How to Safely Apply Wire Rope Clips to Wire Rope Assemblies

This video shows you how to safely apply wire rope clips to wire rope assemblies. Depending on the size of your assembly, two to three wire rope clips are generally required. See below for a full transcript of the video. 

 

 

For more information on the differences among wire rope clips and how to choose the correct one, see our How to Use Wire Rope Clips post.

Safety Notes: Always inspect wire rope for wear and abuse before applying wire rope clips. Apply wire rope clips over bare wire rope only. Use wire rope thimbles to protect the eye from being crushed and to prevent wear and abrasion on the rope.  Never use a wire rope clip to directly connect two straight lengths of wire rope.
 

An important phrase to remember when applying a wire rope clip is “Never Saddle a Dead Horse”. This means you should never apply the saddle side of the clip over the dead end of the rope – the live end should always rest in the saddle. See above video for a demonstration. 

Step 1.   

Turn back the specified amount of rope from the thimble. Apply first clip one base width from the dead end of the rope. Tighten nuts evenly, alternating from one nut to the other until reaching the recommended torque. 

Step 2.  

If only two clips are required, apply the second clip as near the loop or thimble as possible. Remember, U-Bolt over dead end. Tighten nuts evenly, alternating until reaching the recommended torque.  

When applying more than two clips, apply the second clip as near the loop or thimble as possible, turn nuts on second clip firmly, but do not tighten.  

Step 3.   

Space additional clips equally between the first two. Apply tension and then tighten the nuts on each clip evenly, alternating from one nut to the other until reaching recommended torque. 

 

Purchase Wire Rope Clips and more from US Cargo Control 

From wire rope, wire rope clips, and wire rope thimbles, to chain hoists and material handling equipment, US Cargo Control has your rigging and lifting equipment needs covered. Visit US Cargo Control.com or call 866-444-9990.  With teams of dedicated consultants, we make sure you get what you want, when you need it.  

Hauling Wide Loads and Oversize Loads: Important Questions to Consider

Hauling wide loads or oversize loads can be a daunting challenge. There are many variables you must consider prior to taking on these jobs: permits, route selection, required truck and bed size, pilot cars, cargo securement equipment, and of course, oversize load/wide load banners and signage

Because wide load and oversize load regulations vary from state to state, the preparation required to haul these loads can often be more work than the haul itself.

 

What Makes a Shipment a Wide Load or Oversize Load? 

hauling oversize wide loads
Because these tires can’t be broken down into smaller parts, they must be hauled as an oversize load.

First, understand that a load is considered oversized based on either its width or weight. If your shipment is over on either measurement it is considered oversize. If your load meets all weight limits, but not width limits, it is considered a wide load.

Generally, if your vehicle or load is wider than 8’6″ you will need wide load permits. Legal length is usually 48′ to 53′, and maximum weight is about 46,000 pounds. However, this varies by state. Some states measure by the overall length while others only use kingpin to rear axle length.

For a comprehensive list of regulations by state, see our Wide Load and Oversize Load Banner Requirements by State post

If your shipment can be broken down into smaller or lighter parts, you will probably not be able to obtain wide load or oversize load permits.

 

When do Wide Loads and Oversize Loads Require Pilot Vehicles? 

oversize loads pilot car
Depending on your load size and route details, civilian or police escorts may be required.

If your shipment exceeds a 12′ width you may need one to two pilot vehicles. These vehicles will be able to warn you of any accidents, construction zones, bridges, low wires, or other upcoming hazards.  

Remember, many states only allow you to travel with pilot vehicles from 30 minutes before sunrise to 30 minutes after sunset. 

 

How Many Safety Flags, Oversize Load Signs, and Wide Load Banners do you Need? 

Again, this all depends on the size of your shipment. Generally, you need red safety flags on all four corners of your tractor trailer and amber warning lights up top to meet visibility requirements.  

Also, you will most likely need oversize load signs or wide load banners in both the front and rear of your vehicle. If you have pilot vehicles with you, they may also need flags and lights. Keep in mind that many states restrict or prohibit oversize loads during the holidays and over weekends.

 

Be Prepared for Oversize Load and Wide Load Hauling 

With the proper planning, oversize load and wide load hauling become much more manageable. The next time you need the proper flags, banners, lighting, or signage for oversize load or wide load hauling, US Cargo Control can help get you what you want, when you need it. 

hauling oversize loads
Shop Oversize Load Signs
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Shop Red Safety Flags

SC&RA Hauling Job of the Year Spotlight: Precision Specialized, Edwards Moving & Rigging 

US Cargo Control is a proud member of the SC&RA and had a great time attending the SC&RA annual conference in Boca Raton earlier this year.  

The entries for 2018 Hauling Job of the Year were seriously impressive and now the results are in. 

Find out what it took for two transportation companies to take home the trophy in their respective categories and see their incredible entry videos below. 

2018 SC&RA award winners
2018 SC&RA Hauling and Moving job winners. Source: SC&RA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hauling Job of the Year – Under 160,000 Pounds

Precision Specialized, a flatbed trucking company out of Ontario, Canada took home this award. Their massive job entailed transporting 16 various sized modules for the world’s largest designer of modular plant and demonstration-scale systems. These expensive and fragile modules ranged in size from 40′ x 12′ x 12′ up to a whopping 40′ x 16′ x 14′. The driving route, from the Greater Toronto Area to just south of New York City, was nothing short of hectic.

First, weight-per-axle restrictions on the bridge connecting Canada to the U.S. required numerous special application requests. Then, construction patterns in Pennslyvania made it extremely difficult to find a viable route. Eventually, it took a full road closure for five miles in both directions and a tricky two-trailer load. After two years of careful planning, including trimming low-hanging trees and coordinating power line clearance, the job was successfully completed. Precision used their Aspen 95-ton, 13-axle rear steer perimeter trailer, with a custom-made 13-foot deck.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q3FEakrge6M?rel=0

 source: PrecisionGroupAG


Hauling Job of the Year – 160,000 Pounds to 500,000 Pounds 

Edwards Moving and Rigging out of Shelbyville, Kentucky won the trophy for this middleweight category. In May 2017, they hauled three of the largest-ever fully assembled turbines 230 miles, from New York to Pennslyvania. Each turbine weighed in at 375,000 pounds and measured 16.25′ tall by 16.48′ wide.

After six months of planning and coordination with upper-level DOT personnel, the first turbine was loaded and delivered. It took 10 days and about 2,993-man hours for it to reach its destination. The route included going through a private property owner’s yard and, at one point, crossing over an interstate median and driving on the opposite side of the interstate. The final permitted weight of the configuration came to 913,227 pounds and measured 345′ x 19.5′ x 18′. It was all handled by a dual-lane 32-axle Aspen A500 expandable transporter with three Kenworth C500 tractors as the prime movers.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKetJ5G8N5I?rel=0

source: edwardsmovers


How to Enter Hauling Job of the Year Competition 

Does your transportation company have an outstanding job to share? Check out the rules and regulations to understand the different categories and judging criteria.  

For all your flatbed trailer equipment, including oversize and wide load signs, check out the USCC website for quality products that are backed by teams of dedicated consultants. 

2018 International Roadcheck: Focus on Hours-of-Service Compliance

Heads up. The largest targeted commercial vehicle enforcement program is back again. From June 5th – 7th, CVSA inspectors will be out in droves conducting North American Standard Level I Inspections at checkpoints across the United States, Canada, and Mexico.  

If a critical violation is found, inspectors may place you out of service.

Learn what to expect during this 72-hour International Roadcheck to ensure you and your vehicle are ready for inspection.  

Hours-of-Service Compliance 

Hours-of-Service (HOS) regulations have always been a hot topic amongst truck drivers and carriers. Since recent ELD implementation, demands for change to the current HOS regulations have only increased.

But law enforcement is not backing down.

ELD mandate HOS rules
The more familiar you are with your ELD device, the quicker your inspection will go.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

According to the CVSA, thirty-two percent of all drivers who were placed out of service during the 2017 International Roadcheck had violated HOS regulations.

This year, HOS compliance is the main focus for inspectors. 

Remember, simply having a functioning ELD is not enough for you to pass inspection. To verify HOS compliance, make sure you have all your supporting documents ready and available for inspection. The more familiar you are with your ELD device, the quicker your inspection will go.

What Else to Expect from International Roadcheck 2018 

There will be more roadside inspections during this 72-hour period than any other time all year. And, while there will be an average of around 17 vehicles inspected every minute, it will still take anywhere from 30 to 45 minutes to complete an inspection.

Most likely, an inspector will come to open your door and talk with you for a bit. He or she will be checking for signs of drug and alcohol use. Have your licenses and other driver documents ready. Next, they will be checking to ensure your seatbelt and fire extinguisher are in working order.  Then, they will get under your hood and inspect your entire vehicle from front to back. 

The main areas they will be inspecting include brake systems, coupling devices, driveline/driveshaft components, exhaust systems, frames, fuel systems, lighting devices, steering mechanisms, suspensions, tires, wheels, rims and hubs, and even windshield wipers. 

They will also be checking for proper cargo securement 

International Roadcheck CVSA sticker
A CVSA decal will prove you passed inspection.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If no critical inspection item violations are found, you will get a CVSA decal put on your vehicle. This will prove you successfully passed your inspection and keep you from going through another inspection for the next three months.  

Have you ever been through an International Roadcheck inspection? Share what you experienced in the comments below, and stay safe out there.