How to Create Tie Down Points Using L Track Single Receivers

This video explains the uses for our airline track single receivers and single stud fittings with o-rings. This item features a 2″ round base with two holes for mounting on pickup beds, RV’s, trailers, etc. The spring-loaded plunger squeezes easily to slide into the base and snap in place. It can be used to tie down motorcycles, ATV’s, lawn mowers, snowmobiles and any other cargo you need to secure.

The logistic track single receivers can be mounted virtually anywhere you need an anchor point for a tie down. The 2″ base is as strong as the fitting itself, and depends on strong fasteners to hold it down. You want to use solid fasteners, preferably a bolt or machine screw, that’s going to go all the way through what your mounting to. Don’t forget a nut and washer on the back side.

Once your receivers are fastened, your items can be strapped down using a ratchet strap with an s-hook, bungee cords, rope or anything else that is suitable. Check out our motorcycle combo strap kit that includes tie down straps with s-hooks for use in your assembly.

For more information or to purchase the items in this video, click on the links below:

View our Anchor Point Tie Down Kit below:

How To Create a Motorcycle Tie Down System in a Pickup Truck Using LTrack

This video shows how L-track (also known as L track, airline track or logistic track) is used to create a motorcycle tie down system in a pickup truck. L-track installed on a the bed rails of a truck provides a wide variety of anchor points to tie down motorcycles, ATVs or other cargo you want to haul.

For more information or to purchase the items in this video, click on the links below:

View all motorcycle tie down system kits.

 

How to Create Tie Down Anchor Points with E-Track Singles

E-track singles create anchor points for small spaces such as pickup boxes, moving dollies, or anywhere you need a tie-down point. This short video explains what they are and places you might want to install them. See the full transcript below.

For more information or to purchase products used in this video, click on the links below:

This is an e-track single fitting. Typically e-track comes in long sections and it’s found in the back of trucks and trailers to provide anchor points for tying down ATVs, snowmobiles, motorcycles and even cars. The etrack single is really handy because it can be installed in truck beds, toy haulers, and trailers.

Or if you’re in a factory setting, it can be installed on carts or pallets and it provides a good anchor point for attaching e-track fittings or e-track straps to keep cargo secure as it moves through your work space.

E-track fittings can be found on the end of e-track ratchet straps and e-track cam buckle straps. The combination of the etrack receiver and fitting is very strong and secure, and it locks into the receiver until you release the spring lever.

The placement options for e-track single receivers are really up to your imagination. One option is on the side of the tail gate of a pick up truck. It’s slim enough so it won’t impede the closing of the tail gate but it gives you an anchor point for tying down materials that would lie on the tailgate itself, such as lumber.

L-Track Fittings: Small But Mighty

What’s round, measures less than 2″ high, yet has the ability to withstand up to 4,000 lbs. of pressure? A single L-track fitting with round ring.

This simple workhorse is easy to install- just attach the round airline track single base using screws and click the fitting into the recessed area. But more importantly, these little pieces are big on versatility. While longer L-track sections – such as the popular 24 inch aluminum L-track rail – are traditionally used on a trailer to secure motorcycles and ATVs with 2-inch tie down straps, these single L-track fittings can be placed anywhere you need an anchor point. They’re the perfect solution if you’re short on space and a full track length won’t fit, such as behind a wheel well in a trailer, or if placing a full track isn’t an ideal option, such as on the tailgate of a pickup truck.

But don’t limit L-track singles to just a trailer or truck: use them in the garage, shed, utility room, barn- the possibilities are endless. Attach one to the garage wall, add a cinch strap  to the ring and you instantly have a place to hang hoses, rope, cords, wire, etc. The round ring can also accommodate a bungee cord or rubber tarp strap hook for lots of lighter duty applications. And the strength capacity makes them great for securing heavier items as well. In fact, manufacturing shops attach these single anchor points on carts to secure items for transport within the facility, so consider them of use on an ATV, utility tractor, etc.

The L-track name comes from the term “logistic track” and is sometimes also referred to as L track or airline track, because it’s used in the airline industry to secure seating components. The longer track pieces are ideal if you need an adjustable anchor point, as it’s designed with several indentions for the fitting to secure. However, when space is tight and there not enough room for an entire track length, a single l-track fitting is the perfect solution.

Watch this video: How to install a motorcycle tie down system in a pickup truck using logistic track, for more information.

How To Insert an E-track Fitting into an E-track Rail Section

For more information or to buy the items shown in this video, click on the links below:

E-track fittings are easy to insert and remove from etrack sections:

1.) Hold the fitting at a downward angle while pulling up on the locking pin using your index finger.

2.) Insert the lowered end of the fitting into the E-track and then lower the opposite end. Once the fitting is in place, release the pin and the E-track fitting is securely fastened.

3.) To remove the fitting, pull the release lever and lift the fitting out at an angle.

US Cargo Control has a variety of E-track fittings and E-track straps for sale. If you have questions about any of our E track products, our customer service specialists are ready to help- call us at 866-444-9990 from 7-5 CT, Monday – Friday.

How To Install E-Track on a Flat Trailer

For more information or to purchase the products in this video, click on the links below:

E-track tie down systems for flat trailers are ideal for transporting motorcycles, ATVs, utility vehicles, snowmobiles and automobiles. E-track provides numerous tie down points to secure your cargo using d-ring fittings and/or E-track straps.

You will need the following tools and fasteners to install e-track on a flatbed trailer:

  • Cordless drill driver
  • Measuring tape
  • Drill bits
  • Phillips head driver bits
  • Adjustable wrench
  • Pencil or marker
  • 1/4″ X 1.5″ hex bolts
  • 1/4″ lock nuts
  • 1/4″ flat washers with an outside diameter of 3/4″

1.) Lay out the E-track sections on the trailer in the approximate place where they’ll be attached. This will help you visualize what the finished project will look like.

2.)  Measure and mark where each E-track section will be fastened. Adjust the e-track rails so that they are straight and aligned properly with the trailer as well as with each accompanying section.

3.) On the trailer surface, mark where the trailer’s underlying frame members are. In this installation method, the E-track is only fastened to the wood decking and not through the framing members. Marking the decking of the trailer will easily identify where you will not be placing a bolt.

4.) Once the E-track has been placed on the trailer and all the measurements are finalized, you are ready to begin drilling through the trailer’s wood deck for placement of the 1/4″ bolts. Beginning with the end of the 8′ e-track section, drill a hole on both sides of the e track at every fourth hole. It is not necessary or desirable to drill every hole.

5.) After all the drilling is completed, insert a 1/4″ x 1-1/2″ zinc plated hex bolt down through the e-track and trailer deck. From the bottom, add a washer and nut and tighten.

6.) Install #10 x 3/4″ wood screws in the galvanized e-track. Beginning at the end of one of the track sections, fasten the wood screws evenly between each of the hex bolts. This configuration provides for one open hole between the screw and the next hex bolt and securely fastens the tie down rails firmly to the trailer. Repeat this process for remaining E track sections.

How & when to use ratchet straps and cam buckle straps

This video details the difference types of ratchet strap fittings, how to use a ratchet strap, and how ratchet straps and cam buckle straps are different.

Ratchet straps & cam straps

Ratchet straps and cam buckles are used to secure various types of cargo and come in various sizes from 1″ on up to 4″ widths.

The ratchet strap comes with many fittings: chain extensions, d-rings, e-track fitting, e-track double stud fitting, f-track hook and spring e-fitting, flat hook, flat snap hook, j-hook with d-ring, s-hook, and vinyl coated wire hooks.

Polyester webbing is used for cargo securement because of its low stretch rate. It’s also very abrasion-resistant.

How to thread a ratchet strap

To thread a ratchet strap, first open your ratchet a little bit so you have access to the take up spool. Now you slide the strap through the spool and bring it right back around on itself. At this point, pull on the strap to remove the excess slack. Once all the slack is removed you can start to ratchet to the tension you want, keeping the strap straight. Once you have reached your desired tension, lock the ratchet down in its closed position. To release the strap, open the ratchet all the way so it lays completely flat. Once it is flat, is in the release position. Go ahead and pull your strap out.

In some cases you may not need the strength of a ratchet strap. In those cases you would use a cam buckle.

Cam straps come with various fittings: butterfly fittings, e-track fittings, f-track hook and spring e-fittings, handlebar straps with s-hooks, flat snap hooks and s-hooks.

Cam buckles typically come in 1″ and 2″ sizes.

How to thread a cam buckle

To thread a cam buckle, turn the cam buckle over and feed the strap back through while pressing the thumb release. While pressing the thumb release, pull the strap to your desired tension, then release. To remove the strap, press the thumb button and simply pull the strap. You don’t have to pull the strap all the way out, just enough to get to your cargo.

In choosing between a ratchet strap and a cam buckle, it usually comes down to the working load limit, or how fragile the product is. If it is something light and fragile, choose a cam buckle since you’re not able to over-tension and possibly crush the product. If it’s anything heavier, less fragile, a ratchet strap is generally a better choice.