US Cargo Control Straps Trusted to Secure Professional Race Car

Abbate pic 4
Michele Abbate behind the wheel of her 2013 Scion FR-S race car.

US Cargo Control straps can be used to tie down some pretty precious cargo, but for professional race car driver Michele Abbate they are used to secure her most prized possession – her car.

Racing has been a big part of Abbate’s life since she was a child. The Las Vegas native says she’s been following racing since she was just a kid. Her older brother started racing when he was 10-years-old, and the family always traveled with him and cheered him on. It wasn’t until she turned 16-years-old that Abbate put herself in the driver’s seat and her own racing career took off.

“I was always intrigued by anything with a motor, because it was always in my life – my love was truly for wheel to wheel racing, because it was always where my passion led to,” Abbate said.

Abbate got her start racing autocross with her every day car – the same car she used to get to work and the grocery store was racing in local and regional autocross events. Her racing operation has since expanded to include a 2013 Scion FR-S race car and licenses with both the National Auto Sports Association and Sports Car Club of America.

It hasn’t been an easy journey. Abbate has overcome some serious roadblocks along the way.

Last year, she lost her title sponsor three days before her first race. That disappointing news forced her to become her own team owner, start a massive fundraising campaign and build her own race car. She and her crew-chief constructed the car and now run all the maintenance and repairs themselves.

“We are a two man team on a tight budget, but we are out there finishing in front of a lot of the big boys,” Abbate said. “He and I put in the blood, sweat, tears and finances to keep the team running.”

So when we say the race car is valuable – we mean it.

US Cargo Control 2'' ratchet straps used to secure the back of the race car to the transport trailer.
US Cargo Control 2” ratchet straps used to secure the back of the race car to the trailer.

Abbate trusts US Cargo Control to keep her car safe and secure as she travels all over the country for about ten races each year. Right now, she’s using 2’’ olive green ratchet straps with double J hooks to secure the back of her car to the trailer. She selected the color to coordinate with her car.

For the front, she uses US Cargo Control’s superior, heavy- duty BlackLine ratchet straps. She says they are the only straps she’s encountered that don’t snag, shear or rip while tied-down to the front of her car.

US Cargo Control heavy-duty, BlackLine straps trusted secure the front of the car.
US Cargo Control heavy-duty, BlackLine straps trusted secure the front of the race car.

“We have been using our BlackLines for over six months and they still look brand new,” Abbate said. “There’s nothing better than knowing you have the right tools for the job and we are thankful to have US Cargo’s products with us.”

Racing is a stressful gig and it isn’t just on the track.

Abbate says financing is her biggest struggle. Last year, she launched a crowdsourcing campaign, raising more than $13,000 to fund her 2015 racing season.

“At races we strive to have the best equipment, set up, and attitude; and off the track we work equally as hard to promote, expand, and advertise for all of our partners that make this possible,” Abbate said.

US Cargo Control is proud to provide products that give Abbate and her team peace of mind as she strives for greatness. To learn more about Abbate and her racing operation visit her website.

Michele Abbate with her self built FR-S Photo Credit: Richard Pochop
Michele Abbate with her self built FR-S. Photo Credit: Richard Pochop

 

Wear Sleeves for Tie Down Straps

image of cordura wear strap Protective wear sleeves for tie down straps are one of the best investments you can make for extending the life of your strap.

These lightweight yet rugged strap protectors are also known as Cordura Wear pads due to the common use of CORDURA® fabric in many of the sleeves. Today, most of these popular protective sleeves for tie down straps are made of a generic ballistic nylon fabric, but still offers the same superior abrasion- and cut-resistance. It’s important to note that a protective wear sleeve will not add any strength to the strap or increase its working load limit or break strength.

A protective wear pad can be used with all sizes and types of webbing, and the simple tube design fits snug enough to stay in place, yet can still be moved to the area on the strap where you need it. Because it’s movable, you can place it so it’s also in contact with the cargo, reducing sliding strap marks on the load.

Cordura wear sleeves are also customizable since they can be ordered by the foot. Widths available include:

Protective Wear Sleeves for 1″ Webbing
Protective Wear Sleeves for 2″ Webbing
Protective Wear Sleeves for 3″ Webbing
Protective Wear Sleeves for 4″ Webbing

Because the nylon fabric is designed to fit snug against the webbing, they can sometimes be challenging to slide on. To install, fold the webbing in half, push through the sleeve, then unfold and pull to straighten.

How to Install L-Track Singles

23573-anchor-point-tie-down-kit-w-round-base_1_375
2″ Round Anchor Point Tie Down Kit (#APK2RBL)

l-track singles from US Cargo ControlLike L-track rails, L-track singles are incredibly versatile. They’re great for adding a tie down point just where you need it, but the small size offers up even more options than a full length track.

In this video, we installed our 2″ Track Anchor Point Tie Down System, which includes 4 sets of a round anchor, bolt plate, ring, and fasteners. This kit is also available with rectangular anchor points here: 2″ Track Anchor Point Tie Down System-Rectangular.

We set up this system with two points secured to the floor and two on the front wall of the truck bed.

Products used:

Tools required:

  • Cordless drill with 1/4 inch drill bit
  • Philips screwdriver
  • 7/16 wrench
  • Tape measure and Sharpie marker

To shop our entire line of motorcycle tie downs, click:

How to Thread an Over Center Buckle Strap

1-3/4" Over Center Buckle
2″ Over Center Buckle

An over center buckle is an excellent tool to use for jobs that required a quick cinch. While less common than ratchet straps and cam buckle straps, an over center buckle is easy to use, and the latch mechanism creates less wear on the strap itself. The design also allows the webbing to create a layer of padding between the buckle and the cargo.

Constructed of a one piece base and lever arm, webbing is wound through the assembly. With the fastener in an open position, the user can feed the excess webbing through the assembly. Once slack is removed, closing the fastener will add tension to the webbing and hold it in place.

Because over the center buckles are slightly more complex to thread than a typical cam buckle, we’ve created a how-to video demonstration:

If you’d like an over center buckle with webbing already threaded, check out these products:

21′ Over Center Tie Down Strap with Double Stud Fitting

21′ Over Center Buck Strap with Double Stud Fitting on Both Ends

21′ Over Center Strap with Flat Snap Hook on Both Ends

 

 

Employee Recommendation: BlackLine Heavy Duty Ratchet Straps

Sales Specialist Britni gives her take on BlackLine, our own line of premium, heavy duty ratchet straps. Also available in winch straps; features include:

  • Thicker edging for durability. Created with a concentration of fabric, not wire or other enhancement.
  • 2″ straps with 13,000 lb. webbing.  Higher than typical 12,000 lbs. webbing.
  • 4″ straps with 24,000 lb. webbing.  The strongest available in the industry.

Shop the full line here: Heavy Duty BlackLine Straps

How to Install L-Track on a Trailer

Aluminum 48" L-trackL-track tie down rails are incredibly versatile. With lengths ranging from 2″ single points to full 96″-length track, you can easily add a few tie down points to a small space on an open utility garden trailer to tie down a mower, or create several tie down anchor points in a full-sized enclosed trailer to secure multiple motorcycles.

In this video, we installed six 48″ rails and two wheel chocks to convert a snowmobile trailer to a dirt bike trailer that can accommodate two motorcycles.

Products used:

Tools required:

  • Cordless drill with 1/4 inch drill bit
  • 10MM and 7/16 inch wrenches
  • Tape measure and Sharpie marker

 

To see our full line of L-track, visit:

 

10 Ways to Store Tie Down Straps

blogggAfter an un-official poll on our US Cargo Control Facebook page, some of our customers replied and sent us messages with great ideas on how to store tie down straps.

First, before storing them away for any period of time, it’s important to make sure the webbing is clean and dry- be sure and check out our How to Inspect, Clean, and Store Tie Down Straps article for more information.

Also keep in mind that even though it’s tempting to just throw straps in a pile or bucket, taking the time to wind up a strap is also an ideal time to inspect the webbing for rips, tears, and abrasions.

Some of the great tie down storage ideas we received:

Plastic zip ties. Traditional zip ties are generally a one-time use, so these are great if you intend to secure and store away your tie downs for awhile. If you use your straps repeatedly, pick up the reusable zip ties that have a release mechanism.

Plastic Stretch Wrap - SW31000
Plastic Stretch Wrap SW31000

Plastic stretch wrap. Popular in the moving industry, stretch wrap is great because it can secure cargo compactly, yet is re-positionable and doesn’t have sticky adhesive to leave residue behind. For tie down straps, simple wind up tightly and roll a few layers of stretch wrap around it to keep it in place.

Cinch Strap - BSC36
Cinch Strap
BSC36

Rubber band. Simple, fast and easy, but these can quickly become brittle and break, especially with extended sun exposure or extreme temperatures, so you may need to replace often. Another variation that will last a bit longer: elastic hair bands.

Cinch strap.  Velcro cinch straps are great for securing a loop of webbing. If you have a trailer with E-track installed, you can loop the strap through an E-track fitting with O-ring to keep straps up and off the floor.

Plastic freezer bags. Gallon-sized plastic bags work great to not only secure the strap in a loop, they’ll keep them dry too. Gallon-sized bags will accommodate 1″ straps. Larger-sized bags with 2-gallon, 3-gallon, and larger sizes are becoming more common and are great for storing straps with wider webbing.

Bungee Ball - BBB6-100PK
Bungee Ball
BBB6-100PK

Bungee balls. These handy ties come in a bulk package of 100 so you’ll have plenty to wrap up your tie down straps, and some left over for other uses:  securing canopies, keeping box lids closed, anchoring yard ornaments, bundling tent poles, etc.

Bungee Cords - BC3836-10PK
Bungee Cords
BC3836-10PK

Tackle box. Pick up one with dividers; they’re great for storing smaller 1″ straps. An old briefcase is another idea for larger straps. The narrow height keeps them rolled and intact.

Bungee cords. Like bungee balls, the uses are endless with bungee. Our bungee cord selection comes in a wide range of sizes, sure to fit around even your largest 4″ winch straps or ratchet straps.

Plastic storage boxes.  These are a great idea if you’ll be keeping them on a shelf in a garage or shed. Plastic storage boxes come in so many sizes, find one that’s small enough to keep the strap wrapped compactly. Be sure to purchase boxes with clear sides so you can easily see what’s inside without having to open the box. Most have a molded lid design that makes them easy to stack, too.

Shock Cord - SHC18COIL
Shock Cord SHC18COIL

Shock cord. Lightweight shock cords makes it easy to make custom length straps, just by adding bungee hooks.

BONUS TIP: If you work with a lot of tie down straps, especially the larger 3″ and 4″ widths, check out our Strap Winder.

How to Inspect, Clean, and Store Tie Down Straps

image of orange tie down strap from uscargocontrol.comWith winter weather pretty much over (we hope!), it’s a good time to clean and inspect your tie down straps for wear and tear.

Whether you use 1″ ratchet straps to tie down a motorcycle in an enclosed trailer, or you’re a flatbed truck driver using 4″ winch straps, it’s important to regularly inspect straps, clean them, and store properly when not in use. Not only will these best practices extend the working life of the strap, they can also be the difference between a safe trip and a disastrous haul.

Inspecting a tie down strap

Besides holes, tears, and knots, check for these sometimes less-obvious indications of wear:

  • Broken stitching in the stitch patterns
  • Weld splatter, or any areas of melting or charring
  • Damage caused from UV rays: color looks bleached or webbing feels stiff
  • Small particles embedded in the webbing
  • Burnt areas caused by acid, alkali, or other chemicals
  • Cracks, pits, or corrosion on ratchets, cam buckles, hooks, and other fittings.
  • Unusual wear patterns of webbing at the point of contact with the fitting
  • Tag: work load limit information must be visible40401-2-x-24-orange-ratchet-strap-w-double-j-hook_4_640

If any of the above are visible, the straps should be removed from service. If in doubt, check The Web Sling and Tie Down Association (WSTDA)  publication Recommended Standard Specification for Synthetic Web Tie Downs. It’s the gold standard for tie down maintenance guidelines.

After a thorough inspection, create a record with dates to keep on file. Write your notes in a notebook, or keep an electronic file on your computer; either way, it’s a good idea to also take photos of straps so you can refer to them if needed during the next inspection.

How often should you inspect tie down straps? The WSTDA suggests an initial inspection before the strap is placed in service; then again each time before the strap is used. Periodic inspections should be based on: how often the straps are used  and the severity of the conditions the strap is used in. You can also use your experience of using tie downs in similar applications to know how often a strap should be inspected.

How to clean tie down straps

Keeping straps clean is one of the best ways to extend their working life. Mix a mild detergent with warm water and scrub with a quality scrub brush to loosen any dirt and debris. Avoid bleach-based cleansers or any with acid additives.

Even though the polyester fabrication of tie down strap webbing limits water absorption, it’s still best practice to hang straps to allow for thorough air drying.

Tie down strap storage

Straps can be hung on walls, stored in plastic bags or fabric bags, etc., but a good rule of thumb is to be sure and keep them in a dry area away from sunlight.

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How to Use an Endless Ratchet Strap

image of endless ratchet strapAn endless ratchet strap is designed to bundle or band items together, so it’s great for use on a pallet, moving dolly, etc.  Sometimes called “endless loop ratchet straps” or just an “endless strap,” they’re available in a variety of widths, lengths, and colors.

Because a ratchet can be tensioned tightly, it’s a good idea to add corner protectors if you’re strapping together loads that may have delicate or crushable edges. Another option to consider for more fragile loads is an endless cam buckle strap since a cam buckle cannot be over-tightened the same way a ratchet strap can.

1.) Feed the strap through the bottom of the pallet, keeping the strap going the same direction as the fork truck tines. This will prevent the strap from being damaged by the tines.

2.) Bring the loose end of the strap over the top of the pallet and feed the webbing onto the mandrel take up spool of the ratchet. Pull the extra webbing through so that the slack is out of the strap. Failure to perform this step will result in too much webbing being spooled onto the take-up spool and will cause it to jam before the strap is fully tightened. In severe cases you will damage the ratchet assembly and/or you will have to cut the webbing off.

3.) Place corner protectors as needed over the edges of the cargo. This is especially useful if you have cardboard boxes or fragile cargo that will cave in or break when the strap is tightened. Corner protectors are also good for protecting the strap from abrasive cargo such as bricks to increase their life expectancy.

4.) Once you’ve removed the extra slack from the strap, you can begin to ratchet it down to your desired tension.

For more information or to purchase products in this video, click on the links below:

 

How to Use a Ratchet Strap

Some of the most common questions we receive from our customers are about the use of a ratchet strap. Along with questions about break strengths, working load limits, and safety guidelines, are those about how to use these versatile tie down straps:  “How to thread a ratchet strap,” “How to release a ratchet strap,” or something similar. If you’ve never used one of these versatile tie down straps, assembling one for the first time can be confusing.

You can check out this video about ratchet straps and cam straps, which shows how to put together an assembly. We’ve also created the handy photo demonstration below for quick and easy reference.

All of our ratchet straps are DOT-approved and are manufactured with labels attached that include break strength and work load limit information. They also meet several requirements, including:

  • Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA)  guidelines
  • Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations
  • Web Sling & Tie Down Association (WSTDA)
  • California Highway Patrol (CHP)
  • North American Cargo Securement

To see our full line of tie downs, visit our Ratchet Straps & Tie Downs page.

 

infographic for how to use a ratchet strap

 

Replacing Tie Down Straps

If the webbing on your ratchet straps, cam straps or winch straps is showing signs of wear and tear, they need to be replaced. According to the Web Sling and Tie Down Association (WSTDA), web tie down straps should no longer be used if tears, holes, snags, cuts or embedded particles are evident that could raise doubt about the tie down’s strength. They should also be replaced if the work load limit (WLL) information is no longer visible on the webbing.

Replacement tie down straps

Replacement strap: fixed end with ratchet and flat hook
Replacement strap

 

Replacement tie down straps are a great choice for because you’ll need to buy only the end that needs replacing.  Several options are available, including wire hooks, chain extensions, and flat hooks. Replacement straps can also be used to easily turn a winch strap into a ratcheting strap. Polyester webbing replacement straps can be purchased in 2″, 3″ and 4″ widths.

 

Polyester cargo webbing

Polyester cargo webbing: 2" width
Polyester cargo webbing

 

If you only need to replace the webbing on your current ratchet straps, cam straps or winch straps, you can purchase polyester cargo webbing by the foot. This way you only buy the lengths that you need. It’s available in a range of colors and in 1″, 2″, 3″, and 4″ widths.

How to Use an Endless Cam Buckle Strap

Like ratchet straps, cam buckle straps are great for securing a load. But the method of tightening with a cam buckle strap makes it less likely that you’ll over-tighten and damage cargo. Cam buckles are tightened by pulling the strap rather than with a ratcheting action, so the strap can be tensioned only as tight as your strength allows.

Cam straps are ideal for securing cargo on a pallet, trailer, or in a truck, but they’re also a great all-purpose strap for use around the home, shop, garage, farm, etc. An endless cam buckle strap is a one-piece design so it’s easy to use and to store.

The strap featured in the video below is a 1″ x 15″ endless cam buckle strap, but custom sizes and widths are available by calling our sales team at 866-444-9990.