Using Tie Downs to Secure Cargo Loads Safely and Legally

During the 2017 CVSA International Roadcheck, improper cargo securement was the cause for 15.7% of vehicles being placed out of service.

Besides the risk of being placed out of service, there are a number of more serious consequences for improper cargo control securement, including citations and fines, damage to the vehicle, damage to the cargo, loss of the load, or even loss of life.

Taking the time to properly secure cargo loads using tie downs is always worth the time and effort. Read on to understand how tie downs should be used to ensure safe and legal cargo securement.

 

understand how to use tie downs

What is a tie down?

According to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), a tie down is a combination of securing devices (webbing, chain, rope, binders, shackles, D-rings, webbing ratchet, etc.) which forms an assembly that:

  1. Attaches cargo to, or restrains cargo on a vehicle.
  2. Is attached to an anchor point(s).

 

So, while we generally think of tie downs as just these:

how to safely use tie down straps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The word tie down by itself (without “straps”) can technically mean many things.

 

Working load limit for tie downs

The working load limit (WLL) for a tie down is the lowest WLL of any of its parts or the WLL of the anchor points it is attached to, whichever is less. Every device contributes to the WLL of the securement system.

using tie downs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Always use tie downs that are rated and clearly marked by their manufacturer. This not only gives you, the driver, peace of mind, it also makes it easy for shippers and inspectors to verify that you are using the proper equipment for the job.

 

using tie downs built with quality

 

How tie downs can be used to secure cargo

Tie downs are only safe and effective if they are properly secured to both the cargo and the vehicle. Take the time to ensure logical securement of your cargo to your vehicle.

There are two main ways tie downs can be used:

  1. Attached to the cargo.
    a. Tie downs can be attached to the vehicle and then attached to the cargo.
    b. Or, tie downs can be attached to the vehicle, passed through or around the cargo, and then attached to the vehicle again.

how to use tie downs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Passed over the cargo.
    a. Tie downs may also be attached to the vehicle, passed over the cargo, and then attached to the vehicle again.

how to use tie downs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inspecting for proper cargo securement

Remember to periodically inspect your cargo during transit. It may seem like something that is always taking up your precious time, but just one loose strap can prove to be costly or even deadly.

Adjust cargo and load securement devices as necessary to ensure that cargo cannot shift or fall from the vehicle.

 

When is it time to get new tie-downs?

There are a few obvious signs that tell you it’s time to get new tie downs.

If your cargo control equipment shows any of the following, it’s time to invest in new tie downs.

  • knots or obvious damage
  • distress
  • weakened parts
  • weakened sections

time to get new tie downs

 

 

 

Remember, all components of a tie down must be in proper working order. Keep an eye on the condition of your tie downs to avoid inspection penalties or loss of load.

 

Time for new tie down equipment? Check out US Cargo Control for a huge selection of quality tie down equipment that is clearly rated and built to last.

 

Secure Ratchet Straps Right with the Good-N-Tight®

Get 3x the leverage with Good-N-Tight®

If you or someone you know is looking for a smarter and safer way to secure ratchet straps, the Good-N-Tight® may be just what you need.

This mechanical ratcheting aid makes proper tensioning of 2″, 3″, and 4″ ratchet straps much easier than doing it by hand. With 3x the leverage, the Good-N-Tight® gives just about anybody the ability to tightly secure cargo loads.

Good-N-Safe with the Good-N-Tight®

The Good-N-Tight®  also makes ratchet strap tightening safer. In fact, one chiropractor recommends it as a tool to prevent injuries. The Good-N-Tight® is thought to reduce the stress put on your body (back, shoulders, and elbows) when tightening portable ratchet straps. Unlike winch bars, the Good-N-Tight®  will not slip out and cause injury.

Not only is it safer for your body, it also ensures your cargo loads are fully secure. This leads to safer roadways for everyone.

Even better, the Good-N-Tight® is tax deductible because it’s considered a safety item!

Made of high-strength polycarbonate plastic, the Good-N-Tight®  weighs just 1.5 pounds. But make no mistake, this product is made in the USA and designed to last.

The Many Uses of the Good-N-Tight®

Besides giving you a mechanical advantage when securing ratchet straps, there are numerous other uses of the Good-N-Tight®  that make it a great investment.

1. Check your tire pressure – Tap your tires with the Good-N-Tight®  to quickly ensure they aren’t low on air. Properly inflated tires will make a loud and sharp thud, while poorly inflated tires make a dull thud.

2. Use it as a hammer – You won’t be able to chisel concrete with it, but if you need to drive a nail or tap something flush in a pinch the Good-N-Tight®  is built solid enough to handle it.

3. Personal protection – Hopefully you won’t ever need it for this but, much like a baseball bat, the Good-N-Tight® can serve as a self-defense tool if needed.

How to Care for Ratchet Straps

Ratchet Straps and Tie Downs
US Cargo Control Ratchet Strap

Ratchet straps are one of the best ways to tie down and secure loads during transport. They’re relatively easy to use and care for, and US Cargo Control can customize them to your specific needs. Knowing how to care for your ratchet straps properly can extend their life and be more economical for you.

Our strong, yet lightweight, polyester straps are ideal for a variety of applications. The fabrication allows for very little stretch, and resists abrasions, as well as damage from UV rays and most common chemicals.

Their minimal absorption of water prevents shrinkage, mold, mildew, and rotting, even after being exposed to the elements over time. These qualities also make them a long-lasting and economical choice, especially for outdoor uses.

Ratchet Strap Maintenance and Storage

When straps are not in use, there are recommended ways to maintain and store them.

First, before storing them for any length of time, it’s important to make sure the webbing is clean and dry. To wash your straps after usage, before storage, simply hose them down with water and let them dry before storing.

If you find that your straps are not coming clean with this method, you can mix a mild detergent with warm water and scrub with a quality scrub brush to loosen any dirt and debris. Avoid bleach-based cleansers or any with acid additives.

Also, keep in mind that although it’s tempting to toss straps in a pile after usage, taking the time to wind up a strap is also an ideal time to inspect the webbing for rips, tears and abrasions. If you work with a lot of tie down straps, especially the 2”, 3″ and 4″ widths, check out our Strap Winder.

You preferably want to store ratcheting straps in a dry place away from sunlight. The actual steel ratcheting mechanisms build up corrosion over time if you leave them exposed to moisture–then they just become more difficult to use.

Items to Help Store Your Ratchet Straps

Bungee balls. These handy ties come in a bulk package of 100 so you’ll have plenty to wrap up your tie down straps, and some left over for other uses: securing canopies, keeping box lids closed, anchoring yard ornaments, bundling tent poles, etc.

Bungee cords. Like bungee balls, the uses are endless with bungee. Our bungee cord selection comes in a wide range of sizes, sure to fit around even your largest 4″ winch straps or ratchet straps.

Cinch strap. Velcro cinch straps are great for securing loose webbing. If you have a trailer with E-track installed, you can loop the strap through an E-track fitting with O-ring to keep straps up and off the floor.

If you have any questions about all things ratchet straps, give us a call at 866-444-9990.

Auto Recovery Straps vs. Tow Straps

We get a lot of questions about which straps to use when hauling and towing a vehicle versus the best straps for recovering cars from ditches or other situations. There is a difference between recovery straps and tow straps, and each type has its benefits.

Recovery Straps, Snatch Straps, Tow Straps
Situational usage of recovery straps.

Recovery Straps

Recovery straps are best used to “recover” a stuck vehicle. Say your car or off-road recreational vehicle gets stuck in the mud or a ditch and you’re not going anywhere no matter what you try. If you don’t want to call a tow truck, you can use another vehicle and recovery straps to do the job.

Recovery straps are made of a nylon fabrication that stretches when necessary. These straps, also called “snatch straps” since they can snatch a vehicle out of a sticky situation, have loops on each end.

3x20 strap with looped ends and Cordura eyes
Recovery straps have loops on both ends.

To use a recovery strap you attach the strap to the back of the vehicle performing the recovery at an appropriate frame point, and also to the front of the vehicle being recovered. Thread the strap through the eye of the other end to choke the frame. Make sure the strap is not rubbing against any sharp edges. If you need hardware to secure the strap, anchor shackles are great for recovery vehicles. As the first vehicle begins to move forward, the strap stretches and pulls the stuck vehicle free.

Recovery straps are safer for this type of usage than chain, they’re easier to use and they are not nearly as heavy. Making sure your recovery strap is in good shape is very important before using. Any straps that are frayed or warn increases the likelihood of breakage during a recovery. Straps with faded color are also more apt to break during usage. Store straps out of sunlight and away from excessive heat. Straps perform well in cold temps as well as heat, but should not be used in temperatures in excess of 194 degrees Fahrenheit. To clean your strap, spray with water and do not use chemicals.

Tow Straps

The biggest difference between a tow strap and a recovery strap is the stretchiness of the fabric. A tow strap is made of less-stretchy polyester, and is intended for the towing of a freely-moving vehicle behind another vehicle. Typically, tow straps have metal hooks on each end. Tow straps should not be used in the recovery of stuck vehicles simply because they are less stretchy and can more easily break under the pressure a recovery entails. Traditional tow straps and chains are similar in their towing applications.

Strap Safety

No matter which type of strap you’re using, there are standard safety protocols. Because straps can snap, or break, and launch through the air at a high rate of speed, it’s a good idea to keep any bystanders at least the distance of the length of the strap away from the application.

Choosing the right size strap is also very important. US Cargo Control straps come in widths from 2” to 12” with break strengths from 20,000 lbs. to 400,000+ lbs., and can be made to any custom length since we manufacture them in-house. We can also layer the strap from 1- to 4-ply designs, so you can get the width you want with the strength you need. More plies allow for a narrower strap with greater break strength than single ply.

Our straps are designed with CORDURA® at the eyes of the strap for better resistance to wear and tear. It’s important to note that US Cargo Control straps are manufactured with high-quality, heavy-duty nylon designed for both recovery and towing uses.

If you have any questions about what strap is best for your application, or if you need a custom strap please call us at 866-444-9990 and we’ll be happy to help you get you what you want, when you need it.

New Products: Wheel Nets & Car Tie Downs

Our selection of wheel nets and car tie downs continues to expand.

We’ve launched more than 20 new products, including value-priced 4-packs of wheel nets and 2-packs of tow dolly straps.

Also, the category page design itself has been revamped, so you can more easily find a strap to fit your needs. Shop using dedicated pages for Wheel Nets, Tow Dolly Straps, Wheel Straps, Axle Straps & Auto Tie Downs, and Tie Down Hardware. The Wheel Nets subcategory allows you to shop by wheel/tire size or by specific application.

Consider these factors when choosing a tie down:

  • Type of trailer being used and available anchor points. Do you plan to install additional attachment points?
  • Type of vehicle(s) being hauled.
  • Tie down restrictions, such as for racecars, custom models, and other low-clearance vehicles.
  • Vehicle weight. The combined working load limit of each tie down should be equal to or greater than the vehicle’s weight.

New ideas are constantly being explored and tested, so check back often! Among the changes and additions rolled out so far:

Stronger working load limit

Upgraded stitch patterns for two of our tow dolly basket straps – available with flat hooks or twisted snap hooks – bring the working load limit to 3,333 lbs. instead of 2,000 lbs. This allows them to be used on vehicles that exceed 4,000 lbs.

Larger tow dolly basket straps

Extra-large tow dolly strap

Extra-large tow dolly basket straps are now an option to fit most wheels larger than 17”.

These come with your choice of end fittings: two twisted snap hooks or two flat hooks.

The loose tail of the wheel bonnet can be paired with a 2″ ratchet or lashing hook to secure it to a trailer.

Our smaller versions accommodate most 14” to 17” tires.

Adjustable wheel nets with D-rings

Adjustable tow dolly strap with 4” top strap

D-rings have replaced cambuckles to increase the working load limit on adjustable models.

Several styles featuring height adjustability have joined our lineup. Two slots on both sides of the top strap let you position the horizontal webbing higher or lower when securing different vehicle tire sizes. Simply insert the horizontal strap through the bottom loop for large tires, or jump up a level for a snug fit on smaller wheels. Tighten the front-to-back strap around the wheel with the integrated D-ring, and the loose tail feeds into a trailer-mounted winch or ratchet.

Those with a 2” top strap are ideal for most wheels 14” to 17”, while a 4” top strap provides stability around wheels with diameters of 17” or larger.

Replacement straps for professional auto hauling

2″ x 10′ replacement wheel strap

We now offer replacement straps designed for double-deck car carriers.

These assemblies are similar to our existing wheel straps but do not come with a ratchet. Instead, the loose end feeds into trailer-mounted winches.

For easy connection to the trailer deck, choose two swivel J-hooks or two double-J wire hooks.

Three adjustable, cleated rubber blocks grab a tire’s treads for extra securement.

As always, call us at 866-348-3473 for help determining the right style of tie down for your application. We’re here to get you what you want, when you need it.

5 Tips for Hunting with Your Portable Tree Stand

Whether hunting with a bow or firearm, utilizing a portable tree stand is a popular way to gain an elevated view of approaching game and ensure your scent is not easily detected down below. However, tree stands can result in serious injury without preparation, the appropriate tree stand accessories and proper installation procedures. Add the essential hunting accessories and you’re ready for a good hunt.

Climbing tree stands allow for superior mobility while searching for the optimal spot to blend in and wait. No matter what portable tree stand you choose – even if you make your own – there are safety considerations to remember and best practices to follow. Use these tips the next time you venture out:

  1. Inspect your gear. Before you even leave home, look over all of your equipment and hunting accessories. Check your safety harness and straps for fray or other defects. Make sure the pieces of your stand are in working order. Double check your supply list so you don’t forget to pack any essential tools.
  2. Find the right tree. Locating an ideal tree may take a while unless you’ve previously scouted the area. Trees have to be sturdy enough to support both you and the platform. Live, healthy trees with a sizeable circumference are the goal. Tall and sturdy with no lower branches or loose bark are other preferred features. Some stand manufacturers set restrictions or size specifications. Confirm the area you’re in allows the type of system and accessories you are using. Screw-in styles or steps are frequently not permitted in order to protect trees from permanent damage.
  3. Lock your safety harness to the trunk. Getting your stand set up and safely secured can take a little while. Once you have the top and bottom parts of the stand ready to make the climb, tether your body harness to the trunk with a moveable ratchet strap secured just above the top of the stand. This securement will serve as backup if the stand falls. In addition, a safety strap from your harness to the tree takes some weight and pressure off the stand itself.
  4. Don’t rush the climb. Step onto the bottom part of your stand, which should already be attached to the tree. Once in the stand, you should be able to reposition the tree strap about 12” up the tree and tighten it back onto the tree. Grab the top part of your stand and move it upward, then use your feet to grab the bottom portion of the stand and lift that up, as well. Repeat this process a number of times until you feel you have a good overview of your area that’s out of a target’s line of sight, yet within your desired shooting distance. Descend the tree by simply reversing these instructions. Never carry your firearm or bow while climbing. Keep these items on the ground, perhaps in a bag, tethered to the top of the tree stand with a strap or a rope that you can pull up to you once you’ve secured your tree stand to where you plan to perch during the hunt.
  5. Check the local weather forecast. Know what conditions to expect. Temperature and precipitation affect how readily you can reach your tree stand, and influence the ability to see, hear and track your prey. Also, dress appropriately. Especially in high altitudes, a warm day can turn into a freezing cold night. If necessary, carry a blanket to bunker down with.

Keep these safety tips in mind to help guarantee a successful and injury-free harvest season. US Cargo Control carries a variety of hunting accessories such as camo blankets and camo safety straps with choices of hooks and ratchets for your unique needs. Call us anytime with questions: 888-719-4020.

Cargo Webbing: What’s the Difference Between Nylon and Polyester?

Cargo webbing is used for a variety of tie downs, cargo nets, seat belts, etc., but there’s a difference in the fabrication of the webbing. Polyester webbing and nylon webbing are the two major categories, along with another polyester fabric webbing that’s known in the industry as seatbelt webbing. While all three may seem similar, some differences will make one better than another for certain applications.

 Nylon webbing

Nylon Cargo Webbing
Nylon Webbing

 

Nylon webbing offers a good combination of both stretch and strength. It has the ability to stretch about 5% to 7% at rated capacity and approximately 30% at break strength. This snap-back quality makes nylon cargo webbing a great choice for recovery straps because of its ability to recover stuck vehicles.

Nylon tie downs should not be used in temperatures above 194 degrees F (90 degrees C) or below -40 degrees F (-40 degrees C). It should also not come in contact with objects above or below those temperatures, including anchor points, the cargo being secured, or a vehicle.

Polyester webbing

polyester cargo webbing
Polyester Webbing

 

Like nylon webbing, polyester webbing is strong and durable, but it lacks the ability to stretch the same way nylon does. This makes it ideal for tie-down applications where cargo must stay secure and not be allowed to bounce: ratchet straps, motorcycle tie downs, cargo nets, etc. Polyester cargo webbing is also versatile as you can add your own tie-down hardware to create your own custom tie-down straps.

Like nylon, polyester webbing should not be used in temperatures above 194 degrees F (90 degrees C) or below -40 degrees F (-40 degrees C), or come in contact with objects (anchor points, cargo being secured, or vehicle) above or below those temperatures.

Seatbelt webbing

Polyester Seat Belt  Cargo Webbing
Polyester Seat Belt Webbing

 

Seatbelt webbing is also a polyester webbing so it offers the same benefits of strength and little stretch. While still a tough, high-quality webbing, it is a less expensive option because it’s offered in just one size and three color options. Seat belt webbing also has a thinner profile than typical polyester cargo web, so it’s great for lighter duty applications such as bag handles, life jacket straps, etc.

When using seatbelt webbing for any application, you should also follow the maximum and minimum temperatures guidelines outlined above for polyester webbing.

Sizes and strengths of cargo webbing

Webbing ranges in widths from 1” to 12” and various lengths. It’s important to keep in mind that a longer strap will not increase the break strength ability, but a wider width will. Each strap width should include tensile strength information, which is the maximum amount of stress a strap will take before failing or breaking. The work load limit will vary by the use or application.

Kits Make Motorcycle Tie Downs Easy

US Cargo Control offers many different types of motorcycle tie down systems. Kits are available to make selecting and installing a custom securement solution simple. The kits contain all of the pieces you’ll need to assemble a system that will allow you to transport your motorcycle safely. 3460-motorcycle-combo-strap-kit_4_640

Kits vary in complexity ranging from basic tie downs wit L-track rails and fittings to a more robust tie down system that will secure two motorcycles to an 8 ft. trailerAnchor point tie down kits are handy for those looking to install a securement system in a smaller space, like the back of a pickup truck. Anchor points can be installed really anywhere on the truck, allowing you to put them exactly where you need them.

Some kits include L-track rails. US Cargo Control L-track comes in a variety of colors that can be coordinated to match your truck, trailer or brand of motorcycle. Options include blue (Yamaha), green (Kawasaki), orange (Harley Davidson) and red (Honda). The olive green also matches military and camouflage products. Standard black and classic aluminum are also available. The L-track product is finished with a powder coat that amps up the color and protects the underlying aluminum from scratches.

8' Motorcycle Tie Down System with Wheel Chock
8′ Motorcycle Tie Down System with Wheel Chock

Strap kits are sold as a supplemental option to complete some tie down system offerings. Options including a combo strap kit and a 4-pack of motorcycle ratchet straps. Motorcycle straps feature a 1” rugged, polyester webbing that won’t stretch, mold or mildew.

US Cargo Control kits can be customized. If you do not see a kit that fits your specific needs or would like help selecting a kit call  800-969-6543. A sales specialists will be happy to work with you and help you find exactly what you need.

 

 

 

US Cargo Control Adds Kayak Straps

US Cargo Control is now offering kayak, canoe and boat tie-down equipment as the busy water sport season gets underway. These straps are specially designed to withstand the wear and tear of recreational water sports.

1" x 2' Endless Cam Strap w/ Wear Pad
1″ x 2′ Endless Cam Strap w/ Wear Pad

The straps are 1’’ wide and come in a variety of lengths. They are made with water resistant polyester meaning they will not mold, mildew or rot. Polyester can also withstand the sun’s UV rays and will stretch minimally.

USCC watersport straps feature a wear pad on the buckle as well as vinyl on all hooks to protect the boat from any cosmetic damage from metal pieces. US Cargo Control Category Manager Kerry Trenkamp brought on the new line of tie downs. She says her team prioritized protection when searching for the right equipment to add to the brand.

“The last thing we want our customers to worry about is damage,” Trenkamp said. “We understand the importance of keeping the watercraft secure and scratch-free.”

Many of the water recreation straps offered by US Cargo Control are outfitted with a cam buckle. People can over-tighten gear like a kayak or canoe with a traditional ratchet strap. That risk is limited with a cam buckle.

Retractable ratchet straps are also available as transom tie downs. They are designed to keep extra material from tangling and flapping during transport.

whitewater-park-gift-certificate2

The release of the new product line comes as Iowa’s newest and largest white-water course celebrates its grand opening. Manchester White Water Park in Manchester, Iowa will host its Let It Flow Riverfest June 19-21. US Cargo Control donated four, $25 gift cards and a gift basket containing US Cargo Control watersport straps to be given away during the event.

“We wanted to celebrate with area water sport enthusiasts and let them know these new products are available to keep their gear safe as they travel this summer,” Trenkamp said.

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Manchester White Water Park (Courtesy: Manchester White Water Park Facebook Page).
Manchester White Water Park (Courtesy: Manchester White Water Park Facebook Page).

 

What’s the difference between L-Track and E Track?

There are some big differences between L-track and E track for those looking to outfit their truck or trailer with a new tie-down system.

8 Piece 4' L Track Tie Down System- Blue
8 Piece 4′ L Track Tie Down System- Blue

L-Track is made from lightweight, heavy-duty aluminum providing a sleek look. While it will work in any vehicle or trailer it is ideal for a pick-up truck. L-Track has a much lower profile compared to E Track. The width of the track matches nearly perfect to the inside of the bed rails and can be installed flawlessly inside the ribs of the truck bed as well. US Cargo Control offers 2” anchor plates with 6”, 12”, 24”, 48”, 72” and 96” track lengths that are all available in a variety of colors that can be coordinated to match the truck.

E Track made in a horizontal style.
E Track made in a horizontal style.

 

E Track is much more industrial. It is commonly installed inside trailers, cargo vans, moving vans and enclosed semi-trailers. It is the industry standard for cargo control. These rails are heavy and powerful made from high strength 12 GA steel. US Cargo Control offers E Track in 2′, 5′, 8′ and 10′ sections and can come painted or galvanized.

US Cargo Control also offers wide selection of accessories, straps and fittings for L-Track and straps and tie-downs designed for E Track.

When deciding between the two systems consider your purpose and what you’re trying to secure. L-Track is light, sleek and can be coordinated with the paint on your truck or trailer. E Track is stronger, heavier and much more industrial. Both will work inside of a trailer — just consider what you were trying to do. If you need more information or help deciding give one of our product experts a call today at US Cargo Control 855-206-6269.

 

 

How to Get Your Trailer Motorcycle Ready

US Cargo Control offers a variety of tie-down systems so you can haul just about anything. If you’re planning to spend your summer on the road with your motorcycle we have a system that will work great for you.

TrackStar L-track Motorcycle Chock
TrackStar L-track Motorcycle Chock

Our TrackStar L-track Motorcycle Chock includes everything you’ll need to install the chock on a trailer or truck bed. The bundle includes a wheel chock, 8” long L-track, flathead phillips screws, nylock nuts and flat fender washers. To install the track, line-up the two nuts on the base plate with two holes on the track and push down. This will make the plunger mechanism pop-up. Then, slide it forward until the plunger sinks and locks the wheel chock in place. To remove, pull the plunger up and slide back until the wheel chock releases from the track. Keep in mind, standard L-track does not work with the TrackStar motorcycle wheel chocks. You will need to use USCC Extra 8” L-Track Kit if you want the ability to move the wheel chock to a different location on the trailer. Be sure to shop our entire line of motorcycle straps to find the right tie-down accessories for your bike. We offer a variety of colored straps to coordinate with your motorcycle.

Watch the video below to learn how to install the L-track and chocks onto a trailer.

 

 

What are the Different Types of L-Track Fittings?

L-track is a very versatile option to quickly create custom cargo-control systems. L-track is made of a simple, aluminum rail and is paired with special fittings and straps used to keep cargo snug and secure in pickups, cargo vans and trailers.

L-track featuring a single stud fitting O ring.
L-track featuring a single stud fitting O ring.

People use L-track because it’s easy to make their own, especially with its plethora of accessory options.

US Cargo Control offers two types of L-track fittings: single stud and double stud. Each type is placed in a grove along the track creating a secure, adjustable tie-down point. Various types of straps and hooks are compatible with both types of fittings. The difference between single stud and double stud fittings is in the name. Simply put, single stud L-track fittings fit into one slot, where double stud L-track fittings fit into two slots, making the connection point stronger with a higher break strength.

445-double-stud-fitting_4_640
L-track featuring a double stud fitting and strap.

Consider the type of ending you want on the fitting. US Cargo Control offers many different types including single stud fittings with an O ring and D ring plus a double stud with an O ring, D ring, pear link, delta link and others. USCC also offers various ratchet straps equipped with e-track fittings to keep all the pieces together.

US Cargo Control provides many options so you can make the best custom system for whatever you are hauling. If you don’t see exactly what you need, give one of the USCC sales specialists a call at 855-206-6269. They’ll work with you to track down what you need.