Grade 120 Chain and Components at US Cargo Control

We’ve added a wide selection of the strongest and toughest chain grade components to our inventory.

A full line of Grade 120 chain and chain sling components are now available through US Cargo Control.

Grade 120 is a high-strength, ultra-premium quality alloy steel with the highest working load limits in the industry. Now it’s easier than ever to get the G120 products you need to tackle the toughest overhead lifting and transportation jobs.

We’ve added a wide selection of the strongest and toughest chain grade components to our stock. And with a large inventory of bulk g120 chain, fittings, chain and binder kits, and more, you can count on US Cargo Control for all of your Grade 120 transport and rigging and lifting needs!

4 Benefits of Grade 120 Components

Length of blue grade 120 chain showcasing the square-link design.

1. It’s the Strongest Chain in the Industry

Grade 120 chain and components are 50% stronger than Grade 80 and 20% stronger than Grade 100 products. That added strength means you can select a smaller chain size for the job that’s lighter in weight and easier to handle – all without sacrificing working load limits.

2. It’s Extremely Durable

G120 chain features a revolutionary square link design that offers superior fatigue and bending resistance, making it an excellent choice for a wide variety of lifting applications. The patented square profile also offers increased contact between the surfaces on the links, resulting in a better grip than a traditional round link-style chain. A blue powder-coated finish adds corrosion protection.

3. It’s Easy to Identify

All Grade 120 Chain and Components feature a light-blue powder coating for quick and easy identification. You will also find either “120” or “12” markings on the chain and components as additional identification as Grade 120 alloy.

4. It’s Made by Pewag

Our Grade 120 chain and components are made by Pewag, an industry leader in quality chain products. With a history dating back over 500 years, Pewag is an established and trusted manufacturer in the transportation and lifting industries.

Grade 120 Chain Slings

Chain slings manufactured with grade 120 chains offer the highest strength available on the market. They are excellent for heavy-duty lifting applications.

There are two main types of lifting slings: standard and adjustable. Both options allow the user to customize the sling to suit their specific lifting application. Choose from several options including the number of legs, length of the chain, and type of end fitting.

Blue Grade 120 standard chain sling with a sling hook and oblong link at opposing ends of the length of chain.

Standard Chain Sling

Features a fixed-length of Grade 120 Chain and available in a variety of length and end fitting combinations

Blue adjustable single-leg chain sling with a sling hook and oblong link at opposing ends of the length of chain.

Adjustable Chain Sling

Can be designed with the same leg configurations as standard slings, but an additional fitting allows the user to adjust the length of the chain.

Grade 120 Fittings

We stock a wide selection of G120 end fittings. Like all Grade 120 components, end-fittings all feature the distinctive blue powder-coat finish for superior corrosion protection and easy identification. Some of the most common options include:

Blue Grade 120 oblong master link ring.

Oblong Master Links are used at the top of chain slings.

Blue Grade 120 grab hook.

Eye Grab Hooks are designed for optimal interaction between chain and hook, making them excellent for a variety of lifting applications.

Blue Grade 120 self-locking hook.

Self-Locking Hooks feature a larger opening than typical eye sling hooks and automatically close and lock under load.

Blue Grade 120 sling hook with silver galvanized safety latch.

A Sling Hook has a forged and galvanized safety latch for a secure connection in a variety of lifting applications.

Tackle The Toughest Lifting Jobs With Grade 120

We recommend heavy-duty Grade 120 Chain for the toughest jobs. Whether you are in the trucking and transportation or lifting and rigging industries, the high-strength and superior quality of G120 alloy steel can stand up to even the most demanding applications.

If you’re looking for more information on chain slings, check out our main chain slings page on our website or our lifting slings category on our blog.


Are you ready to get your hands on some Grade 120 products? Contact our sales team today at 800-404-7068. Our team of product experts is here to answer any questions about rigging chain, lifting slings, and more.


We also do custom orders! Need a custom lifting sling? We can do that! Because we assemble all of our Grade 120 chain slings in-house, we can customize a lifting sling to meet your specific needs.

Protect Your Valuables with the Strongest Security Chain

Protect your items from theft with a case-hardened security chain and a high-quality lock.

What is Pewag Security Chain, how can you use it, and what sizes are available?

Have you had any of your valuables stolen, or felt nervous that someone might steal them? Have you had a chain that someone was able to cut loose? Do you need a stronger chain to secure your valuables? Better yet, do you want to feel secure knowing your items will be safe? Consider looking into a Pewag Security Chain.

hardened security chain pewag
Pewag 9/32″ Square Hardened Security Chain

A Resistant, Bolt Cutter Proof Chain

Protect your items from theft with a case-hardened security chain and a high-quality lock that comes with two security keys. We carry Pewag Security Chains that are considered to be the toughest security chains out there. By being the toughest chain, we mean the Pewag chain is the hardest chain to cut with bolt cutters. The biggest reason is the hardened steel chain is squared, so it will not allow bolt cutters to cut through it.

strongest security chain

With the chain link’s squared shape and impressive chain hardness of 63 HRC, this is a bolt cutter resistant chain that requires tremendous effort to cut, unlike standard round chains. This can get rid of the thief or even help catch the person who is attempting to steal and damage your item.

What Can I use a Pewag Security Chain for?

This type of specialized chain is very beneficial and recommended for people who do not want their items stolen or damaged. For example, you can use the Pewag security chain as a bike chain lock or a motorcycle chain lock. You can also use for larger items such as boats, vehicles, trailers, gates, and properties. The use is not limited, as long as you get the appropriate chain width and length for your application, you can use on anything you feel is worth protecting against thieves.

Sizes of Security Chains

We carry three sizes of Pewag security chain and they are mostly used for commercial and industrial applications. More specifically, the 9/32″ Security Chain is designed for securing smaller items like bikes and mopeds. The 3/8″ Security Chain and 1/2″ Security Chain are used to protect more industrial items and facilities. Keep in mind that the 1/2″ x 2′ Chain is the largest size Pewag produces and is designed to protect large valuable items and facilities.

Along with the hardened steel chains are chain locks that work with Pewag Security Chain for maximum security. We carry the Viro Panzer Lock For 9/32″ Security Chain, Viro Panzer Lock For 3/8″ Security Chain, and Viro Monolith Lock For 1/2″ Security Chain. The heavy-duty chain lock is a unique design that does not allow any tools to cut open the lock. These locks also come with top security profile nickel-plated brass keys for only you to unlock.

These chains can be sold by the foot. If you would like a complete setup, then check out the security chain packages that include the chains, locks, and keys.

If you lose your keys or need to duplicate them, then make sure to keep the included card that comes with the key code.

Want to learn more about Chains?

Check out this short video to get a better visual of what Pewag chains look like!

source: pewag

If you are ready to add an uncuttable chain and lock to your valuables, then head over to the chain section of the USCC website or give our sales team a call at 800-404-7068.

Corner Protector Comparison Video: What’s Best for Your Cargo?

Some of the different corner protectors we offer include plastic, steel, rubber, fabric, felt, and sleeves. What are the differences?

Corner protectors are an inexpensive way to protect not only your cargo but your straps, chains, tarps, and other tie-down equipment.

Some of the types of corner protectors that we offer include plastic, steel, rubber, fabric, felt, and sleeves.

Plastic Corner Protectors

Plastic corner protectors, or V boards, are flexible, lightweight, stackable, and weather resistant. We sell many different types of plastic corner protectors including corner protectors for bricks, flexible tarp corner protectors, and long and narrow edge protectors that are great for large sheets of drywall and plywood.

Steel Corner Protectors

Steel corner protectors are excellent for heavy-duty uses involving transport chain and for larger, heavier cargo like coils. The durable galvanized steel is protected from premature rust and allows these metal edge protectors to last a long time. We also sell steel corner protectors with rubber lining.

Felt Corner Protectors

Felt corner protectors are durable and tear resistant, great for protecting sensitive cargo and tie down straps. They’re made of industrial grade felt material and are commonly used as lifting sling pads and coil padding as well as for edge protection.

Protective Sleeves

We also have two different types of sleeves: the Cordura wear sleeve and the fleece sleeve protector. Both sleeves wrap around your tie down straps and provide abrasion resistance. The fleece sleeve also adds a level of padding and is great if you’re hauling vehicles with nice paint or chrome that you want to protect.

Extension Handle for Corner Protectors

Using corner protectors is easier than ever with our 8-foot extension handle, specifically designed to make it easier to place corner protectors, brick guards, and veeboards without having to climb onto the trailer. It extends to approximately 8 feet and then easily retracts to approximately 4 feet for easy storage.

3 Reasons to Buy a Manual Chain Hoist over an Electric Chain Hoist

Chain hoists are simple devices that give you a massive mechanical advantage. By leveraging small force over a long distance and transforming it to large force over a short distance, chain hoists are able to accomplish heavy lifts and pulls that would otherwise be impossible for a person to accomplish alone.

Chain hoists can be either electric or manual, and there are advantages and disadvantages to both. In this post, we will focus on manual chain hoists.

 

Manual Chain Hoist Advantages

hand hoist vs. lever hoistWhile manual chain hoists won’t lift quite as fast and effortlessly as electric hoists, there are many advantages to owning a manual chain hoist.

1. Manual chain hoists don’t require any electricity or power source. This makes them much more portable compared to electric hoists.

2. Manual hoists are more cost-efficient compared to electric or hydraulic hoists. Not only do electric hoists cost more initially, but they also raise electricity bills.

3. The simple design of manual hoists makes them easier to repair and maintain. No complex motors, wires, or electrical/hydraulic systems.

 

Although electric chain hoists are able to lift heavier loads, manual hoists can still have working load limits (WLL) up to 20 tons. As long as what your lifting is below that, there’s no reason not to opt for a manual hoist.

There are two main styles of manual chain hoists to choose from: hand hoists and lever hoists.

 

Hand Chain Hoists

Hand hoists have a simplistic design and are easy to operate and maintain.

Hand hoists require the use of both your hands to operate. As you pull one chain, a wheel turns a series of cogs, axles, gears, and sprockets and in turn rotates the second load chain to lift or pull your load. The lifting mechanism is designed to do most of the work for you. To ensure your safety and the safety of the load, many chain hoists have a braking system that prevents the load from slipping back. Unlike lever hoists, hand hoists are ideal for high vertical loads. You can continue to operate the pulling chain from the ground even when the hoist is positioned up high.

US Cargo Control sells both Columbus McKinnon hand hoists and Coffing hand hoists.

 

advantages of a hand hoist
CM Series 622 Hand Chain Hoist

chain hoist 1 ton
CM Cyclone Hand Chain Hoist

Coffing LHH Hand Chain Hoist

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Columbus McKinnon Manual Hand Hoist Models

  • CM 622 Hoist – a construction-grade hand hoist with low headroom and easy installation. 1/2 ton to 5 ton WLL.
  • CM Hurricane 360 Hoist – this hand hoist has a chain cover that rotates 360° so loads can be lifted, pulled, and positioned from nearly any angle. WLL ranges from 1/2 ton to 10 tons.
  • CM Cyclone Hoist – a high-quality, rigorously tested hand hoist that is 100% American made. Choose from 1/4 ton to 10 ton WLL.

 

Coffing Manual Hand Hoists Models

  • Coffing LHH Hoist – the compact design of this hand hoist makes it portable and easy to inspect and maintain. It also has low headroom and a WLL range of 1/2 ton to 20 tons.

 

Lever Chain Hoists

Lever hoists are also quite easy to operate and maintain. To operate them, you simply crank a side lever that is attached directly to the lifting mechanism. Unlike hand hoists, lever hoists can be operated using just one hand. This makes them ideal for horizontal, angled, and low vertical loads. Because the lever handle is located up next to the lifting mechanism, you must be close to the point of hook-up to operate.

US Cargo Control sells quality Columbus McKinnon (CM) lever hoists and Coffing lever hoists.

 

3 ton lever chain hoist
CM Series 653 Lever Chain Hoist

ratchet lever chain hoist
CM Tornado 360 Lever Chain Hoist

mini lever chain hoist
CM Mini Series 602 Lever Chain Hoist

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CM Lever Chain Hoists

  • CM 653 Hoist – this is a construction-grade lever hoist with a very short handle. Ideal for working in small spaces. WLL range from 3/4 ton up to 6 tons.
  • CM Bandit Hoist– this durable hoist is assembled in the USA with American made hooks and chain. Extremely portable and versatile with a 360° rotating handle. 3/4 ton to 6 ton WLL.
  • CM Tornado 360 Hoist – has a unique sidewinder lever handle that improves both lifting and pulling efficiency. Ergonomic design increases safety. Choose among 3/4 ton WLL to 6 tons, with load limiters as an option.
  • CM Mini Series 602 Hoist – this is the most compact lever chain hoist available. Extremely portable as it weighs only 6 to 7 pounds. Quick to load with a 1/4 ton working load limit.
  • CM Mini Series 603 Hoist – another extremely compact and portable chain hoist that features quick load attachment. Not quite as light but has a 1/2 ton working load limit.

 

Coffing Chain Hoists

  • Coffing LSB Hoist – this lever hoist features a through-hardened load chain and lifetime lubricated gears. 360° rotating handle for versatile rigging options. WLL ranges from 3/4 ton up to 6 tons.

 

Chain Hoist Video

Lacy has more information on the chain hoists we sell in the video below.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJ5TfYDU1Xg?rel=0

How to Choose and Use Tire Chains like a Pro

Tire chains are a lifesaver once roads become covered with ice and hard-packed snow. Here in Eastern Iowa, the temperatures are falling quickly as we wave farewell to summer and slide closer towards winter. Make sure you’re fully prepared for hazardous winter road conditions by stocking up on quality steel tire chains for your vehicle.

 

When to use Snow Chains

Obviously, you’ll want to use tire chains when there’s a layer of snow or ice on the road you’re driving on. But, you do not want to drive with snow chains on your truck or semi tires when there is no snow or ice present. This could not only cause damage to the road (which can result in fines), but it could also destroy your tires.

Since you never know exactly when snow or ice could show up, it’s smart to carry a full set of tire chains with you in your vehicle. Commercial truck drivers, who need numerous tire chains, might consider investing in a toolbox for their truck or a tire chain carrier that will help protect chains and also keep them organized.

 

Tire Chain Laws

There are strict tire chain laws in many states that require truck drivers to have the appropriate tire chains in their rig at all times. Once the snowy weather sets in, it’s common to see roadside checkpoints pop-up where officials check to make sure you have the proper number of chains. If you don’t, you may be fined. Some states also have laws that explicitly prohibit the use of tire chains in certain situations, so be aware of the laws in the state which you are driving.

how fast can you go with tire chains
Most people recommend you not exceed 30mph with tire chains on.

 

How Fast can you Drive with Chains?

If you have tire chains on, you should really never be going faster than 30mph. Faster speeds risk damaging the chain links and that could wreak havoc on your tires or fenders.

 

Practice Installing your Tire Chains

Winter weather changes quickly and some roads you drive on will be worse than others depending on when a snowplow comes through. Instead of learning how to put your tire chains on when you’re pulled over on the side of the road in the middle of a blizzard, it’s a smart idea to practice putting them on and off in more favorable conditions. This will help minimize frozen fingers and also save you a bunch of time. Also, if you don’t already, you should keep a high visibility reflective safety vest with you and emergency warning triangles so that passing drivers can see you in those low-visibility conditions.

 

Tire Chain Comparison Guide

The main difference among the tire chains sold at US Cargo Control is seen in the chain link styles. The Glacier chain made by Pewag has twist links, while the more premium Pewag tire chain features square links. Square links provide higher traction on ice compared to twist links but come at a higher cost. Twist links and square links both perform quite well in snow. Another huge benefit to using square link tire chains is their ability to be reversed without causing damage. This allows them to have double the life, and also makes it easier to install them.

snow chains for sale online
The more economical Glacier snow tire chains are a lighter weight since they are made of carbon steel.

how effective are snow chains
The Premium Pewag tire chains are heavier since they are made of a thicker alloy steel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Buy the Best Tire Chains

Below is a chart that outlines all the differences you should know when deciding which type of tire chain is best for you.

Part #Tire SizeSingle or Dual Tire?Chain WeightLink StyleSteel TypeSteel ThicknessReversible?Side Cam Installation?
TC225SG22.5"Single51 Lbs.TwistCarbon6mmNoYes
TC225SP22.5"Single56 Lbs.SquareAlloy7mmYesYes
TC225DG22.5"Dual94 Lbs.TwistCarbon6mmNoYes
TC225DP22.5"Dual103 Lbs.SquareAlloy7mmYesYes
TC245SG24.5"Single56 Lbs.TwistCarbon6mmNoYes
TC245SP24.5"Single59 Lbs.SquareAlloy7mmYesYes
TC245DG24.5"Dual101 Lbs.TwistCarbon6mmNo Yes
TC245DP24.5"Dual105 Lbs.SquareAlloy7mmYesYes

 

Using Chain Binders to Safely Tie Down Heavy Cargo

Chain binders are an intelligent securement tool for anyone who transports heavy vehicles and machinery, or for someone who wants a little extra peace of mind when it comes to hauling cargo.

Since the number of tie-downs you need to secure cargo is dependent on the cargo length, cargo weight, and cargo type, the value in using chain binders and tie-down chains increases as the weight of your load increases (you need the working load limits of all your tie-downs to add up to at least 50% the weight of your cargo).

Instead of using a large number of nylon tie-down straps, which are more susceptible to cuts and tears when secured to certain machinery (like a Bobcat bucket), use tie-down chains and chain binders for long-lasting securement.

 

benefit of chain binders over nylon tie down straps
Instead of nylon straps, use transport chain and chain binders to tie down sharp objects. image source

 

What is a chain binder?

Chain binders, also known as load binders, are chain tensioning devices used to anchor down large cargo loads for transport. They are commonly made of forged steel and feature grab hooks or other fittings on each end. Chain binders are available in a variety of styles, sizes, and working load limits to fit your needs.

 

How much does a binder weigh?

A common question we often get about chain binders is, “how heavy are they?” The weight of chain binders varies quite a bit depending on the style and the brand but, in general, chain binders can weight anywhere 3.5 Lbs. up to 20 Lbs. and beyond. Obviously, using a larger chain size will result in a larger and heavier binder.

 

Types of chain binders

There are two general types of chain binders to choose from, lever binders and ratchet binders. Each has different advantages and disadvantages to consider, but the main difference lies in how the binder is tightened.

 

benefit of a lever chain binder
Lever binders are considered easier to use, but not necessarily safer.

Lever Binder

Commonly called a snap binder, lever binders are easier to use and have fewer moving parts (less maintenance) compared to ratchet binders. With a mechanical advantage of 25:1, lever binders use leverage to tighten the chain and lock themselves after the lever rotates 180-degrees around the hinge. The lever stores energy so operators need to be careful not to let the handle recoil back at them.

 

 

 

ratchet binder vs lever binder
Ratchet binders take some strain off the operator but tightening and untightening generally takes longer.

Ratchet Binder

Comprised of a gear, handle, pawl, and end fittings, ratchet binders have a mechanical advantage of 50:1. Compared to lever binders, they have a slower and steadier loading and unloading process, but also cause less strain on the operator. Since the handle does not store much energy, they are generally considered safer to use compared to lever binders.

 

 

 

 

Tie down rules to consider before buying chain binders

According to the FMCSA, vehicles with wheels or tracks that weigh 10,000 Lbs. or more are required to be tied down and secured on all 4 corners (at a minimum). This weight of vehicle also requires a minimum of 4 anchor tie-downs (connections between the load and your trailer) and 4 tightening devices (binders).

Also, length plays a role in determining how many chain binders you will need for a given load. Loads 5′ or less require just one tie-down, however, if the weight of that object is more than 1,100 Lbs. two tie-downs are required. Loads 5′ to 10′ in length require 2 tie-downs.

rules for using tie downs
Length and weight both play a factor in determining how many tie downs you need.

 

How to maintain load binders

To reduce friction and prolong the life of a lever binder, it’s best practice to routinely lubricate its pivot and swivel points. For ratchet binders, you should lubricate both the screw threads and the pawl part.

When it comes to storing your load binders, it’s best to keep them somewhere dry and away from the dangers of chemical or environmental damage. Chain carriers or similar toolboxes are great for this.

 

how to tell if you need new transport chain
This chain has been stretched and bent beyond use. image source

When should you replace a chain binder or transport chain?

Be sure to routinely check your binders for any signs of wear including bending, cracking, nicks, or gouges. If you find evidence of this, it’s best to replace your binder. As for your chains, you should be checking the individual links regularly for twisting, bending, stretching, or elongation. Don’t forget about checking hooks and other attachments as well.

 

Buy quality chain binders

If chain binders and transport chain sound like the cargo securement solution you need, there’s no better place to get them than US Cargo Control. With dozens of different chain binder options to choose from, as well as a variety of chain grades and chain hooks, we have the solution you need to safely and securely transport heavy cargo.

 

Chain Grades: Comparing Grade 30, Grade 43, Grade 70, Grade 80, Grade 100, and Grade 120 Chain

We turned one our most popular posts, “What are the Differences Between Grade 70 Chain, Grade 80 Chain, Grade 100 Chain, and Grade 120 Chain?”, into a simple chart for quick and easy chain grade comparison.

We also added information on the Grade 30 chain and Grade 43 chain. While we don’t sell these chain grades on our website, you can always call in to order them.

chain grade information

Typical Chain Uses

Grade 30

General purpose economical chain. Used in a variety of industries and jobs including light construction, agricultural applications, and the marine industry.

Grade 43

Typically used for container securement, logging, farming, towing, marine applications, and as general purpose utility chain.

Grade 70

Made from a higher strength, heat-treated carbon steel that has a load rating approximately 20 percent higher than Grade 43. The gold chromate finish makes it easy for DOT officials to recognize. Typically used by truckers, loggers, and highway crews for load securement and towing.

Grade 80

A high strength, heat treated alloy chain that can be used as a sling component for overhead lifting as well as heavy duty tow chain. The most economical choice that is suitable for overhead lifting.

Grade 100

A high strength, heat treated alloy chain. Primarily used as a sling component for overhead lifting.  Has approximately 25 percent higher strength than Grade 80. Popular in construction, manufacturing, and rigging applications.

Grade 120

An ultra-premium high strength chain designed specifically for the rigorous requirements of overhead lifting applications. The links have a unique square shape and it has approximately 50 percent higher strength compared to Grade 80. There are currently no official standards for Grade 120 chain in the U.S. or Europe, however, it does meet or exceed the standards of Grade 100 chain.

chain working load limits

Safety Standards for Chain

Organizations like ASTM (American Society of Testing & Materials), ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers), and OSHA (Occupational Safety & Health Administration) have released safety standards and regulations for various materials and grades of a chain.  

Essentially, it’s a formal way of recognizing and documenting that not all chain is created equally and therefore, it should not all be used for the same applications. 

ASTM Chain Specification 

What does A413, A391, and A973 all mean? Those are simply how the ASTM categorizes and references their specification standards. Each specification outlines the different manufacturing and testing requirements as well as the appropriate performance standards, grades, and applications.  

Determining Chain Grades

Chain grades are a standard method for showing the ultimate breaking strength (tensile strength) of a chain. Grades help determine what sort of applications are appropriate for a given chain. 

Chain grades are determined by calculating newtons per square millimeter, using the formula “N/mm2”.

Where “mm” is the area of the two cross-sections of a single chain link, and “N” is newtons. A newton is approximately 0.224805 lbs. 

So, to determine a chain grade, manufacturers must find the ultimate breaking strength. Then, divide that number by .224805 to determine ultimate breaking strength in newtons. Next, take that number and divide by the total area of two cross-sections of a single link. That number is the chain grade. 

You could reverse this formula to determine ultimate breaking strength if all you know if the chain grade.  

Note: chain grades advertised by manufacturers are one-tenth of the actual mathematical grades. So grade 80 is really 800, and grade 120 is 1,200. 

Determining Chain Working Load Limits

Working load limit (WLL) of a chain is another designated safety measure. WLL is a weight significantly less than the weight that would cause a chain to fail (tensile strength).

WLL = MBL / SF. Where MBL is minimum breaking load and SF is the safety factor.  

A safety factor is the ratio between allowable stress and actual stress. In other words, it’s the ratio between the chain strength and the expected maximum stress.

In lifting and rigging applications, factors such as gravity and the additional force caused by angles must be considered.  

Always adhere to the WLL to ensure a chain does not break or wear quicker than it should.  

New Product Alert: Grade 100 Chain Slings

US Cargo Control has launched a new manufacturing capability with the introduction of KWB Grade 100 signal violet chain slings to their product line. KWB, a Pewag company, is known for their high-quality chain and fittings, while Pewag is a leader in the chain manufacturing industry, known for their innovation and high-quality products.

Chain slings are a powerful tool in heavy-duty overhead lifting applications. They also perform well in situations where excessive heat is an issue, or environmental issues (like chemicals) may be present.

4-leg grade 100 chain sling by KWB, a Pewag company
4-Leg Grade 100 chain sling

US Cargo Control offers chain slings that are custom-made on-site with Grade 100 alloy chain and fittings. Our Grade 100 chain and fittings are manufactured by KWB, a Pewag company, in a high-visibility signal violet color that is easily identifiable in the field. High-quality and European-made, all KWB products exceed U.S. standards of NACM, ASTM and OSHA. Every link of chain is proof load tested to 2.5 times the WLL.

Grade 100 offers a 25% higher load capacity than G80, with smaller chain dimensions, considerable weight reduction and easier handling.

Types of Chain Slings

Chain slings come in single leg, 2-leg, 3-leg and 4-leg configurations. Each assembly can be tailored by number of legs, chain dimension, type of hook, and chain length. Assemblies are made in the USA with direct oversight provided. Every component offers traceability with appropriate markings.

Adjustable chain slings are also available. These slings are manufactured with shortening hooks on the master link that allow the legs to be shortened without a reduction in load capacity (WLL) due to 4-fold safety.

The signal violet color slightly varies between the chain and the fittings due to the thick powder coating the components have, versus the spray painted coating of the chain.

Eric Japenga

When choosing a sling for your application, US Cargo Control Sales Specialist Eric Japenga suggests starting with determining the amount of weight your lift will cover. After you know your load’s weight you can identify how many legs you’ll need, then the diameter of the chain.

Japenga says with lower-weight lifts that do not require much stability, a one-legged sling should do the job. Add another leg to handle more weight. For the heaviest lifts, a three-legged sling offers the highest working load limit (WLL). You can add a 4th leg that will add stability, although it will not increase the WLL above the 3-legged sling.

Adding Fittings to Your Chain Sling

When it comes to choosing the type of hook for your sling, Pewag offers the following guidelines:

KWB Grade 100 Clevis Sling Hook
KWB Clevis Sling Hook

  • Grab hooks are typically used in choke applications
  • Clevis hooks do not require a connector hook, and are their most popular style
  • Sling hook with latches offer an added safety feature and are OSHA compliant
  • Eye hooks need a connecting link and can also be used with wire or synthetic rope
  • Self-locking hooks offer greater safety than latch hooks because these latches must be released manually
  • Swivel hooks are versatile and do not swivel under load
  • Foundry hooks are used when you need a larger mouth opening, however it should be noted that before using this type of hook, check whether hooks without safety latches are allowed for your application

When ordering your chain sling, if you require a proof testing certificate, you must request one at the time of order, and a nominal fee will be charged.

US Cargo Control is the exclusive carrier in the continental United States for KWB signal violet chain in the 9/32” to ½” sizes, making this not only a quality product, but a unique one as well. In addition to our exclusive KWB chain sizes, we also offer Grade 100 signal violet chain in 3/4” and 5/8” sizes.

Give us a call with any questions or to place an order, 800-660-3585.

Tire Chains: Choose the Right Fit & Style for Safer Winter Driving

Tire chains can help keep your rig on the road when traveling through snow and ice, especially in steep mountainous regions.A sturdy set of tire chains is something every vehicle owner should consider carrying along during the winter months. Some states require drivers to have them on hand in case weather makes roads difficult or dangerous for driving. Tire chains bite into heavy snow, slush, and ice to give your rig extra traction and help ensure safe arrival at your destination.

Tire chains are available for many different tire sizes and specific travel needs. Be sure to check your vehicle’s instruction manual for recommendations regarding the use of snow chains.

Know your tire size

One tire chain may fit multiple tire sizes. To figure out your tire size, locate the letter/number combination on the tire’s sidewall. The first three-digit number refers to the tire width in millimeters (measured from one sidewall to the other). The two-digit number immediately after the slash mark is the aspect ratio percentage, calculated by dividing a tire’s height off the rim by its width. For example, a tire branded with 225/75 has a width of 225 mm, while the tire’s height is 75 percent of its width.

Consider your application

Are you part of the lumber industry or a utility company replacing downed power lines through hills and rough terrain? Or, more commonly, a trucker or highway service worker navigating hard-surface roads and steep mountain passes?

Do you have all-season — year-round — radial tires, or those designed for snow/mud? Snow tire shoulders are squarer and have a different tread than all-weather versions. Therefore, they require a longer chain to cover the added surface area.

Also, how often do you plan to mount the chains — after every snowfall or only when necessary? Do you require single chains, or duals?

We offer two styles of snow chains from Pewag, a leader in chain manufacturing. Both meet or exceed DOT and National Association of Chain Manufacturers (NACM) regulations:

Glacier chains deliver durable traction with a 6mm twist link that penetrates icy and snowy conditions. They’re an economical choice for light-duty and emergency use.

Premium chains in a 7mm square link design last four to six times longer than the traditional twist link tire chains. They also provide about 32% more surface contact than typical truck/tractor tire chains. These are best for regular use and can be mounted in reverse for longer life, less risk to the tire, and ease of installation.

Watch your speed with chains installed. Going faster than 30 mph will increase the risk of a chain failure. As road conditions improve or you’re back on bare pavement, remove the chains to avoid premature wear, increased fuel consumption, and damage to the road. They also can affect vehicle handling.

Practice installing beforehand

Don’t wait till you’re in trouble and standing in freezing temperatures to try putting chains on your tires for the first time. Make yourself familiar before you need them by reading mounting instructions and attempting an installation on dry ground. Always pre-fit tire chains before use to ensure correct fit.

If possible, “chain up” prior to reaching poor driving conditions. Always pull your car off the road away from traffic, like into a garage or parking lot. Lay the chain on the ground, remove twists or kinks, and check for signs of damage. Drape the chain relatively centered over the top of your tire, straightening it out to evenly distribute over both sides of the tire. Drive forward a few feet to expose the rest of the wheel that was previously touching the ground, and secure the chain squarely on the remaining surface. Depending on the style, tighten as instructed. After moving forward about 100 yards, stop and inspect the chains for correct tension and fit. Re-tension if necessary or if the chain starts to hit the wheel well. However, too much tension can lead to tire damage, wheels spinning, and increased chain wear.

Shop our entire selection of tire chains, or call and talk to one of our sales experts at 866-348-3473. We can find just about any size you need.

Temperature Ratings for Chain Slings

David Urlaub, Rigging & Lifting Specialist
David Urlaub, Rigging & Lifting Specialist

Although extremely strong, chain can still be negatively affected when exposed to temperature extremes. The acceptable temperature range will vary depending on the grade of the chain and will also vary in reduction of Working Load Limit (WLL).Adjustable-4-Leg-Chain-Sling-Common_1_375

See the chart below from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) regarding standard B30.9-2014  and reduction in WLLs; both temporary (while heated) and permanent (after cooled) temperatures are included. Keep in mind that the effects are cumulative over time. This means that each time the sling is heated to an excessive temperature, its WLL will be further reduced.

These effects are cumulative, so each time that same chain sling is heated to the excessive temperature, its working load limit will be reduced by an additional percentage.

new chart

Please note that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires all slings exposed to temperatures over 1000º F to be removed from service.

When slings are exposed to extreme temperatures, contact the sling manufacturer for instruction.

Questions? Call us at 866-878-9355. We’ll be happy to help.

-David

 

New Transport Chain & Binder Packages Now Available

US Cargo Control is now offering chain and binder packages.

There are 45 different combinations of kits available varying in grade, size and style. Each combination includes one chain and one binder and meets the standards of the National Association of Chain Manufactures (NACM), Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) and Department of Transportation (DOT).

The prepackaged kits are cheaper compared to buying the equipment separately. The packages are also a convenient option for those who may not be sure what size chains and binders work together. The kit offerings simply take the hassle out of trying to figure out what you need.

Grade 70, Grade 80, Grade 100 and Grade 120 options are all available.

Kit Descriptions

Grade 70 5/16" x 16' Chain-Ratchet Binder Kit
Grade 70 5/16″ x 16′ Kit

A Grade 70 Transport Chain and Binder Package is available. It includes one, Grade 70 carbon steel chain with a yellow, zinc chromate finish and a ratchet binder featuring a forged steel handle. The size, break-strength and working load limit are displayed on the handle.

Grade 80 5/16" x 15' Chain- Peerless Ratchet Binder Kit
Grade 80 5/16″ x 15′ Chain- Peerless Ratchet Binder Kit

Another Grade 70 kit is available. It includes one, Grade 70 Transport Chain and one, Peerless QuikBinder Plus Ratchet LoadBinder. The Quikbinder is a trademarked tool that is boasted as a safer, stronger, faster and more functional load binder compared to the more basic ratchet and lever styles. A Grade 80 kit is also available, featuring a QuikBinder and Grade 80 alloy chain.

Grade 100 5/16" x 15' Durabilt Ratchet Binder Kit
Grade 100 5/16″ x 15′ Chain- Durabilt Ratchet Binder Kit

The Grade 100 Kit includes one, Grade 100 Chain made with alloy steel and one, Durabilt Truck-Tight Ratchet Chain Binder. The Truck-Tight binder is made with forged alloy steel and features a powder coat finish.

The Grade 120 package includes one, Grade 120 Pewag Grade Square Link Transport Chain and one, Pewag Ratchet Binder. This powerful chain features a square link profile that provides superior strength and is resistant to damage. The blue color is also known industry-wide as the identifying color for Grade 120.

Grade 120 9/32" x 16' Pewag Chain- Pewag Binder Kit
Grade 120 9/32″ x 16′ Pewag Chain- Pewag Binder Kit

Contact US Cargo Control 

Product experts are available by phone to answer questions, take orders and provide information on bulk quantity pricing. You can call one of them toll free at 866-348-3473. Free shipping is available on orders of more than $2,000.

Tips for Avoiding Injury with a Lever Load Binder

Safety is a priority in the trucking industry.

In 2012, truck drivers were three times more likely to receive a nonfatal injury on the job compared to the average US adult worker, according to The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC also reports the most common injuries in the trucking industry include strains and sprains, bruising, fractures, cuts and soreness. These issues are typically caused by drivers overexerting, crashing, failing or being hit with an object.

Lever load binders can contribute to that risk, but there are precautions drivers can take to keep themselves and others safe.

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A lever chain binder used to tighten chain and secure a load to a flatbed trailer.

Lever Load Binders

Lever load binders have been used in the industry for decades and still are today. They use leverage to tighten chain and secure cargo to a trailer.

This specific style requires a lot of energy to engage, about 170 lbs., according to the organization Trucking Injury Reduction Emphasis, or TIRES. The force needed to operate the lever can easily cause sprains and strains.

Cheater Bars

Because lever binders require so much strength, drivers are often tempted to use a cheater bar to help tighten and release the handle. Using a cheater bar increases the risk of injury.

If the driver loses his or her grip, the lever and bar can snap or kickback and hit the driver. The bar can also fly off the lever and risk hitting people or property nearby.  Cheater bars can also exceed the working load limit, causing the strap or chain to break.

Cheater bars are considered dangerous, and are not recommended.

Peerless QuikBinder Plus™ Ratchet Loadbinder - 1/2"-5/8"
Peerless QuikBinder Plus™ Ratchet Loadbinder – 1/2″-5/8″

Alternative Binders

Ratchet binders are generally known throughout the industry as the safer option and require less energy to engage, about 10 lbs., according to TIRES. The ratchet design also gradually releases unlike a lever.

Another option includes the patented QuikBinder PLUS which is touted as stronger, safer and more functional compared to a standard ratchet or lever binder.

 

Lever Binder Safety Tips  

If you are going to continue using a lever binder here are a few precautionary safety tips:

  • Routinely inspect the binder for wear, do not use it if you see bending and cracks.
  • Do not operate the lever binder with more than one person
  • Do not operate the lever binder while you or someone else is standing on the load
  • Operate the lever binder in a way that you are on the ground, with secure footing
  • Never use a cheater bar to tighten or release the load
  • Always tighten, by hand, in a downward manner
  • Be aware of the line of fire should you lose your grip
  • Always wear gloves to keep your grip and to protect your hands.

US Cargo Control offers many styles of chain binders, including lever, ratchet and the QuikBinder Plus. You can check out the full binder inventory by visiting the website or by calling a sales specialists at 866-348-3473.