3 Factors to Consider When Choosing Lifting Slings

As objects are being lifted, the lifting sling could fail and lead to catastrophes. Read 3 factors to consider when choosing lifting slings.

One of the biggest causes of injuries and fatalities in the lifting and rigging industry is accidents caused by falls. As heavy objects are being lifted, sometimes the lifting sling can fail and lead to potential catastrophes. To prevent these situations, it is critical that you must use the correct types of lifting slings for your lifting jobs. Read 3 factors you should consider when choosing the right lifting sling, and learn the different types of slings we carry at US Cargo Control.

1. Know The Weight, Strength, and Delicacy of the Load

It’s important to know the weight and strength of the load that you intend to lift, as well as the WLL (Working Load Limit) of the sling. When you have an understanding of the object’s weight and strength, make sure you provide support from all directions. Providing support from the sides will prevent the object from falling, preventing injuries and risk to the workers on site.

The other thing that you should note is the fragility of the load you are lifting. The goal is to not only lift an object but protect the object from getting damaged in the lifting process. For lifting heavy objects or objects made of hard metals, we recommend using chain slings to perform the job.

Saw random numbers on your load-bearing equipment and didn’t know what they meant? Read what Working Load Limit, Breaking Strength, and Safety Factor mean.

2. Identify the Center of Gravity of the Load, and the Sling’s Flexibility

When you’re looking at the object you will be lifting, observe the object’s shape and design to tell you where the center of gravity is. You do not want to miss the center of the load before you begin to lift because you can potentially thrust the load and cause damage. If you’re lifting irregularly-shaped loads, consider using nylon slings as these have great flexibility and strength.

3. Do the Objects have Sharp Edges?

You’re going to lift objects that have sharp edges. Although nylon slings work best for loads needed for flexibility, the fabric will not perform well because it will be fighting against sharp edges. They will cause ripping to the sling, and this will likely result in the object falling and getting damaged.

If you’re having to lift objects with sharp edges, we recommend using chain slings or wire rope slings. We also carry corner protectors that can cover the edges of the object and protect your slings and chains.

What Are the Different Types of Slings?

Now that you know the three critical factors to consider when choosing a sling, you need to learn the many different types of slings there are. This will help you identify which sling is worth the investment for your lifting situations.

Nylon Slings

US Cargo Control nylon lifting sling

Known as synthetic web slings or nylon web slings, our nylon lifting straps perform well for lifting breakable, delicate objects. Its heavy-duty synthetic material has great stretch and flexibility that help the slings mold to the shape of the load. Not only that, the nylon lifting sling’s material is treated to improve abrasion resistance and reduce wear, even in the most rigorous lifting applications.

They are lightweight, easy to handle, and offer a wider body with more stretch than a polyester sling. Its attributes make synthetic slings a popular choice for rigging purposes and are essential to have around, but they should not be used in extreme or rugged conditions. Nylon rigging straps will wear down more quickly than other types of slings if you go against its limits!

Chain Slings

If you’re depending on a sling that requires extra strength and durability, the chain sling is your best choice. The chain lifting sling is the strongest and most durable type of sling and is highly popular to use for heavy lifting operations. They will perform better than polyester round slings or nylon slings because they’re more durable, tolerant to hot temperatures, and cut-resistant. When we say chain slings are tolerant to hot temperatures, this means they are useful for lifts in extremely hot temperatures or to secure extremely hot objects.

We offer three trusted brands of lifting chain slings, Crosby, KWB, and Pewag. We offer chain slings from these brands because we want you to have the highest-quality slings that will perform the lifting job successfully. We sell these in two types, standard and adjustable, and we also offer custom options if needed.

We recently added a full line of Grade 120 chain and components that are now available at US Cargo Control. Read more about Grade 120 and its benefits.

Polyester Round Slings

Polyester slings can be confused with nylon slings due to their material that is also made of a web-like fabric. The difference is that while nylon slings stretch easily, polyester round slings have a little stretch to them. These are useful to have for lifting operations where strength is needed, but not a lot of stretch needed.

Manufactured in the USA from a continuous loop of polyester yarn that creates exceptional strength, the round slings are versatile, pliable, convenient, and cost-effective. Because of their many benefits, you can use these in vertical, choker, or basket hitches, making them effective to lift a wide variety of cargo!

Curious about the differences between nylon slings and polyester slings? Read Polyester Slings vs Nylon Slings: Which Web Sling Type is Better?

Wire Rope Slings

US Cargo Control wire slings

Known as steel cable or wire sling, these are more durable than synthetic slings and more cost-effective than chain slings. Wire rope slings are an excellent choice not only for lifting, but also for hoisting, towing, or anchoring loads. Its fabrication offers abrasion-resistance and heat-resistance, as they are made by weaving individual strands or wire around a core.

Wire rope slings are favorable by riggers as they can come in a wide variety of materials, diameters, and configurations. Each steel wire rope configuration will offer different benefits and are suited to certain applications. For example, a smaller number of large outer wires offers better wear and corrosion resistance, while a larger number will provide better flexibility and fatigue-resistance.

If you would like to learn more about wire rope configuration, see our category on wire rope.

Tackle the Toughest Lifting Jobs with High-Quality Rigging Hardware

We know the importance of quality when it comes to rigging supplies. We carry a variety of rigging hardware, as well as lifting beams and spreader bars that are designed to lift heavy loads safely and efficiently.

We also do custom orders! Need a custom lifting sling? We can do that! We can customize a lifting sling to meet your specific needs.

Contact our sales team today at 866-444-9990. Our team of product experts is here to answer any questions about rigging hardware, lifting slings, and more.

Grade 120 Chain and Components at US Cargo Control

We’ve added a wide selection of the strongest and toughest chain grade components to our inventory.

A full line of Grade 120 chain and chain sling components are now available through US Cargo Control.

Grade 120 is a high-strength, ultra-premium quality alloy steel with the highest working load limits in the industry. Now it’s easier than ever to get the G120 products you need to tackle the toughest overhead lifting and transportation jobs.

We’ve added a wide selection of the strongest and toughest chain grade components to our stock. And with a large inventory of bulk g120 chain, fittings, chain and binder kits, and more, you can count on US Cargo Control for all of your Grade 120 transport and rigging and lifting needs!

4 Benefits of Grade 120 Components

Length of blue grade 120 chain showcasing the square-link design.

1. It’s the Strongest Chain in the Industry

Grade 120 chain and components are 50% stronger than Grade 80 and 20% stronger than Grade 100 products. That added strength means you can select a smaller chain size for the job that’s lighter in weight and easier to handle – all without sacrificing working load limits.

2. It’s Extremely Durable

G120 chain features a revolutionary square link design that offers superior fatigue and bending resistance, making it an excellent choice for a wide variety of lifting applications. The patented square profile also offers increased contact between the surfaces on the links, resulting in a better grip than a traditional round link-style chain. A blue powder-coated finish adds corrosion protection.

3. It’s Easy to Identify

All Grade 120 Chain and Components feature a light-blue powder coating for quick and easy identification. You will also find either “120” or “12” markings on the chain and components as additional identification as Grade 120 alloy.

4. It’s Made by Pewag

Our Grade 120 chain and components are made by Pewag, an industry leader in quality chain products. With a history dating back over 500 years, Pewag is an established and trusted manufacturer in the transportation and lifting industries.

Grade 120 Chain Slings

Chain slings manufactured with grade 120 chains offer the highest strength available on the market. They are excellent for heavy-duty lifting applications.

There are two main types of lifting slings: standard and adjustable. Both options allow the user to customize the sling to suit their specific lifting application. Choose from several options including the number of legs, length of the chain, and type of end fitting.

Blue Grade 120 standard chain sling with a sling hook and oblong link at opposing ends of the length of chain.

Standard Chain Sling

Features a fixed-length of Grade 120 Chain and available in a variety of length and end fitting combinations

Blue adjustable single-leg chain sling with a sling hook and oblong link at opposing ends of the length of chain.

Adjustable Chain Sling

Can be designed with the same leg configurations as standard slings, but an additional fitting allows the user to adjust the length of the chain.

Grade 120 Fittings

We stock a wide selection of G120 end fittings. Like all Grade 120 components, end-fittings all feature the distinctive blue powder-coat finish for superior corrosion protection and easy identification. Some of the most common options include:

Blue Grade 120 oblong master link ring.

Oblong Master Links are used at the top of chain slings.

Blue Grade 120 grab hook.

Eye Grab Hooks are designed for optimal interaction between chain and hook, making them excellent for a variety of lifting applications.

Blue Grade 120 self-locking hook.

Self-Locking Hooks feature a larger opening than typical eye sling hooks and automatically close and lock under load.

Blue Grade 120 sling hook with silver galvanized safety latch.

A Sling Hook has a forged and galvanized safety latch for a secure connection in a variety of lifting applications.

Tackle The Toughest Lifting Jobs With Grade 120

We recommend heavy-duty Grade 120 Chain for the toughest jobs. Whether you are in the trucking and transportation or lifting and rigging industries, the high-strength and superior quality of G120 alloy steel can stand up to even the most demanding applications.

If you’re looking for more information on chain slings, check out our main chain slings page on our website or our lifting slings category on our blog.


Are you ready to get your hands on some Grade 120 products? Contact our sales team today at 800-404-7068. Our team of product experts is here to answer any questions about rigging chain, lifting slings, and more.


We also do custom orders! Need a custom lifting sling? We can do that! Because we assemble all of our Grade 120 chain slings in-house, we can customize a lifting sling to meet your specific needs.

National Farmer’s Day

National Manufacturing Day is a day to celebrate farmers across the nation for all their hard work to provide food for everybody.

Without Farmers and Agriculture, there would be no food in grocery stores or on our tables.

National Farmer’s Day was on October 12th. Originally known as Old Farmer’s Day, it is a day to pay tribute to the men, women, and families who put food in our grocery stores and onto our tables every day.

Since the beginning of agriculture, the impact of farmers hasn’t just been their integrity and their continued ability to provide our nation with the food we eat. They contribute to our economy in several ways. Farmers supply a stream of jobs, keep small and large communities together, and provide numerous products and needs that keep other businesses running. Other products and industries that are relied on by agriculture include restaurants, transportation, apparel, railroads, and more.

Source: Leverage

National Farmer’s Day was set on October 12th because it is after the traditional harvest time of many crops. This way, farmers would be able to join in on the festivities because they are done with the harvesting.

One of the things US Cargo Control is able to help farmers with is providing them with the right tools for their farm equipment. In fact, we recently hosted an Iowa Corn Growers event at US Cargo Control headquarters. The event included important training and discussion on how to safely extract a vehicle with the proper equipment, as well as giving additional information on the products we carry and how they help ensure safety when transferring cargo both on and off public roadways.

USCC team member, Tim Sanders, talking to the crowd of Iowa Corn Grower Members.

Some of the equipment discussed in this lecture included shackles, recovery straps, and tow straps. We carry galvanized shackles and stainless steel shackles, but they have different applications. Stainless steel shackles are used for marine applications, while galvanized shackles are more for industrial applications.

Along with shackles, it is important to know which strap to use. Recovery straps are the better choice to use to extract a stuck vehicle because of the nylon fabrication. Tow straps are not recommended for extracting stuck vehicles but are better for moving a free-moving vehicle behind your vehicle.

To learn more about how to use these products, read about the types of shackles we carry as well as the difference between recovery straps and tow straps.

To all the farmers who work hard every day, thank you for all that you do. Being headquarted in Central Iowa, we understand how important agriculture is and your presence is much appreciated!

Source: Leverage

If you have any questions, give our team of experts a call at 800-404-7068.

How to Tell When It’s Time for New Rigging Gear

Whether you’re inspecting wire rope, chain slings, synthetic web slings, round slings, or any type of rigging hardware, here are the warning signs of potential rigging equipment failure.

rigging gear inspection checklist

Stay safe and compliant with these rigging gear inspection tips.

The best way to tell if it’s time to upgrade your rigging and lifting gear starts with regular inspections, ideally before and after each use. When you’re trying to get a job done, it’s easy to fall out of the habit of inspecting your gear. But, compared to the alternatives options of either failing an official inspection or having your gear fail while in use, regular rigging gear inspection is well worth it.

So, whether you’re using wire rope, chain slings, synthetic web slings, round slings, or any type of rigging hardware, here are the warning signs to look for when inspecting your rigging gear.

Wire Rope Inspection

inspection checklist for wire rope

Wire rope is often combined with wire rope clips and thimbles and also used in wire rope slings that are great for a variety of lifts. It’s also commonly used on specialty vehicles, like tow trucks, as a winch line. Between load stress, environmental conditions, and abrasion, there are many factors that can shorten the life of wire rope.

Regularly inspect your wire rope and discard it if any of the following is evident:

  • Excessive broken wire
  • Distortion or kinking
  • Severe corrosion
  • Shiny worn spots on the outside of the rope
  • A one-third reduction in the outer wire diameter
  • Damaged or displaced hooks, link, rings, or other end fittings

Chain Sling Inspection

inspection checklist for chain slings

Yes, even the strongest chain slings, like a mighty grade 120 chain sling, can become overly stressed and eventually unsafe to continue using. Heat, chemicals, and heavy loads all take a toll on a chain slings longevity.

If you notice any of the following on your chain slings, cut them up into 3′ to 4′ lengths (to prevent salvaging) and then recycle them:

  • Stretched or overly-elongated links
  • Kinks or binding
  • Nicks or gouges in links

Synthetic Web Sling Inspection

inspection checklist for synthetic web slings

The softness and flexibility of polyester and nylon lifting slings make them great for lifting fragile or expensive cargo. But just because they’re lifting delicately, doesn’t mean that can’t become worn out and dangerous to use.

Discontinue use and cut the sling into 3′ to 4′ lengths (and cut the eye) if you notice any of the following:

  • Snags, tears, or cuts
  • Melting or charring of any surface area
  • Acid or caustic burns
  • Broken or worn stitching
  • Elongation that exceeds manufacturer’s recommendation
  • Distortion of any fittings

Polyester Round Sling Inspection

inspection checklist for polyester round slings

Round slings are a versatile, strong, and cost-efficient tool for lifting a variety of cargo types. Polyester round slings contain a continuous loop of polyester yarn inside and a durable polyester fabric on the outside that is usually color-coded by lifting capacity.

While round slings are able to handle large loads, even the smallest rip, cut, or tear is enough to make it unsafe for use. If you notice these issues during inspection, cut the sling in half to retire it from service:

  • Exposure of the yarn core or broken or damaged yarn
  • Heat damage
  • Discolored, brittle, or stiff areas
  • Acid or caustic burns

Rigging Hardware Inspection

inspection checklist for rigging hardware

Common pieces of rigging hardware used for lifts include: shackles, turnbuckles, hooks, links and swivels, rings, wire rope clips, and thimbles. The integrity of these smaller items is vital to rigging safety.

Prior to using rigging hardware, visually inspect each piece and discontinue use if you notice the following:

  • Excessive nicks, gouges, or corrosion
  • Bent, twisted, elongated, or cracked load-bearing components
  • Reduction in original dimension by 10% or more
  • Indication of heat damage
  • Missing or illegible load rating information

Purchase Smart, Use With Confidence

If any of the above signs are evident during your routine inspection, it’s likely time to replace your rigging gear. Similar to knowing your rigging inspection checklist, it’s helpful to learn what to look for when buying rigging and lifting gear so you can always ensure that you’re using the best equipment for the job, and enjoy years of safe use.

For official rigging equipment inspection requirements see OSHA section 1926.251.

Polyester Slings vs Nylon Slings: Which Web Sling Type is Better?

Are polyester lifting slings better than nylon lifting slings? This is a question our lifting and rigging product experts commonly get and the answer, as it often is with rigging gear, is that it depends on the job at hand.

Before we dive into the key differences between nylon slings and polyester slings, there are many similar advantages to these two types of synthetic slings that are important to know.

Advantages of Synthetic Webbing

1. Ideal for delicate loads

One of the most common reasons for a rigger to use synthetic slings instead of wire rope slings or chain slings is th fact that they won’t scratch or crush your load. That’s why synthetic slings are extremely popular in the construction industry and with ship haulers.

2. Cost-efficient

Synthetic slings are also an attractive choice due to their lower cost. If you’re wondering whether nylon slings are cheaper than polyester slings, don’t. The prices are more or less the same, and your focus should be on choosing the right sling for the job.

3. Lightweight

Compared to wire rope and chain, synthetic slings are much lighter, making them easier to transport and handle. Again, nylon is typically a little heavier than polyester, but it’s not much of a difference when you consider the weight of chain and wire rope.

4. Strong

It’s true that nylon is stronger on an individual fiber level, but a polyester sling can be made just as strong as a nylon one by adding more threading. And both types can easily lift several thousand pounds. So while it’s important to use a lifting sling that’s rated for the load your lifting, this won’t affect your choice between nylon and polyester.

Physical Differences

Now that you know how they’re similar, let’s look at the differences between the physical characteristics of nylon and polyester to determine which material type is best for your job.

Nylon has more stretch

This is one the most important differences between nylon slings and polyester slings. While nylon slings have more give to them (about 7 to 10 percent stretch when at WLL) that does not mean they are weaker than polyester (typically 2 to 3 percent stretch at WLL). The main reasons you would want more or less stretch when lifting a load include overheight lifting room and the potential for “snapback”.

If you have height limitations, polyester is probably the better choice. If your load could bounce around a lot, the extra stretch of nylon will reduce the danger of the strap snapping back at you or others. This difference in the stretch is why you typically see recovery straps made of nylon and tow straps made of polyester.

Polyester is softer and more flexible

Both nylon and polyester slings are good for delicate loads, but if you’re wondering which one is best for the most delicate loads, it’s polyester. The chemical coating on nylon webbing gives it a slightly more coarse texture.

Polyester is also a bit more flexible than nylon. By flexible, I’m not talking about stretch but rather the ability to wrap tightly around a load and grip the most surface area.

This is an important difference, especially when choosing between nylon endless slings and polyester endless slings.

nylon round endless lifting sling
Nylon Endless Sling
polyester round endless sling
Polyester Endless Sling

Environmental Differences

Another key question to ask when choosing between nylon slings and polyester slings is, what are the environmental conditions? There’s a reason why ship haulers and those in marine environments prefer polyester slings, they absorb less water and are just a bit more resistant to UV rays. But, you also need to consider the differences when it comes to chemical resistance.

Nylon slings can’t resist acids or bleaches

Avoid using nylon slings if you’re operating anywhere near sulfuric, nitric, hydrochloric, or phosphoric acids. Nylon is also unresistant to oxidizing bleach agents such as sodium hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, sodium percarbonate, and calcium hypochlorite.

Polyester slings can’t resist ethers or alkalis

On the other hand, polyesters Achilles heel is ethers and alkalis. Among other chemicals, this includes diethyl ether, dimethyl ether, sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, calcium hydroxide, calcium carbonate, and magnesium hydroxide.

Polyester Slings

best eye to eye lifting sling

browse all polyester sling

Conclusion

In short, synthetic lifting slings are a great choice due to their ability to handle delicate loads, lower cost, lightness, and impressive strength. In the polyester sling vs nylon sling matchup, the winner is whichever one meets the demands of your specific job best.

Nylon slings have more stretch but can’t be used near acids or bleaches. Polyester slings are softer and hug to load surfaces better but can’t be used near ethers or alkalis.

If you have any additional questions about nylon slings or polyester slings, give our rigging product experts a call at 800-404-7068.

4 Tips for Buying the Right Rigging & Lifting Equipment

If you work in the rigging and lifting industry you know that, when lives are on the line, close is never close enough. Safety measures, procedures, and equipment specs have to be spot-on.

Maintaining a safe job site starts with having the proper equipment for the job. But, with thousands of different rigging products, each with their own distinct characteristics, capabilities, and reputation, many riggers face the struggle of trying to choose the correct rigging and lifting equipment for the job.

Here are the 4 main things to pay attention to when deciding which rigging and lifting products are best for your particular job.

 

1. Assess what your lifting

To start, you need to assess the object or objects you are needing to lift or rig up. Does the object have sharp corners? Where is the center of gravity in your load? How much lifting space do you have? Asking these questions first will help to narrow down the potential rigging gear you can safely and effectively use for the job.

 

 

2. Know your Load Limit

working load limit on lifting gear for safety

Working load limit is the maximum weight that can safely be applied to a given piece of rigging equipment. It’s different for each individual piece of equipment, so be sure to pay close attention to this when selecting your rigging and lifting gear. Just one weak area puts the entire operation at risk. Check the weight of your load first, then ensure that you only buy equipment that is rated for that weight or more.

 

 

3. Consider Temperature & Environment

tips for choosing best rigging and lifting equipment

In applications that experience extremely high or low temperatures, certain equipment may not operate properly. For example, if you’re working in a high-heat environment, you will want to use wire rope with an independent wire rope core (IWRC) instead of a fiber core (FC). Also, consider the worksite environment. If saltwater is a factor, buy stainless steel rigging gear to prevent corrosion.

 

 

4. Opt for Quality

high quality lifting and rigging gear for manufacturing industry

Strength and durability is the name of the game when it comes to rigging and lifting gear. For the best chance of avoiding accidents and equipment that wears out quickly, you’ll want to ensure that you’re purchasing high-quality rigging equipment from trustworthy sources. It may not always be the most affordable choice, but it will be the smartest choice in the long run.

 

The importance of buying the right equipment is clear when you consider the stakes of lifting and handling heavy loads. Don’t guess. Take the time to thoroughly evaluate the job at hand before buying. When you do buy rigging and lifting supplies, be sure to check all the manufacturer specifications and ask questions if you’re unsure.

USCC has a team of dedicated product consultants that are just a phone call away. If you have product questions or would like to place an order over the phone instead of on our website, give them a call at 800-404-7068.

 

How to Use Plate Clamps Safely and Effectively

Plate clamps, or sheet clamps, make difficult lifts safer and easier. While these strong lifting tools allow for faster production speeds, they should not be used haphazardly. The use of plate lifting clamps requires an operator who is trained on their use and who takes safety seriously.

 

how to use plate lifting clamp
Remember to always position the plate clamp over the center of gravity to maximize control.

How Plate Clamps Work

Plate clamps eliminate the need for drilling or creating a hitch. The most important parts of a plate clamp include the lifting shackle, spring, teeth within the jaw, and the various links and pins. To lift a plate, the teeth of the plate clamp need to be pushed into the plate. With help from the powerful spring,  this turns the lifting point of the clamp into the lifting point of the plate and essentially causes the two objects to become one.

What’s great about plate clamps is that their grip strength automatically increases as the load gets heavier. Essentially, the weight of the load determines how much link tension there will be and the link tension determines jaw torque and ultimately grip strength. Learn more about what this means below.

 

How to Pick the Proper Size and Type of Plate Clamp

Choosing the proper size plate clamp will not only maximize safety but also extend the life of the plate clamp. To do this, you should buy a clamp with the closest working load limit (WLL) to the weight of the plate being lifted. This ensures that the jaw provides optimal clamping force and penetration. Keep in mind that bigger is not always better with plate clamps. There are minimum load requirements because a load that is too light will not be able to create sufficient grip strength. That’s why most plate clamps have both minimum and maximum load requirements stamped on them. It’s recommended that you avoid lifting a load that’s 20% below the rated capacity of the clamp.

plate lifting clamps without teeth
This Crosby® IPNM10P non-marring lifting clamp lifts plates without damage or scratching

You also need to pay close attention to the max jaw capacity of the plate clamp.  Jaw capacity should be as close as possible to the thickness of the material you’re lifting.

Lastly, you should not be lifting plates that have a surface that is harder than the teeth of the clamp. For plates that have an extremely hard surface or a surface which could be easily damaged, there are certain types of lifting clamps that have a non-marring jaw and no teeth. Examples of this are the Crosby® IPNM10 Lifting Clamps and the Terrier TNMK/TNMKA Lifting Clamps.

 

 

Safety Tips for Vertical Plate Lifting Clamps

Vertical plate lifting clamps can lift and turn over flat plates 180 degrees and can be used to transport plates in a vertical position.

Vertical lifting clamps should never be sideloaded and you should never try to lift more than one plate at a time. If you’re lifting a long plate, you should consider using two clamps connected to a spreader bar to minimize swing and maximize lifting safety. Also, keep in mind that plates which are hot in temperature can damage the structural integrity of the plate clamp. Columbus McKinnon recommends that you do not lift plates that are 250 degrees or higher.

 

Safety Tips for Horizontal Plate Lifting Clamps

spreader bar for lifting clamps
Spreader bars like this one are ideal for lifting long plates.

Just as their name suggests, horizontal lifting clamps are used to lift horizontal objects.

If you are lifting a long plate horizontally, never use a quad sling. This will cause the horizontal clamps to turn and potentially slip off. Instead, use a spreader bar with double-leg slings that connect to the plate clamp. When it comes to lifting short plates horizontally, one double sling with horizontal plate clamps on each end will suffice. To maintain proper lifting strength and control, always ensure there is a minimum included angle of at least 90 degrees. Never use vertical plate clamps for a horizontal lift.

 

How to Inspect and Care for Plate Clamps

Lifting clamps should be inspected every 1-4 weeks depending on use. To prevent plates from slipping, you should degrease clamps regularly and remove any grit, dirt, or mud. You should also lubricate the moving parts of the clamp, but never lubricate the teeth of a lifting clamp.  Check the teeth regularly for chips and breaks. According to ASME standards, chipped teeth are only acceptable if the chip is less than half the width of the tooth and the adjoining teeth are undamaged. If there is any tooth damage beyond this, the plate lifting clamp is not safe to use.

Other things to look for when inspecting plate lifting clamps include spring deformation, pad deformation, bending of hook ring, markings on top of the mouth, wear on any pins, pulling on rivets, and hook elongation.

minimize swing on a crane
For full inspection instructions, refer to ASME B30.20.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As stated above, choosing the proper size and type of lifting clamp is the best way to ensure longer plate clamp life. Another thing that riggers can do to care for their plate lifting clamps is to minimize swing during the lift. Less swing results in less stress on the lifting clamp and a good crane operator knows how to minimize swing.

 

If you have any other questions about plate clamps let us know in the comment section below. 

 

Buy Plate Clamps

US Cargo Control is proud to sell both Crosby® Lifting Clamps and Terrier Lifting Clamps. We are confident in the quality that these brands offer the rigging and lifting industry.

Temperature Ratings for Chain Slings

David Urlaub, Rigging & Lifting Specialist
David Urlaub, Rigging & Lifting Specialist

Although extremely strong, chain can still be negatively affected when exposed to temperature extremes. The acceptable temperature range will vary depending on the grade of the chain and will also vary in reduction of Working Load Limit (WLL).Adjustable-4-Leg-Chain-Sling-Common_1_375

See the chart below from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) regarding standard B30.9-2014  and reduction in WLLs; both temporary (while heated) and permanent (after cooled) temperatures are included. Keep in mind that the effects are cumulative over time. This means that each time the sling is heated to an excessive temperature, its WLL will be further reduced.

These effects are cumulative, so each time that same chain sling is heated to the excessive temperature, its working load limit will be reduced by an additional percentage.

new chart

Please note that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires all slings exposed to temperatures over 1000º F to be removed from service.

When slings are exposed to extreme temperatures, contact the sling manufacturer for instruction.

Questions? Call us at 866-878-9355. We’ll be happy to help.

-David

 

Chain Slings from US Cargo Control

da
David Urlaub, Lifting & Rigging Product Expert

Since we’ve expanded our line of chain lifting slings earlier this year, it’s been great seeing the different types and sizes of chain slings customers are requesting. This one has been one of the biggest we’ve seen lately.

These chains have a capacity of 234,000 lbs. at 60 degrees, which means it would break at about 1,000,000 lbs. It’s being used to lift a large pump that weighs 210,000 lbs.chain sling from US Cargo Control

 

All of our lifting chain slings are manufactured with chain that’s made in the USA and European-made fittings. All also meet or exceed the latest guidelines of the National Association of Chain Manufacturers (NACM), ANSI B30.9 standards, and specifications set by OSHA.

Types of Chain Slings

We offer four sling types: standard, adjustable, endless and basket.

3-Leg-Chain-Sling-Common_1_375
Standard Triple Leg Chain Sling

Standard chain slings. Manufactured with one, two, three, or four lengths of chain, and fitted with hardware at each end, with a master oblong link at the top.

Single Leg Standard Chain Sling
Double Leg Standard Chain Sling
Triple Leg Standard Chain Sling
Quad Leg Standard Chain Sling

 

 

Adjustable-2-Leg-Chain-Sling-Common_1_375
Adjustable Double Leg Chain Sling

Adjustable chain slings. Similar to standard chain slings, but each leg is also equipped with a shorter length of chain with a grab hook also attached to the master oblong link. This design allows the operator to shorten the chain leg length as needed.

Single Leg Adjustable Chain Sling
Double Leg Adjustable Chain Sling
Triple Leg Adjustable Chain Sling
Quad Leg Adjustable Chain Sling

 

 

endlessEndless chain slings. As it sounds, an endless sling is an endless loop of chain attached through a master oblong link at the top. An additional variation has two loops of chain attached through the same master oblong. Our endless chain lift slings are available to order via our Custom Chain Sling Order Form or by giving us a call at 800-660-3585.

 

 

basketBasket chain slings. In a similar design as the endless basket sling except it’s just one length of chain making up the body of the sling, with each end of the chain attached to the oblong master link. A double basket configuration has two lengths attached each to its own oblong link, with the oblongs then attached to a master oblong link. Basket chain slings can be ordered via out Custom Chain Sling Order Form or by phone at 800-660-3585.

 

Custom chain lift sling options

In addition to the four different types of sling, other options to customize the lift slings include the size of the chain, the grade of the chain, and the number of legs. Several end fittings are available including sling hooks, grab hooks, foundry hooks, self-locking hooks, and simple oblong links.

You can shop our online selection of chain slings here: Chain Slings & Lifting Chains, or give us a call at 800-660-3585 about any customization options you need. We’ll be happy to help find the exact sling you need.