Customer Photos: Adjustable Shoring Beams

image of shorting beams from USCargoControl.comWade sent us these photos showing how he used two of our 92″ adjustable aluminum shoring beams and horizontal e-track to create an elevated open loft area in his enclosed trailer. He spaced the beams to accommodate extra tires for his stock car, freeing up valuable floor space in the 28 foot long trailer.

“Before adding the shoring beams, I couldn’t carry as many tires as I would have liked on race day because they would take up too much room on the floor.”image of shoring beam load bars from USCargoControl.com

Shoring beams and E-track offer endless options for controlling cargo and making the very best use of space. While the beams create an extra space for holding tires, Wade says they also come in handy for securing gear: “I can roll in a portable tire rack and secure it to keep it from moving, and can also strap the hydraulic floor jack handle to the beam as well.”

image of USCargoControl.com shoring beams

Wade says the versatility of the E-track is what sold him on the system: “The great thing about the E Track is the adjustability. Now for storing the car for winter I have a storage rack in front of the car and behind it to make the best use of the space.”

To purchase the items shown here, visit:

 

Semi Truck Mud Flap Laws By State

article-new-thumbnail_ehow_images_a07_2f_0u_mud-flap-requirements-1_1-800x800Mud flaps may not be something you think about as you climb in your truck, but don’t let your record get dinged on account of ignorance.

Did you know there are no federal mud flap laws?  Because laws are set by each individual state, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) doesn’t mention them in its list of safety regulations.  So what mud flaps should you put on your truck?

Here’s what you need to know before adding mud flaps to your rig…

In Texas, Arizona, Delaware and Missouri, your mud flaps should be no more than 8 inches from the ground.  However, if you’re driving through Alaska, your mud flap only needs to hang 14 inches from the surface of the ground.

Maryland requires that mud flaps extend from the truck to the ground the same length as the tire’s width (If the tire is 12 inches wide, the mud flap should be 12 inches long).

While some states are more lenient, in Michigan, Oklahoma and Pennsylvania mud flaps must prevent debris from leaving the tire at a minimum 22.5 degree tangent angle.

Last but not least, New York law states that your mud flap can’t be more than 1/3 of the distance from where the bottom of the mud flap makes contact with the back wheel.

Some states are stricter than others, but with so many states having different requirements how do you obey the all the laws?  To be on the safe side, general guidelines recommend that your mud flaps don’t hang more than 6 inches from the ground.

If you are curious about any of the other 41 states’ specific rules regarding mud flap laws, check the department of transportation website for that particular state.

It’s also important to note that there are federal regulations regarding the use of conspicuity tape (reflective tape) on or near mudflaps.You can find information on those regulations on our Reflective Conspicuity Tape page on our website. For a full breakdown of the rules, check out this handy guide:

besttape

 

FMCSA Conspicuity Requirements for Commercial Motor Vehicles

“Hola” to our Spanish-Speaking Customers

Sales - Ed
Ed Duran, US Cargo Control

Customers calling US Cargo Control for product information or to place an order now have the option of speaking in Spanish.

Product Specialist Ed Duran is our resident Spanish-speaking expert and takes between five and ten calls a week. He says many of those customers speak both English and Spanish, but are most comfortable communicating in Spanish, especially when asking questions about products and specifications.

Duran was born in Cuba and grew up in Miami, speaking both languages. He says he’s happy to be able to help customers that call with questions.

“While the terminology can be different, the information is generally very similar. It’s just that my brain has to shift gears when Spanish-speaking customer calls come in,” says Duran.

The upswing in bi-lingual callers reflects a trend nationwide. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the U.S. Hispanic population is projected to reach 60 million in 2020.

Spanish-speaking customers can also reach Ed via e-mail at: customerservice@uscargocontrol.com.

 

Ball Bungees: Not Just for Tarps Anymore

image of ball bungees / bungee ball tie downs from USCargoControl.comBall bungees are fairly simple pieces of equipment when you think about it, but that doesn’t mean they don’t have an impressive list of diverse uses.  If you’re not familiar with what we’re talking about, these ball ties are also sometimes called bungee balls, toggle balls, or ball bungee snuggers. They’re just a short piece of rubber bungee cord that’s looped up and knotted inside a small plastic ball.

We added bungee balls to our website a few months ago and have been hearing about lots of different uses for these handy tie downs from our customers.

25 Uses for Ball Bungees

  1. Tying up kindling and firewood for your wood burning home stove. (Be sure to add ball bungees to your camping checklist this summer too.)
  2. Tie on a loose bumper or other car parts temporarily after a car accident.  This should only be a temporary solution – but it can help get the car out of the street and to the mechanic for a more permanent solution.
  3. Keep a car trunk, or truck end gate bungeed shut when you’re hauling something oversized.
  4. Tying down a tarp over virtually anything – especially when hauling on a trailer.
  5. Tie extension cords together.
  6. Add extra security to equipment you need to strap to the top of a vehicle.
  7. Grouping together tools, stuff in the garage, or even straight items like skis, ski poles, or fishing poles.
  8. For setting up small tarps or other ground cover over outdoor plants and trees to prevent freezing.
  9. Secure a gate closed when the latch has broken.
  10. Tie down a lid on a garbage can or recycling bin.
  11. Secure lids on pet food to keep unwanted animals and pests out.
  12. Attach Christmas lights or other decorations to fences, posts, etc.
  13. Loop around garden hoses before storing away for winter.
  14. Loop around handles on suitcases or other luggage pieces so you can attach ID tags and find them quickly at the airport.
  15. Secure flags on snowmobiles, ATVs, etc.
  16. Secure around pant leg before putting on snow boots to keep pant legs tucked in.
  17. Tie down a cooler inside a tractor cab to keep it in place.
  18. Bundle hockey sticks or skis together to make them easier to carry.
  19. Secure around rolled up outdoor carpeting to keep it tight while in storage.
  20. Secure a camera to a solid object to use a tripod.
  21. Add extra tie down points when using a cargo net.
  22. Hang tarps when doing home improvement projects to keep mess contained.
  23. Secure pet crates inside vehicle to keep them from sliding.
  24. Loop one around your phone and attach to your belt, backpack, etc. when outdoors.
  25. Gather and secure extra long extension cords, computer cords, media cables, etc. to keep them neat and managed.

You can find bungee ball tie downs in our bungee cord category on US Cargo Control: Bungee Cords.

If you already know what length and color of ball bungees you need, shop here:

 6″ Bungee Balls: Black (pack of 100)

6″ Bungee Balls: White (pack of 100)

9″ Bungee Balls: Black (pack of 100)

9″ Bungee Balls: White (pack of 100)

11″ Bungee Balls: Black (pack of 100)

11 Bungee Balls: White (pack of 100)

Have you used these handy bungee ball cords? Let us know how and we’ll add it to our list! Better yet- send us a picture; you just may see a blog post about it!