investing in these intelligent tools for the first time, selecting the proper load cell is important. Professionals in many different industries rely on these tools to provide precise measurements that could otherwise mean costly mistakes. First, decide on the level of durability you want. Then, consider what you’re needing to measure and the way you’d like to transmit those measurements. Finally, narrow in on the load cell specs to find one that’s able to comfortably handle your application.

Still have questions? Give our rigging and lifting product experts a call at 800-404-7068.

Compression Type Load Cells: Wireless vs. Wired

How to choose the best compression load cell for your application

Compression type load cells (commonly referred to as canister load cells or load cell pancakes) are necessary tools for compression force testing, structural weighing, and the confirmation of mass and center of gravity.

Essentially, a compression load cell is a block that’s designed to sit under a load at a single point in order to measure compression. While tension load cells measure the pulling force, compression load cells are more low-profile load cells that measure pushing force along a single axis.

compression type load cells being used

Compression type load cells are used in many important industries including mining, energy, defense, heavy rigging, shipping, and general transportation sectors.

However, with the advancement of wireless load cell technology, professional operators now have more compression load cell choices than ever before. Should you go with the old-school wired option or upgrade to a more modern wireless model? Read on to learn the advantages of each compression type load cell, plus our expert recommendation.

Wireless Compression Load Cells

Wireless compression load cells use an internal antenna to electronically transmit load cell readings and alerts to a wireless handheld readout device, computer, or smartphone.

Advantages

Where do we begin? By eliminating the need for external cables, wireless compression load cells offer a number of major advantages. First, you’re able to be more mobile on the job site and aren’t limited to a fixed location. As long as you’re within signal range, you can be anywhere you need to be. Next, you don’t have to deal with the complexity of setting up cables and running them around obstructions. This saves time and allows the load cells to be used in more diverse applications. In some cases, there is a moving part or other obstruction that makes wired cables nearly impossible. Wireless load cells also eliminate the cost and hassle of replacing cables once they wear out, making them much more cost-effective in the long run.

Plus, because wireless compression load cells are able to receive load cell data transmissions via computer and smartphone apps, it’s easier to translate the data and further process it. Wireless load cell software even allows operators to observe multiple load cells in parallel from a single workstation. Last but not least, wireless compression load cells are just plain safer than wired load cells. Depending on the brand of load cell you get, you can monitor transmissions from several thousand feet away. When the object in question is several tons, every foot of distance matters.

Straightpoint LoadSafe
wireless compress load cell from straightpoint
  • Best heavy-duty wireless compression load cell
  • 3,280-foot max wireless range
  • 5 ton to 1,000-ton capacities available
  • IP67 environmental protection
  • 1,200 hours of continuous battery life
  • +/- 0.1% accuracy
  • Bluetooth output option available
Straightpoint Loadblock Plus
low profile load cell from straightpoint
  • Best lighter-duty wireless compression load cell
  • 1-inch built-in digital display
  • 550 pound to 5-ton capacities available
  • IP65 environmental protection
  • 80 hours of continuous battery life
  • +/- 0.1% accuracy
  • Option to add cabled output

Wired Compression Load Cells

Wired compression load cells use a heavy-duty cable to connect and transmit readout data from the load cell to a compatible handheld load cell reader or computer.

Advantages

In some applications, such as subsea use, cabled load cells are necessary for accurate readings. Or, some operators might simply prefer the old-school cabled load cell setup as that is how they initially learned to set up compression load cells. Also, some may be concerned about the possibility of experiencing technical difficulties or radio interference with wireless load cells. Although this is mostly unfounded due to the advancement of wireless technology, load cells with physical analog outputs could be seen as more reliable to some.

Straightpoint Wired Compression Load Cell
cabled compression load cell
  • Best cabled compression load cell
  • Equipped with a 30-foot output cable
  • 5 ton to 1,000-ton capacities available
  • IP67 environmental protection
  • +/- 0.1% Accuracy

Best Compression Load Cell Brand

When purchasing new compression type load cells, you have many options. When you want a brand that’s extensively tested and trusted, we always recommend Straightpoint brand load cells. They’re a more durable and advanced load cell than anything else on the market, and they’re priced very reasonably. Plus, Straightpoint is now a Crosby company, so you know they’re a product you can trust to perform for years and years.

straightpoint compression load cells review

Conclusion

When deciding between wireless and wired compression load cells, it’s important to understand the advantages of each. Today, advances in technology have made wireless compression load cells a very efficient, flexible, and reliable choice for nearly any application where you need to measure compression or confirm the center of gravity. While some see cabled compression load cells as more reliable and simple to use, wireless load cells are increasingly becoming the better option.

At the end of the day, safety is what these important tools are all about. Given how safe, and simple, and cost-effective these modern wireless compression type load cells are, we regularly recommend them for most compression measuring applications.

Have questions? Contact our compression type load cell experts by calling 800-404-7068 or email us at customerservice@uscargocontrol.com.

Do You Know How Much That Weighs? Straightpoint Load Cells Do

USCC now offers a full selection of superior Straightpoint load cell solutions.

If you’re a professional in the rigging and lifting industry, you know that close is never close enough. And guesstimating? Well, that’s just not a great option when you’re talking about lifting a multi-ton load.

Just ask these guys.

Courtesy of: WOOD THINGS!

There’s no question, whether it’s tension on a wire rope assembly or compression caused by a heavy structure, it pays to “know your load” at all times. Be it tons, pounds, or kilograms – just the slightest miscalculation is enough to cause an expensive and perhaps even life-threatening accident.

Luckily, there are load monitoring load cells. Commonly referred to as “tensiometers” or “dynamometers”, load cells use electrical signals to precisely measure the tension of rigged loads involving wire rope, guy wire, synthetic rope, shackles, and other types of rigging equipment.

water testing using straightpoint wireless load cells

What’s the benefit of load cells for lifting?

Safety is of the utmost importance when it comes to complex rigging and heavy lift jobs. Many modern load cells allow operators to receive tension readouts from a safe distance, sometimes several thousand feet away. This is extremely important for applications involving overhead cranes, offshore drilling, tug testing, water bag testing, overhead weighing, cable laying, vehicle recovery, or any type of heavy-lift projects. But not all load cells are created equal.

What’s the best load cell available?

Straightpoint, a Crosby owned company, offers unrivaled load cell tension measurement tools. Their quality and functionality are unsurpassed by any other load cell brand in existence.

sp load cells in use
courtesy of: weighing review
straightpoint load cell supplier

Now, US Cargo Control is proud to be an official supplier of Straightpoint’s intelligent line of load cell load monitoring solutions, including Straightpoint’s long-range wireless load cells and intelligent load cell software that brings your safety into the 21st century.

insight software load cell reading

Don’t put your company and its priceless reputation in unnecessarily dangerous situations. Use Straightpoint Loadcells to take the weight off your shoulders and safety into the palm of your hand.

Types of load cells from Straightpoint

Wireless, Bluetooth-enabled, and classic cabled load cells are all available. Whether you need tension load cells, compression load cells, clamp-on line tensiometers, running line dynamometers, shackles load cells, or mini crane scales – USCC has you covered with a full selection of high-quality Straightpoint products.

Tension Load Cells

straightpoint load cells for tension readings

Tension load cells are great for a wide variety of applications. Radiolink Plus (wireless) and Wirelink Plus (cabled), can handle tension reading capacities up to 500-ton. Towcell is the perfect solution for vehicle load monitoring applications as it fits directly onto a 2” tow ball. 

Compression Load Cells

best compression load cells

Compression load cells are used to calculate the center of gravity. Straightpoint compression load cells can handle loads up to 1000-ton and you can read up to 100 wireless compression load cells from your computer or tablet and also create real-time test certificates on-site. Wired compression load cells are also available. 

Clamp on Line Tensiometers

best tensiometer for measuring wire rope and guy wire tension wirelessly

Straightpoint’s line tensiometer, the COLT, is an industry-leading smartphone-enabled clamp-on line tensiometer. It’s a fast and accurate way to measure wire rope or guy wire tension.

Running Line Dynamometers

best dynamometer for wire rope

Straightpoint’s line of running line dynamometers are able to measure tension, line speed, and distance of wire rope, fiber optic cables, and synthetic rope. These dynamometers are very useful in situations where there is no anchor or dead end on the line.

Shackle Load Cells

wireless load shackle from Straightpoint

Loadshackles from Straightpoint provide the perfect solution to limited headroom or super heavy-lift projects. Wireless load shackles, Bluetooth-only, and cabled versions are all available. Straightpoint Loadshackles are made using Crosby brand shackles. All Loadshackles from Straightpoint have a load-centering bobbin and range in capacity from 3.25- ton to 400-ton.

Miniweigher Crane Scales

best digital crane scale

Straightpoint Miniweigher Plus crane scales are compact, safe, accurate, and suitable for a number of applications. These wireless crane scales are often mounted between a winch and a tripod, allowing for load monitoring and safe lowering and raising of equipment and personnel. They’re able to handle up to 5 ton.

Straightpoint Loadcell output options

When it comes to viewing tension readings and remotely controlling Straightpoint Loadcells, you have options. Choose wired or wireless handheld controllers, laptop computer/smart device output, or even a wireless LCD scoreboard display.

SW-HHP handheld load cell readout device
load cell app for smartphone
wireless LCD load cell scoreboard

Remember, in addition to physical load cell equipment, US Cargo Control also offers compatible Straightpoint computer software and systems.

Expert answers to all your Straightpoint Loadcell questions

touring iuoe cranes and machinery

We have a team of lifting and rigging equipment specialists that understand Straightpoint Loadcell products in-and-out. Don’t hesitate to give them a call at 800-404-7068 for fast and friendly answers to all your load cell questions.

3 Factors to Consider When Choosing Lifting Slings

As objects are being lifted, the lifting sling could fail and lead to catastrophes. Read 3 factors to consider when choosing lifting slings.

One of the biggest causes of injuries and fatalities in the lifting and rigging industry is accidents caused by falls. As heavy objects are being lifted, sometimes the lifting sling can fail and lead to potential catastrophes. To prevent these situations, it is critical that you must use the correct types of lifting slings for your lifting jobs. Read 3 factors you should consider when choosing the right lifting sling, and learn the different types of slings we carry at US Cargo Control.

1. Know The Weight, Strength, and Delicacy of the Load

It’s important to know the weight and strength of the load that you intend to lift, as well as the WLL (Working Load Limit) of the sling. When you have an understanding of the object’s weight and strength, make sure you provide support from all directions. Providing support from the sides will prevent the object from falling, preventing injuries and risk to the workers on site.

The other thing that you should note is the fragility of the load you are lifting. The goal is to not only lift an object but protect the object from getting damaged in the lifting process. For lifting heavy objects or objects made of hard metals, we recommend using chain slings to perform the job.

Saw random numbers on your load-bearing equipment and didn’t know what they meant? Read what Working Load Limit, Breaking Strength, and Safety Factor mean.

2. Identify the Center of Gravity of the Load, and the Sling’s Flexibility

When you’re looking at the object you will be lifting, observe the object’s shape and design to tell you where the center of gravity is. You do not want to miss the center of the load before you begin to lift because you can potentially thrust the load and cause damage. If you’re lifting irregularly-shaped loads, consider using nylon slings as these have great flexibility and strength.

3. Do the Objects have Sharp Edges?

You’re going to lift objects that have sharp edges. Although nylon slings work best for loads needed for flexibility, the fabric will not perform well because it will be fighting against sharp edges. They will cause ripping to the sling, and this will likely result in the object falling and getting damaged.

If you’re having to lift objects with sharp edges, we recommend using chain slings or wire rope slings. We also carry corner protectors that can cover the edges of the object and protect your slings and chains.

What Are the Different Types of Slings?

Now that you know the three critical factors to consider when choosing a sling, you need to learn the many different types of slings there are. This will help you identify which sling is worth the investment for your lifting situations.

Nylon Slings

US Cargo Control nylon lifting sling

Known as synthetic web slings or nylon web slings, our nylon lifting straps perform well for lifting breakable, delicate objects. Its heavy-duty synthetic material has great stretch and flexibility that help the slings mold to the shape of the load. Not only that, the nylon lifting sling’s material is treated to improve abrasion resistance and reduce wear, even in the most rigorous lifting applications.

They are lightweight, easy to handle, and offer a wider body with more stretch than a polyester sling. Its attributes make synthetic slings a popular choice for rigging purposes and are essential to have around, but they should not be used in extreme or rugged conditions. Nylon rigging straps will wear down more quickly than other types of slings if you go against its limits!

Chain Slings

If you’re depending on a sling that requires extra strength and durability, the chain sling is your best choice. The chain lifting sling is the strongest and most durable type of sling and is highly popular to use for heavy lifting operations. They will perform better than polyester round slings or nylon slings because they’re more durable, tolerant to hot temperatures, and cut-resistant. When we say chain slings are tolerant to hot temperatures, this means they are useful for lifts in extremely hot temperatures or to secure extremely hot objects.

We offer three trusted brands of lifting chain slings, Crosby, KWB, and Pewag. We offer chain slings from these brands because we want you to have the highest-quality slings that will perform the lifting job successfully. We sell these in two types, standard and adjustable, and we also offer custom options if needed.

We recently added a full line of Grade 120 chain and components that are now available at US Cargo Control. Read more about Grade 120 and its benefits.

Polyester Round Slings

Polyester slings can be confused with nylon slings due to their material that is also made of a web-like fabric. The difference is that while nylon slings stretch easily, polyester round slings have a little stretch to them. These are useful to have for lifting operations where strength is needed, but not a lot of stretch needed.

Manufactured in the USA from a continuous loop of polyester yarn that creates exceptional strength, the round slings are versatile, pliable, convenient, and cost-effective. Because of their many benefits, you can use these in vertical, choker, or basket hitches, making them effective to lift a wide variety of cargo!

Curious about the differences between nylon slings and polyester slings? Read Polyester Slings vs Nylon Slings: Which Web Sling Type is Better?

Wire Rope Slings

US Cargo Control wire slings

Known as steel cable or wire sling, these are more durable than synthetic slings and more cost-effective than chain slings. Wire rope slings are an excellent choice not only for lifting, but also for hoisting, towing, or anchoring loads. Its fabrication offers abrasion-resistance and heat-resistance, as they are made by weaving individual strands or wire around a core.

Wire rope slings are favorable by riggers as they can come in a wide variety of materials, diameters, and configurations. Each steel wire rope configuration will offer different benefits and are suited to certain applications. For example, a smaller number of large outer wires offers better wear and corrosion resistance, while a larger number will provide better flexibility and fatigue-resistance.

If you would like to learn more about wire rope configuration, see our category on wire rope.

Tackle the Toughest Lifting Jobs with High-Quality Rigging Hardware

We know the importance of quality when it comes to rigging supplies. We carry a variety of rigging hardware, as well as lifting beams and spreader bars that are designed to lift heavy loads safely and efficiently.

We also do custom orders! Need a custom lifting sling? We can do that! We can customize a lifting sling to meet your specific needs.

Contact our sales team today at 866-444-9990. Our team of product experts is here to answer any questions about rigging hardware, lifting slings, and more.

New Crosby® Product Additions at US Cargo Control

We expanded our selection of rigging hardware and rigging supplies to meet your lifting needs.

We recently launched 57 Crosby® products to the site! We expanded our selection of rigging hardware and rigging supplies so we can continue to meet your lifting needs. As an authorized Crosby® distributor, we’re proud to sell many Crosby® rigging items from the company’s diverse portfolio. Continue reading to learn more about the latest product additions:

Crosby® HR-125 Swivel Hoist Rings

crosby swivel hoist rings

Swivel hoist rings have always been a popular choice for rigging and lifting applications. If you are involved in a lifting application where continued movements at mulitple directions will occur, you will have more success using the HR-125 Swivel Hoist Ring than the standard eye bolt.

You can still use the standard eyebolt for lifting applications, but it will only perform straight pulls. If pulled at any other angle, it will result in extreme loss of rated working load limit. The HR-125 Swivel Hoist Ring can pivot and swivel at multiple directions, as the pivot pivots 180° and the base swivels at 360°.

Crosby® HR-1000 Heavy Lift Swivel Hoist Rings

crosby lifting products, featuring Heavy Duty Hoist Ring

If you come across a “Heavy Lift” Swivel Hoist Ring, you won’t be disappointed with this item. The Heavy Lift Swivel Hoist Ring has increased toughness that can hold up in potentially harsh conditions. Along with that, it has a larger opening than the standard Swivel Hoist Ring. This will allow you to easily attach sling hooks and other lifting fittings for quick securement.

Just like the HR-125 Swivel Hoist Ring, the Heavy Lift Swivel Hoist Ring can pivot at 180° and swivel at 360° in multiple directions. These hoist rings are beefier than then HR-125 line of hoist rings and are great to use for heavy-duty performance.

Crosby® SL-150 Slide-Loc® Hoist Ring

crosby slide loc

If you’re looking for a hoist ring that has tool-free installation, the SL-150 Slide Loc will do the job. The Slide-Loc features a patent-pending mechanism that doesn’t require you to use any tools to install this.

The patent-pending mechanism has a locking component that easily slides back to make this hoist ring ready for lifting. Along with that, it has a red QUIC-CHECK® mark to ensure that the Slide-Loc is ready for lifting. Its other unique features are having a larger eye-opening for easy lifting hook access and a 360° swiveling bail.

Crosby® G-402 Eye & Eye Swivel

crosby's eye and eye swivel at US Cargo Control

The G-402 Eye & Eye Swivel will prevent unnecessary twisting and binding of slings and other attachments. This is perfect for those who are seeking for a swivel that eliminates tangling! You use this swivel’s connecting links to connect a fixed connection point with a sling leg or wire rope to keep the connection intact and prevent side loads. You can integrate the connection points into the machine or as a bolt-on type applications such as eyebolts or hoist rings.

Keep in mind that the G-402 Eye & Eye Swivels are positioning devices and cannot rotate under load.

Crosby® G-403 Jaw & Eye Swivel

Crosby's jaw and eye swivel at US Cargo Control

The Jaw and Eye Swivel, or known as Jaw End Swivel, prevent unnecessary twisting and binding of slings and other attachments. Just like the G-402 Eye & Eye Swivel, you use the Jaw Swivel’s connecting links to connect a fixed connection point with a sling leg or wire rope to keep the connection intact and prevent side loads. You can integrate the connection points into the machine or as a bolt-on type applications such as eyebolts or hoist rings.

The only difference between the Jaw Swivel and the Eye Swivel is the Jaw Swivel has a screw pin. The Eye Swivel has a circular opening that you must clip something to. Read more about the differences in snap shackles in Snap Shackles: What Can I Use a Quick Release Shackle For?

Keep in mind that the G-403 Jaw & Eye Swivels are positioning devices and cannot rotate under load.

Crosby® S-421T Wedge Sockets

crosby s 421t wedge socket available at US Cargo Control

Lastly, we have the TERMINATOR™ Wedge Socket that is destined to be the last wedge socket you’ll ever need! With the end-user in mind, this item has several reasons to why you should switch to this wedge socket. Compared to the “old style” wedge, this wedge has been extended in length.  The added length allows a Crosby Regi-Bolt G450 wire rope clip, the same size as the wire rope used in the socket, to be easily attached. This helps secures the tail or “dead end” of the rope to the wedge to eliminate loss or “punch out” of the wedge. 

The wedge has QUIC-CHECK® “Go” and “No-Go” feature cast into the wedge to ensure the proper sizing of the rope. Utilizing a standard Crosby Red-U-Bolt®, these wedge socket terminations are especially useful in situations where quick or frequent rope replacement is necessary.

More Information on Rigging and Lifting Gear

Don’t know the difference between the many types of shackles? Read The Differences Between the Types of Shackles.

Unsure which type of lifting sling you need? Check out our post How to Choose a Lifting Sling and learn more about the difference between standard and adjustable chain slings.

Unsure when it is time for new rigging gear? We have some tips on how to tell when it’s time to look into new rigging gear when you’re in the process of inspecting your lifting hardware.

Saw random numbers on your load-bearing equipment and confused about what they mean? Read our post on Working Load Limit, Breaking Strength & Safety Factor: What Do They Mean?

Are you ready to get your hands on some Crosby® products? Contact our sales team today at 866-444-9990. Our team of product experts is here to answer any questions about rigging hardware, lifting slings, and more.

Grade 120 Chain and Components at US Cargo Control

We’ve added a wide selection of the strongest and toughest chain grade components to our inventory.

A full line of Grade 120 chain and chain sling components are now available through US Cargo Control.

Grade 120 is a high-strength, ultra-premium quality alloy steel with the highest working load limits in the industry. Now it’s easier than ever to get the G120 products you need to tackle the toughest overhead lifting and transportation jobs.

We’ve added a wide selection of the strongest and toughest chain grade components to our stock. And with a large inventory of bulk g120 chain, fittings, chain and binder kits, and more, you can count on US Cargo Control for all of your Grade 120 transport and rigging and lifting needs!

4 Benefits of Grade 120 Components

Length of blue grade 120 chain showcasing the square-link design.

1. It’s the Strongest Chain in the Industry

Grade 120 chain and components are 50% stronger than Grade 80 and 20% stronger than Grade 100 products. That added strength means you can select a smaller chain size for the job that’s lighter in weight and easier to handle – all without sacrificing working load limits.

2. It’s Extremely Durable

G120 chain features a revolutionary square link design that offers superior fatigue and bending resistance, making it an excellent choice for a wide variety of lifting applications. The patented square profile also offers increased contact between the surfaces on the links, resulting in a better grip than a traditional round link-style chain. A blue powder-coated finish adds corrosion protection.

3. It’s Easy to Identify

All Grade 120 Chain and Components feature a light-blue powder coating for quick and easy identification. You will also find either “120” or “12” markings on the chain and components as additional identification as Grade 120 alloy.

4. It’s Made by Pewag

Our Grade 120 chain and components are made by Pewag, an industry leader in quality chain products. With a history dating back over 500 years, Pewag is an established and trusted manufacturer in the transportation and lifting industries.

Grade 120 Chain Slings

Chain slings manufactured with grade 120 chains offer the highest strength available on the market. They are excellent for heavy-duty lifting applications.

There are two main types of lifting slings: standard and adjustable. Both options allow the user to customize the sling to suit their specific lifting application. Choose from several options including the number of legs, length of the chain, and type of end fitting.

Blue Grade 120 standard chain sling with a sling hook and oblong link at opposing ends of the length of chain.

Standard Chain Sling

Features a fixed-length of Grade 120 Chain and available in a variety of length and end fitting combinations

Blue adjustable single-leg chain sling with a sling hook and oblong link at opposing ends of the length of chain.

Adjustable Chain Sling

Can be designed with the same leg configurations as standard slings, but an additional fitting allows the user to adjust the length of the chain.

Grade 120 Fittings

We stock a wide selection of G120 end fittings. Like all Grade 120 components, end-fittings all feature the distinctive blue powder-coat finish for superior corrosion protection and easy identification. Some of the most common options include:

Blue Grade 120 oblong master link ring.

Oblong Master Links are used at the top of chain slings.

Blue Grade 120 grab hook.

Eye Grab Hooks are designed for optimal interaction between chain and hook, making them excellent for a variety of lifting applications.

Blue Grade 120 self-locking hook.

Self-Locking Hooks feature a larger opening than typical eye sling hooks and automatically close and lock under load.

Blue Grade 120 sling hook with silver galvanized safety latch.

A Sling Hook has a forged and galvanized safety latch for a secure connection in a variety of lifting applications.

Tackle The Toughest Lifting Jobs With Grade 120

We recommend heavy-duty Grade 120 Chain for the toughest jobs. Whether you are in the trucking and transportation or lifting and rigging industries, the high-strength and superior quality of G120 alloy steel can stand up to even the most demanding applications.

If you’re looking for more information on chain slings, check out our main chain slings page on our website or our lifting slings category on our blog.


Are you ready to get your hands on some Grade 120 products? Contact our sales team today at 800-404-7068. Our team of product experts is here to answer any questions about rigging chain, lifting slings, and more.


We also do custom orders! Need a custom lifting sling? We can do that! Because we assemble all of our Grade 120 chain slings in-house, we can customize a lifting sling to meet your specific needs.

4 Types of Cargo Control Nets and Their Different Applications

Netting can have many different uses including personnel safety, containing debris, or transporting cargo – but having the right net for your application is crucial.

Debris Netting, Personnel Safety Netting, Lifting Netting, & Pickup Truck Netting.

Netting can have many different uses including personnel safety, containing debris, or transporting cargo – but having the right net for your application is crucial. Not only will you prevent damage with the proper net, but you will also provide safety for yourself and others. Whether used at construction sites, transportation projects, or for a weekend project, nets will protect workers, pedestrians, vehicles, and nearby property.

At US Cargo Control, we carry and customize 4 types of cargo nets: Scaffold & Debris Nets, Personnel Safety Nets, Lifting Nets, and Truck Loading Nets. Read on below to learn more about these nets.

FUN FACT: OUR MANUFACTURING TEAM CAN CUSTOM MAKE NETTING TO MATCH YOUR SPECIFIC, INDIVIDUAL NEEDS.

1. Scaffold and Debris Nets

Made of polypropylene, scaffold and debris nets are commonly used in the agriculture and construction industries. These nets offer protection for both workers and individuals around the building site, as well as other properties. Scaffold nets reduce the risk of accidents, improve productivity, and shortens cleanup time.

You can also use these nets as bridge debris netting, which surrounds a bridge while undergoing work to protect pedestrians, workers, vehicles and other properties from falling debris. This net is especially ideal for situations where debris may fall into rivers and streams. A durable, economical and eco-friendly net, the net makes clean up safer and minimize liabilities.

2. Personnel Safety Nets

Manufactured in a knotted nylon twine, personnel safety nets can be used for any type of construction such as building and bridge construction, tunnel construction, and highway overpass construction. The netting consists of attachment hooks and a high-tenacity polyamide fiber for a strong end-product with plenty of durability and efficiency. These nets provide not just on-the-job safety, but also protect nearby property and prevent loss of time and job site materials.

3. Lifting Nets

Lifting nets are excellent to use for lifting a variety of cargo that’s either heavy and/or an awkward shape, or any cargo that is difficult to accommodate with traditional webbing lifting slings. It is manufactured in high-tenacity polypropylene fiber which is considered “knotless” due to the unique knitting construction.

Our lifting nets are also designed with a nylon peripheral rope for each of the four loops to create a balanced support system. The net encloses around the cargo, providing securement and balanced lifting, without adding excessive weight like a chain sling or lifting beam often can.

4. Pickup Truck Cargo Nets

Pickup truck cargo nets are a quick and easy way to secure your load while on the road. We offer cargo nets that are designed for shorter bed pickup trucks and ones for long-bed pickup trucks. To provide the best quality with the best security for your load, both nets come with S-hooks and cam buckles for quick attachment and securement.

In addition, each strap of the cargo net is attached with a 5k D-ring, so you will never have to worry about damaging or losing your cargo.

Read more on 3 Popular Heavy-Duty Cargo Nets for Pickup Truck Beds

Want a Sneak Peek on How we Make Custom Cargo Nets?

Curious about how our manufacturing team creates these custom nets? Watch the video below to learn how we work to turn your custom specifications into a one-of-a-kind cargo net that meets your needs.

We have a team that is dedicated to making sure our customers get the quality products they need. If you wish to learn more about the nets we carry and create, head over to US Cargo Control or give our team a call at (866) 444-9990.

Working Load Limit, Breaking Strength & Safety Factor: What Do They Mean?

Ever saw random numbers on your load-bearing equipment and didn’t know what they mean? Read to learn what working load limit, break strength, and safety factor mean.

Have you picked up a ratchet strap and saw numbers labeled on the strap, and wonder what they mean? Chances are you’re reading the working load limit or break strength. Every piece of load-bearing equipment states these requirements to let you know how much weight that piece of rigging is capable of securing.

When it comes to securing fragile or heavy loads, it is crucial that the product can secure the load without breaking. Although these terms are normally stated, there is confusion about what these terms mean. Read on below to learn what working load limit, break strength, and safety factor mean.

What Does Working Load Limit Mean?

shackle displaying the wll
Displaying a Shackle with the Working Load Limit

Many people ask about the working load limit, and this is a term to not mix up with breaking strength. Abbreviated as WLL, it is the rating that should never be exceeded when using a product like a ratchet strap. Before using a piece of load-bearing equipment, always make sure to look at the working load limit before use as it is the maximum allowable loading force.

Something to keep in mind is the working load limit is always 1/3 of the breaking strength. So if a ratchet strap has a breaking strength of 15,000 pounds, then the strap will have a working load limit of 5,000 pounds.

To learn how to secure your cargo, read how to use tie downs to secure cargo loads safely and legally.

If the Working Load Limit is Included, is the Break Strength Important?

breaking strength meaning displayed on our tag
Displaying a custom strap with the Break Strength and Working Load Limit

The break strength is equally as important as the working load limit. The break strength refers to the point at which your load-bearing equipment will fail. It is expressed in pounds and/or kilograms, and will actually fail if you go over the required amount.

When a ratchet strap is made with webbing, end fittings, and a ratchet all with a 10,000-pound breaking strength, then the break strength of the overall product will stay 10,000 pounds. However, if the same strap has a ratchet with an 8,000-pound break strength, then that would reduce the product’s strength to 8,000.

What is the Correlation with Safety Factor?

factor of safety, what is factor of safety?
Multiple tie downs securing cargo loads

Safety factor, also known as Design Factor, determines the ratio between the working load limit and break strength. The working load limit’s rating should never exceed when using a sling or tiedown, and this safety factor provides an allowance for shock loading, G force, and other unforeseen factors.

How Do I Know my Load-Bearing Equipment is Failing?

To make sure your lifting equipment is performing its best, perform an inspection. If you see any damage to the product, dispose of it. To give you an insight into what kind of damage you can potentially see, read these examples:

  • Holes, tears, cuts, snags, or embedded particles
  • Broken or worn stitching
  • Abrasive wear
  • Bending
  • Melting, charring, or weld spatter
  • Acid or alkali burns
  • Any other visible damage which causes doubt to the strength of the equipment

When selecting a ratchet strap, lifting sling, shackle, or any other product, select the product that has suitable characteristics for the type of load, environment, and attachment to the vehicle.

At US Cargo Control, we want you to be safe when securing heavy loads. If you have any questions about the safety requirements, give our team a call at 800-404-7068.

Extracting a Stuck Vehicle

When extracting a stuck vehicle, many factors can affect the actual pulling force needed. Read on to learn what they are.

How to Calculate Minimum Winching Effort & Minimum Working Load Limit

extracting a stuck vehicle calculation formula

When extracting a stuck vehicle, many factors can affect the actual pulling force needed, as well as selecting recovery equipment with high enough load ratings.

During a recent Iowa Corn Growers Event hosted at US Cargo Control headquarters, Tim Sanders, a Trucking and Transporation expert, and USCC business development specialist, gave an informative overview of what goes into effectively extracting a vehicle that’s stuck in the mud, sand, gravel, snow, etc.

When work needs to get done, it may seem tempting to just grab a strap or chain and pull until something happens. However, if you take a few minutes to do some simple calculations, you’ll likely save time in the long run and more importantly, help ensure the safety of those around the extraction scene.

The formula for calculating the required minimum recovery capacity

Total vehicle weight (W), additional rolling resistance (ARR), and additional gradient resistance (AGR). Once you have these calculations, you can quickly determine the recovery equipment strength you will need:

  1. What does the stuck vehicle weight, including all cargo, attachments, trailers, etc.?

    This is the “W” part of the formula.
  2. What factors will add to the pulling effort and safe working load limits required to pull the total weight of the vehicle?

    When we say “additional factors” we’re mainly talking about two things: additional rolling resistance (ARR) and additional gradient resistance (AGR)

Minimum Capacity Required = W + ARR + AGR

tim sander USCC sales and trucking gear expert
USCC Business Development Specialist, Tim Sanders, shares how to determine the minimum recovery equipment capacity required for extracting a vehicle to a crowd of Iowa Corn Grower Members

Calculating additional rolling resistance

Additional rolling resistance (ARR) is essentially the surface in which the vehicle is stuck or will need to get over in order to become free. Different surface types have different multipliers that, when multiplied by the total vehicle weight, give you the “ARR.”

Keep in mind that these calculations assume the wheels are level with each other.

how to calculate additional rolling resistance by surface type
This chart shows the multipliers for different surface types. Multiply the total weight of the stuck vehicle by the appropriate multiplier to get total “ARR.”

Calculating gradient resistance

Gradient resistance (AGR) is simply the degree of slope that the extraction may take place on. The greater the slope, the higher the multiplier. Again, you will take the total weight of the stuck vehicle and multiply by the appropriate multiplier.

chart for calculating gradient resistance when extracting a stuck vehicle
This chart shows the multipliers for different degrees of slope. Multiply the total weight of the stuck vehicle by the appropriate multiplier to get total “AGR.”

Example Calculation

Let’s say the total weight of the stuck vehicle is 42,000 lbs., and it’s stuck in the snow with a 15-degree slope. Can you figure out the minimum capacity required? Remember the formula is:

Minimum Capacity Required = W + ARR + AGR

See below for the answer.

example calculation of minimum capacity required
Assuming all the factors on the left side of this chart, here is how to calculate the minimum capacity required for extracting a vehicle

Selecting the right recovery straps

Make sure the working load limit of the recovery equipment is greater than the minimum capacity required. Additional resistance could be encountered when the stuck vehicle is deeply submerged, or there is damage to the vehicle that prevents it from moving. When in doubt contact a vehicle recovery expert.

More Vehicle Recovery Resources

If you’re needing to pull an automobile out of snow that’s close to a public roadway, there are specific steps to take to ensure safety beyond just recovery capacity. Click the link above to learn what they are.

We also have resources that cover the common questions our team gets like how to choose a recovery strap and auto-recovery straps vs. tow straps.

If you have further questions on recovery straps and safe vehicle extraction, give Tim or anyone on our team a call at 800-969-6543.

NOTE: This article contains important safety information about the use of synthetic web slings. However, it does not contain all the information you need to know about handling, lifting, and manipulating materials and loads safely. Sling use is only one part of a lifting system and it is your responsibility to consider all risk factors prior to using any rigging device or product. Failure to do this may result in severe injury or death due to sling failure and/or loss of load