A Complete Guide to Flatbed Trailer Tarps

Flatbed trailer tarps protect cargo from weather damage and general wear-and-tear that highway travel can cause. Tarps are waterproof and often made of vinyl, kevlar, or canvas with a polyethylene coating for added protection. Read on to understand the differences among types of flatbed trailer tarps, how to properly tarp a flatbed trailer, and how to repair a torn tarp.

 

Types of Flatbed Tarps

The type of tarp you should use depends on what you are hauling and how big it is. Not all tarps are created equal.

 

Lumber Tarps

how to use a lumber tarp

 

 

 

 

 

Lumber tarps are used on loads that are tall and box-shaped. They have flaps at each end to cover the ends of lumber. Both the sides and tail flap of a lumber tarp are usually fitted with grommets and multiple rows of D-rings for a variety of tie-down points. Usually, two lumber tarps are used to cover a flatbed load.

 

Steel Tarps

how to use steel tarps

 

 

 

 

 

Steel tarps on the most commonly used flatbed trailer tarp. They will also typically have grommets and D-rings built-in, however no flaps. They are used to protect shorter and lower-profile loads, and also used in combination with lumber tarps.

 

Smoke Tarps

how to use a smoke tarp

 

 

 

 

 

Smoke tarps only cover the upper front portion of a flatbed load. This protects loads from getting covered in exhaust fumes and dirt. They can also be used in combination with steel and lumber tarps when additional coverage is needed.

 

Machinery Tarps

how to use a machine tarp

 

 

 

 

 

 

Machinery tarps are designed to protect manufacturing or machine equipment from weather and road vibration. These heavy-duty tarps have grommets around the hems and multiple rows of D-rings on each side.

 

Coil Tarps

how to use coil tarps

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coil tarps are commonly used to protect steel or aluminum coils and cable spools during transport. Their rounded top-half allows for a fitted cover over cylinder-shaped loads. The side flaps are more rectangular shaped and split in each corner to allow transport chain to pass through.

 

How to Tarp a Flatbed Trailer Load

A tarp is only effective if it’s applied correctly and secured tightly. Follow these step for tarping a load on a flatbed trailer.

 

flatbed tarping

1. Lift your rolled-up tarp on top of the load and center it as best as you can.

2. You should always start from the back of your load. Start unrolling the tarp towards the back while keeping the centerfold of the tarp in the center of the load.

3. Once the tarp is unrolled, pull the bottom of the tarp so that it is covering the entire back of the load and touching the flatbed trailer.

4. Next, start unfolding the tarp once on each side, making sure it stays center.

5. If you are using multiple tarps repeat the steps above to cover any exposed cargo.

6. Once your tarps have been completely unrolled and your load is covered, roll up or fold in any excess tarp and secure the D-rings with bungee cords.

7. If your load is tall or oddly shaped, throw an extra tie-down strap over the tarp to prevent it from billowing.

 

How to Repair Tarps

Eventually, weather and prolonged use wear down tarps to the point that they must to be repaired to remain effective.

how to repair a tarp

  1.  Buy a flatbed tarp repair kit.
  2. Place the tarp on a flat surface with the underside facing up. Smooth out any wrinkled areas.
  3.  Cut a patch slightly larger than the tear.
  4.  Apply a heavy layer of tarp repair adhesive to one side of the patch and place over the tear.
  5.  Use a roller to smooth out and remove any air bubbles. Let dry for at least three hours.

 

Custom Tarps and Other Flatbed Equipment

Shop US Cargo Control for all your flatbed trailer equipment needs, including winch straps, winch bars, and custom tarps.

 

Hauling Wide Loads and Oversize Loads: Important Questions to Consider

Hauling wide loads or oversize loads can be a daunting challenge. There are many variables you must consider prior to taking on these jobs: permits, route selection, required truck and bed size, pilot cars, cargo securement equipment, and of course, oversize load/wide load banners and signage

Because wide load and oversize load regulations vary from state to state, the preparation required to haul these loads can often be more work than the haul itself.

 

What Makes a Shipment a Wide Load or Oversize Load? 

hauling oversize wide loads
Because these tires can’t be broken down into smaller parts, they must be hauled as an oversize load.

First, understand that a load is considered oversized based on either its width or weight. If your shipment is over on either measurement it is considered oversize. If your load meets all weight limits, but not width limits, it is considered a wide load.

Generally, if your vehicle or load is wider than 8’6″ you will need wide load permits. Legal length is usually 48′ to 53′, and maximum weight is about 46,000 pounds. However, this varies by state. Some states measure by the overall length while others only use kingpin to rear axle length.

For a comprehensive list of regulations by state, see our Wide Load and Oversize Load Banner Requirements by State post

If your shipment can be broken down into smaller or lighter parts, you will probably not be able to obtain wide load or oversize load permits.

 

When do Wide Loads and Oversize Loads Require Pilot Vehicles? 

oversize loads pilot car
Depending on your load size and route details, civilian or police escorts may be required.

If your shipment exceeds a 12′ width you may need one to two pilot vehicles. These vehicles will be able to warn you of any accidents, construction zones, bridges, low wires, or other upcoming hazards.  

Remember, many states only allow you to travel with pilot vehicles from 30 minutes before sunrise to 30 minutes after sunset. 

 

How Many Safety Flags, Oversize Load Signs, and Wide Load Banners do you Need? 

Again, this all depends on the size of your shipment. Generally, you need red safety flags on all four corners of your tractor trailer and amber warning lights up top to meet visibility requirements.  

Also, you will most likely need oversize load signs or wide load banners in both the front and rear of your vehicle. If you have pilot vehicles with you, they may also need flags and lights. Keep in mind that many states restrict or prohibit oversize loads during the holidays and over weekends.

 

Be Prepared for Oversize Load and Wide Load Hauling 

With the proper planning, oversize load and wide load hauling become much more manageable. The next time you need the proper flags, banners, lighting, or signage for oversize load or wide load hauling, US Cargo Control can help get you what you want, when you need it. 

hauling oversize loads
Shop Oversize Load Signs
oversize load safety light
Shop LED Lights
oversize load safety flag for sale
Shop Red Safety Flags

SC&RA Hauling Job of the Year Spotlight: Precision Specialized, Edwards Moving & Rigging 

US Cargo Control is a proud member of the SC&RA and had a great time attending the SC&RA annual conference in Boca Raton earlier this year.  

The entries for 2018 Hauling Job of the Year were seriously impressive and now the results are in. 

Find out what it took for two transportation companies to take home the trophy in their respective categories and see their incredible entry videos below. 

2018 SC&RA award winners
2018 SC&RA Hauling and Moving job winners. Source: SC&RA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hauling Job of the Year – Under 160,000 Pounds

Precision Specialized, a flatbed trucking company out of Ontario, Canada took home this award. Their massive job entailed transporting 16 various sized modules for the world’s largest designer of modular plant and demonstration-scale systems. These expensive and fragile modules ranged in size from 40′ x 12′ x 12′ up to a whopping 40′ x 16′ x 14′. The driving route, from the Greater Toronto Area to just south of New York City, was nothing short of hectic.

First, weight-per-axle restrictions on the bridge connecting Canada to the U.S. required numerous special application requests. Then, construction patterns in Pennslyvania made it extremely difficult to find a viable route. Eventually, it took a full road closure for five miles in both directions and a tricky two-trailer load. After two years of careful planning, including trimming low-hanging trees and coordinating power line clearance, the job was successfully completed. Precision used their Aspen 95-ton, 13-axle rear steer perimeter trailer, with a custom-made 13-foot deck.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q3FEakrge6M?rel=0

 source: PrecisionGroupAG


Hauling Job of the Year – 160,000 Pounds to 500,000 Pounds 

Edwards Moving and Rigging out of Shelbyville, Kentucky won the trophy for this middleweight category. In May 2017, they hauled three of the largest-ever fully assembled turbines 230 miles, from New York to Pennslyvania. Each turbine weighed in at 375,000 pounds and measured 16.25′ tall by 16.48′ wide.

After six months of planning and coordination with upper-level DOT personnel, the first turbine was loaded and delivered. It took 10 days and about 2,993-man hours for it to reach its destination. The route included going through a private property owner’s yard and, at one point, crossing over an interstate median and driving on the opposite side of the interstate. The final permitted weight of the configuration came to 913,227 pounds and measured 345′ x 19.5′ x 18′. It was all handled by a dual-lane 32-axle Aspen A500 expandable transporter with three Kenworth C500 tractors as the prime movers.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKetJ5G8N5I?rel=0

source: edwardsmovers


How to Enter Hauling Job of the Year Competition 

Does your transportation company have an outstanding job to share? Check out the rules and regulations to understand the different categories and judging criteria.  

For all your flatbed trailer equipment, including oversize and wide load signs, check out the USCC website for quality products that are backed by teams of dedicated consultants. 

How to Care for Ratchet Straps

Ratchet Straps and Tie Downs
US Cargo Control Ratchet Strap

Ratchet straps are one of the best ways to tie down and secure loads during transport. They’re relatively easy to use and care for, and US Cargo Control can customize them to your specific needs. Knowing how to care for your ratchet straps properly can extend their life and be more economical for you.

Our strong, yet lightweight, polyester straps are ideal for a variety of applications. The fabrication allows for very little stretch, and resists abrasions, as well as damage from UV rays and most common chemicals.

Their minimal absorption of water prevents shrinkage, mold, mildew, and rotting, even after being exposed to the elements over time. These qualities also make them a long-lasting and economical choice, especially for outdoor uses.

Ratchet Strap Maintenance and Storage

When straps are not in use, there are recommended ways to maintain and store them.

First, before storing them for any length of time, it’s important to make sure the webbing is clean and dry. To wash your straps after usage, before storage, simply hose them down with water and let them dry before storing.

If you find that your straps are not coming clean with this method, you can mix a mild detergent with warm water and scrub with a quality scrub brush to loosen any dirt and debris. Avoid bleach-based cleansers or any with acid additives.

Also, keep in mind that although it’s tempting to toss straps in a pile after usage, taking the time to wind up a strap is also an ideal time to inspect the webbing for rips, tears and abrasions. If you work with a lot of tie down straps, especially the 2”, 3″ and 4″ widths, check out our Strap Winder.

You preferably want to store ratcheting straps in a dry place away from sunlight. The actual steel ratcheting mechanisms build up corrosion over time if you leave them exposed to moisture–then they just become more difficult to use.

Items to Help Store Your Ratchet Straps

Bungee balls. These handy ties come in a bulk package of 100 so you’ll have plenty to wrap up your tie down straps, and some left over for other uses: securing canopies, keeping box lids closed, anchoring yard ornaments, bundling tent poles, etc.

Bungee cords. Like bungee balls, the uses are endless with bungee. Our bungee cord selection comes in a wide range of sizes, sure to fit around even your largest 4″ winch straps or ratchet straps.

Cinch strap. Velcro cinch straps are great for securing loose webbing. If you have a trailer with E-track installed, you can loop the strap through an E-track fitting with O-ring to keep straps up and off the floor.

If you have any questions about all things ratchet straps, give us a call at 866-444-9990.

Flatbed Starter Kits Convenient for New Drivers, Growing Fleets

Flatbed Starter Kits bundle essential must-haves to get your rig or fleet rolling. Whether you’re hauling lumber, steel, or both, our sales reps have carefully selected tarps, straps, chain, and additional accessories to properly secure and protect most any load. Or, we can put together a product mix just for you!

Easy, convenient, and value-priced — particularly for growing companies and setting up new drivers. Outfitting your trailer in a single step saves you valuable time and money, which are among our top priorities here at US Cargo Control. That, and providing quality offerings to help ensure your deliveries arrive safely and damage-free. Check out these application-specific assemblies:

Lumber

USCC’s Flatbed Starter Kit for Lumber Hauling features two of our largest (24’ x 27’) heavy-duty lumber tarps, each with an 8’ flap to seal the ends of the lumber units. This tarp style is also used as an all-purpose cover for hay bales, pallets, and other bulky cargo. Roughly two lumber tarps are needed to go across the entire surface of a load on standard 48’ or 53’ flatbed trailers.

The pack has 50 21” rubber tarp straps with crimped S-hooks that attach to the tarps’ integrated grommets and D-rings. Other tie downs include 10 4” winch straps and four 2” ratchet straps to further anchor the tarp and limit damage from whipping in the wind. A total of 20 plastic corner protectors will keep straps from crushing your cargo, as well as pad sharp edges of the load to extend strap life.

We’ve tossed in a winch bar for tensioning and releasing winch straps, along with a strap winder.

Steel

Designed to protect steel rods, sheets, cable, and lower-profile items, the Flatbed Starter Kit for Steel Hauling comes with two 16′ x 27′ steel tarps. Similar to a lumber tarp but without the end flap, each steel tarp is constructed from heavy-duty, 18 oz. PVC-coated polyester for superior tear resistance. A 4′ drop on all sides means your cargo is fully encased and shielded against rain, snow, wind, and road debris.

Two rows of D-rings on each side of the tarps, along with grommets spanning the perimeter, make tying down easy using the included 50 21” rubber tarp straps, six 4” winch straps, four 2” ratchet straps, and 12 plastic corner protectors for webbing up to 4” wide.

The kit comes with other tools, too. Eight grade 70 chains with grab hooks offer durability for stabilizing large loads. You also receive eight 5/16″ – 3/8″ ratchet chain binders and 16 steel corner protectors. Eight coil racks and eight coil mat friction pads reduce the risk of injury and damage caused by shifting during transit.

Deluxe (Lumber & Steel)

Prepare for hauling nearly anything. The versatility of the Flatbed Deluxe Starter Kit covers it all, including both lumber and steel. This version contains:

Custom

Don’t see the combination of products you need? Design your own! Any equipment can also be purchased separately. Call our sales team at 866-348-3473 to discuss custom options and pricing. We’re committed to supporting your operation’s success. What you want, when you need it.

US Cargo Control Employees Experience Hands-On Training

Flatbed training on products from uscargocontrol.com
Instructor Freddie Jones (left) leads an interactive hands-on training session with employees of US Cargo Control.

Sixty employees of US Cargo Control were recently treated to a Continuing Education opportunity at their offices in Urbana, IA. Instructors from nearby Kirkwood Community College’s Professional Truck Driving program led four separate two-hour training sessions featuring hands-on experience with a variety of tools and equipment drivers use to secure cargo on a flatbed trailer.

Freddie Jones, operations manager for Kirkwood’s Truck Driving program, and Dennis Carson, instructor for Kirkwood’s Truck Driving program, were the presenters for Friday’s training sessions. Both men have many years of real-life experience driving trucks.

The training began with a short video detailing some of the cargo securement laws that drivers must abide by, what a driver’s CSA (compliance, safety, accountability) score is and different ways it can be affected, as well as how to calculate Working Load Limit weights and the number of tie-downs necessary for a particular load.

The group then headed outside where a flatbed trailer was waiting with a skid loader and stack of pallets, both ready to be properly secured.

Hands-on items

Some of the equipment US Cargo Control employees learned to use included ratchet straps, tie down straps, winches, winch bars, chain, chain binders, corner protectors, tarps and tarp straps. Best-practices stories were also shared with the group.

Jones and Carson learned a few things from the US Cargo Control employees, as well. They were excited to discover tools offered by uscargocontrol.com like the Peerless QuikBinder™ Plus Ratchet Loadbinder that is easier to use than a more traditional ratchet chain binder; and the VeeBoards® Extension Handle that helps position corner protectors atop tall loads while the driver remains standing on the ground.

Ongoing Education

David Urlaub, US Cargo Control’s training coordinator, says the benefits of this type of training to the company’s employees are immeasurable. “Giving USCC employees the chance to use the products so they can take that back to their jobs and pass along correct information to the drivers who use our products is extremely important,” Urlaub said. He added, “We can better understand what a truck driver goes through on a daily basis to tie down their loads, and see how physical this job is for the drivers. Any products that make their life easier could be good additions to our site.”

While employees of US Cargo Control have ongoing product training throughout the year, this is the first hands-on training session. This training was funded by 260E dollars. The goal, according to Urlaub, is to have this type of training on an annual basis going forward.

Winches for Flatbed Trailers

67006-double-l-sliding-truck-tie-down-winch-black_1_375While a winch is a common term in the trucking industry, truck winches are still most often thought of as equipment designed for hoisting or hauling 4×4 trucks and sport utility vehicles while off-roading. Winches for flatbed trailers are different as they are designed for securing cargo straps to a flat bed trailer.

We’ve outlined the most common types of flatbed trailer winches. Generally, tractor trailer winches are right hand styles; left hand models are less common but are often available by request. Trucking winches are also classified as either side mount or bottom mount.

The different types of winches for tractor trailers include:

Weld-on Winches
Designed for permanent placement, excellent for strength and security and quick use.

Sliding Winches
Intended for use with winch track. Allows the operator to slide the winch to any spot along the track, then locks in place when tension is applied. Great for more precise strap placement that’s faster than removing and reattaching portable winches.

Portable Winches
Designed with two screws attached so you can place the winch just where you need it along the trailer side channel to offer exact strap placement where you want it.

Combination Winches
Can be used with either webbing winch straps or wire cable. Available in a sliding or weld on style.image

Low Profile Winches
Available as a sliding, portable or weld-on style, the low profile design reduces the risk of winch bar rollover, for an added measure of safety. It can also reduce tensioning time.

Lashing Winches
Can be either welded or bolted in place, or with a winch track, and offers the easy operation and fast release of a ratchet. A lashing winch is a smaller style than winches that accept 4″ webbing; this style is generally for use 2″ webbing.

Stake Pocket Winches
Turns standard stake pockets into instant anchor points for winch straps. Install easily without tools and can be removed when not in use. The popular Porta Winch is also a popular choice, as it’s available in both a standard outward off-set option and an inward off-set option to allow for track-mounted tarp clearance.

Ratcheting Cap
A simple cap that can be placed over any traditional winch to convert it to a ratcheting winch so it’s faster, easier, and safer to tension a strap. Our SilverCap® OverDrive™ ratcheting cap includes all parts.

Shop our full selection of winches and related equipment:

flatbed trailer winches from US Cargo Controlwinch track from US Cargo Controlwinch bars from US Cargo Control

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Transport Chain & Binder Packages Now Available

US Cargo Control is now offering chain and binder packages.

There are 45 different combinations of kits available varying in grade, size and style. Each combination includes one chain and one binder and meets the standards of the National Association of Chain Manufactures (NACM), Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) and Department of Transportation (DOT).

The prepackaged kits are cheaper compared to buying the equipment separately. The packages are also a convenient option for those who may not be sure what size chains and binders work together. The kit offerings simply take the hassle out of trying to figure out what you need.

Grade 70, Grade 80, Grade 100 and Grade 120 options are all available.

Kit Descriptions

Grade 70 5/16" x 16' Chain-Ratchet Binder Kit
Grade 70 5/16″ x 16′ Kit

A Grade 70 Transport Chain and Binder Package is available. It includes one, Grade 70 carbon steel chain with a yellow, zinc chromate finish and a ratchet binder featuring a forged steel handle. The size, break-strength and working load limit are displayed on the handle.

Grade 80 5/16" x 15' Chain- Peerless Ratchet Binder Kit
Grade 80 5/16″ x 15′ Chain- Peerless Ratchet Binder Kit

Another Grade 70 kit is available. It includes one, Grade 70 Transport Chain and one, Peerless QuikBinder Plus Ratchet LoadBinder. The Quikbinder is a trademarked tool that is boasted as a safer, stronger, faster and more functional load binder compared to the more basic ratchet and lever styles. A Grade 80 kit is also available, featuring a QuikBinder and Grade 80 alloy chain.

Grade 100 5/16" x 15' Durabilt Ratchet Binder Kit
Grade 100 5/16″ x 15′ Chain- Durabilt Ratchet Binder Kit

The Grade 100 Kit includes one, Grade 100 Chain made with alloy steel and one, Durabilt Truck-Tight Ratchet Chain Binder. The Truck-Tight binder is made with forged alloy steel and features a powder coat finish.

The Grade 120 package includes one, Grade 120 Pewag Grade Square Link Transport Chain and one, Pewag Ratchet Binder. This powerful chain features a square link profile that provides superior strength and is resistant to damage. The blue color is also known industry-wide as the identifying color for Grade 120.

Grade 120 9/32" x 16' Pewag Chain- Pewag Binder Kit
Grade 120 9/32″ x 16′ Pewag Chain- Pewag Binder Kit

Contact US Cargo Control 

Product experts are available by phone to answer questions, take orders and provide information on bulk quantity pricing. You can call one of them toll free at 866-348-3473. Free shipping is available on orders of more than $2,000.

Tips for Avoiding Injury with a Lever Load Binder

Safety is a priority in the trucking industry.

In 2012, truck drivers were three times more likely to receive a nonfatal injury on the job compared to the average US adult worker, according to The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC also reports the most common injuries in the trucking industry include strains and sprains, bruising, fractures, cuts and soreness. These issues are typically caused by drivers overexerting, crashing, failing or being hit with an object.

Lever load binders can contribute to that risk, but there are precautions drivers can take to keep themselves and others safe.

2M3A0915
A lever chain binder used to tighten chain and secure a load to a flatbed trailer.

Lever Load Binders

Lever load binders have been used in the industry for decades and still are today. They use leverage to tighten chain and secure cargo to a trailer.

This specific style requires a lot of energy to engage, about 170 lbs., according to the organization Trucking Injury Reduction Emphasis, or TIRES. The force needed to operate the lever can easily cause sprains and strains.

Cheater Bars

Because lever binders require so much strength, drivers are often tempted to use a cheater bar to help tighten and release the handle. Using a cheater bar increases the risk of injury.

If the driver loses his or her grip, the lever and bar can snap or kickback and hit the driver. The bar can also fly off the lever and risk hitting people or property nearby.  Cheater bars can also exceed the working load limit, causing the strap or chain to break.

Cheater bars are considered dangerous, and are not recommended.

Peerless QuikBinder Plus™ Ratchet Loadbinder - 1/2"-5/8"
Peerless QuikBinder Plus™ Ratchet Loadbinder – 1/2″-5/8″

Alternative Binders

Ratchet binders are generally known throughout the industry as the safer option and require less energy to engage, about 10 lbs., according to TIRES. The ratchet design also gradually releases unlike a lever.

Another option includes the patented QuikBinder PLUS which is touted as stronger, safer and more functional compared to a standard ratchet or lever binder.

 

Lever Binder Safety Tips  

If you are going to continue using a lever binder here are a few precautionary safety tips:

  • Routinely inspect the binder for wear, do not use it if you see bending and cracks.
  • Do not operate the lever binder with more than one person
  • Do not operate the lever binder while you or someone else is standing on the load
  • Operate the lever binder in a way that you are on the ground, with secure footing
  • Never use a cheater bar to tighten or release the load
  • Always tighten, by hand, in a downward manner
  • Be aware of the line of fire should you lose your grip
  • Always wear gloves to keep your grip and to protect your hands.

US Cargo Control offers many styles of chain binders, including lever, ratchet and the QuikBinder Plus. You can check out the full binder inventory by visiting the website or by calling a sales specialists at 866-348-3473.

Customer Photos: Hotshot Rig & Tie Downs

A special shout out to loyal US Cargo Control customer Randy Eilerts.

Randy runs a hotshot rig out of Algona, Iowa. His company Tallgrass Trucking LLC ., uses a heavy duty pickup truck to pull a flatbed trailer. That compares to a more traditional setup, like a semi tractor-trailer combination. Randy trusts US Cargo Control to outfit his rig with tie down equipment. Pictured, he’s hauling a heavy, flatbed load and secured it with US Cargo Control ratchet straps, corner protectors, chain and lever binders.

Thanks for the photos, Randy!

11292939_10102389526337031_460915567_n
Randy Eilerts of Algona, Iowa operates a hotshot rig outfitted with US Cargo Control equipment.

 

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Randy Eilerts of Algona, Iowa operates a hotshot rig outfitted with US Cargo Control equipment.

 

Why Should I use a QuikBinder Plus as a Chain Binder?

Safety is a big concern when it comes to securing large loads to a flatbed trailer.

The Peerless QuikBinder Plus Ratchet Loadbinder is boasted as a safer, stronger, faster and more functional load binder compared to the more basic ratchet and lever binder styles. It can be quickly installed and can be used in three positions: the ratchet extension, the ratchet take-up and a free-spin setting that allows for adjusting in either direction.

Peerless QuikBinder Plus™ Ratchet Loadbinder - 1/2"-5/8"
Peerless QuikBinder Plus™ Ratchet Loadbinder – 1/2″-5/8″

This trademarked chain binder is compatible with both grade 70 transport chain and grade 80 alloy chain. There are three available sizes 5/16’’-3/8’’, 3/8’’-1/2’’ and 1/2’’- 5/8’’ with working load limits of 7,100 lbs., 12,000 lbs., and 18,100 lbs., respectively.The working load limit is also permanently displayed on the handle.

The folded handle is an enhanced safety feature that keeps the handle out of the way after the load is secured. It also makes the binder easy to hang and store.

Security is another perk. The QuikBinder Plus can be locked with a padlock, making it more difficult to mess with the binder, assembly and load.

This chain binder is heat treated, proof tested and is in compliance with Department of Transportation (DOT) and Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) standards.

If you’d like to learn more give a US Cargo Control sales specialist a call at 866-348-3473.

What’s the Difference between Ratchet Binders and Lever Binders?

A chain binder, is a tool used to tighten chain as a method to secure cargo to a trailer for transport. There are two common styles; the ratchet binder and the lever binder.

ratchet chain binder
Ratchet Chain Binder 5/16″ – 3/8″

The Ratchet Binder 

A ratchet binder also known as a ratchet chain, uses a ratcheting mechanism to create tension in the chain and secure the load. It features a ratchet handle and two tension hooks on each end. Ratchet styles are often noted as the safer option between the two types because it’s design does not store as much energy in the handle, reducing the risk of the bar recoiling or snapping back.

 

 

The Lever Binder

lever binder
Lever Binder 5/16″ – 3/8″

Lever binders also known as a lever chain or snap binder, uses leverage to tighten the chain and secure cargo. The tool features a tension hook on each end. Lever binders are typically easier to install because they have a more simple design. This style stores energy in the handle and can be tougher to tighten as it requires more strength. People often use cheater bars because of it. Those bars are considered dangerous and are not recommended.

 

Binder Pricing 

There is a difference in price between the two types of load binders. Lever binders are typically the more economical choice. US Cargo Control offers binders individually or in packs. Free shipping is available on orders of $2,000 or more.

Selecting the Right Size

Once you’ve zeroed in on your preferred style, it’s time to determine the size.

US Cargo Control lever and ratchet binders feature the same forged steel handle, break strengths and working load limits based on the size of the binder. Both types are designed to work with designated sizes of grade 70 and grade 43 chain. It is important to know the size and grade of chain you are working with when shopping for a compatible binder.

Two measurements are listed on each type. The numbers indicate the size of chain the binder is recommended to work with. The first number indicated grade 70 transport chain while the second number shows grade 43 test chain. For example, a 5/16’’ – 3/8’’ binder is compatible with 5/16’’ grade 70 chain and 3/8’’ grade 43 chain. Be aware of these numbers. The assembly is only as strong as its weakest link. A smaller binder may fit, but it will bring down the working load limit of the entire operation.

Deciding on a Binder 

Many factors come into play when deciding which binder is best. Operators should select their preferred style based on their comfort level when it comes to tightening the mechanism. If you need further help give one of our US Cargo Control sales specialists a call at 866-348-3473.